User Score
7.3

Generally favorable reviews- based on 12 Ratings

User score distribution:
  1. Positive: 9 out of 12
  2. Negative: 2 out of 12

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  1. Apr 8, 2013
    3
    Iranian filmmaker Abbas Kiarostami travels to Japan for this film about a young hooker who becomes involved with an old professor. Any movie that starts with a long, inert first scene is gonna be slow, but this one takes the prize. First is a restaurant with 2 locked-down cameras for 10 min. Second is in a cab for 15 min, while listens to 8 voicemail msgs. You get the idea. At one point the old man fell asleep behind the wheel of the car for more than a minute. All sequences take place in real time with static camera and low key performances. I had plenty of time to answer a few emails and not miss a thing (even in subtitles) and may be the only person in Richmond to see this. It does have a pretty surprising shaggy dog ending. Expand
Metascore
76

Generally favorable reviews - based on 31 Critics

Critic score distribution:
  1. Positive: 22 out of 31
  2. Negative: 0 out of 31
  1. Reviewed by: Robbie Collin
    Jun 21, 2013
    100
    Like Someone in Love, is another miracle at close quarters. Its subject is the impossibility of intimacy in the modern world: chewy stuff, to be sure, but Kiarostami explores it with a depth and delicacy that recalls the Japanese master Yasujiro Ozu.
  2. Reviewed by: David Parkinson
    Jun 17, 2013
    60
    Now practically an exile from his homeland, Kiarostami follows Certified Copy with another film-literate relationship drama with the enigmatic overtones of Hitchcock.
  3. Reviewed by: Michael Posner
    Apr 11, 2013
    75
    A delicate pearl of a movie, Like Someone in Love is thus a meditative dance along the ambiguous borders of truth and illusion. What, Kiarostami seems to be asking, can we actually see? What can we definitively know? Far less than we think.