Palisades Tartan | Release Date: February 17, 2010
7.1
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Generally favorable reviews based on 9 Ratings
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7
SindriFeb 20, 2011
Innovating and artistic - In "Lourdes" the existential converges with the mysterious and the distinct with the abstract.

Christine is a young woman with Multiple Schlerosis. She is chained to a wheelchair and can only get out if she signs
Innovating and artistic - In "Lourdes" the existential converges with the mysterious and the distinct with the abstract.

Christine is a young woman with Multiple Schlerosis. She is chained to a wheelchair and can only get out if she signs up for cultural or Christian trips. Christine has previously visited Rome, but her next destination is Lourdes, the iconic site of pilgrimage in the Pyreenes mountains.

Austrian Jessica Hausner's third feature plays out in the Christian pilgrimage town Lourdes, a fine choice of location, where the virgin Mary apparently appeared to the 14 year old girl Bernadette Soubirous in 1858. Hausner here tells the story about a reserved dough smiling and obliging woman who arrives at Lourdes hoping to be cured of her chronic illness. Jessica Hausner's quiet reflection of the intangibility concerning miracles and peoples individual relations to their faith is intellectually debated and asks several interesting questions that are also answered. Even though Hausner's film has elements of divinity by it in the use of music and some remarkable scenes, it is by no means a overly religious film. "Lourdes" is rather a concentrated study of a an enigmatic theme and a film where the characters reactions and reception to the abstract is the core.

Martin Gschlacht's skillful and structural photography compliments Hausners clear vision, and her steady, stringent and partly static direction is at it's best when she films the main character from versatile perspectives and creates descriptive portraits of an archetype character, excellent played by Sylvie Testud in a vital and radiating interpretation of a character that only has her face and her words to express herself with. Most actors delivers convincing acting and Hausner's film has a strong humane warmth that shines through the heroines being, and an elusive mood that is effectuated by the esoteric faces of the guests and employees at the place that has been called the catholic church's answer to Disneyland. This is a thoughtful and innovating film from a director with a recognizable personal style where one is left feeling like having seen something that lasted significantly longer than it's running time.
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