Metascore
81

Universal acclaim - based on 26 Critics

Critic score distribution:
  1. Positive: 26 out of 26
  2. Mixed: 0 out of 26
  3. Negative: 0 out of 26
  1. 100
    The intersections between sleep and waking, memory, cinema, and the Internet lead to a spectacular battle of titans who spring from the mind's darkest recesses.
  2. Reviewed by: Gianni Truzzi
    91
    Despite the jumble, Kon's eye-popping, surreal mastery of the Japanese dream is awakening.
  3. A gorgeous riot of future-shock ideas and brightly animated imagery, the doors of perception never close.
  4. Reviewed by: David Ansen
    90
    It happens to be one of the most wildly (and disturbingly) inventive animated films I've seen.
  5. 90
    The brilliant Paprika, directed by Satoshi Kon--a masterly example of Japanese anime, intended for adults--is partly hand drawn, and features multiple areas of visual activity layered at different distances from the picture plane.
  6. Whatever it is you're looking for - comedy, horror, parades of singing frogs and dancing kitchen appliances - you'll find it in Satoshi Kon's anime adventure, a jaw-dropping feat of imagination.
  7. While I liked the film's aesthetics and its futurist imaginings, its most important attraction is how it engages. Some movies massage you; others tickle you. This one jacks you into cyberspace, involving you psychically and physically.
  8. Reviewed by: Ty Burr
    88
    Someone walking cold into a movie theater showing Paprika might be excused for thinking the screen was having a Technicolor seizure. Fans of Japanese anime and filmmaker Satoshi Kon will simply feel dazzlingly at home.
  9. Reviewed by: Aaron Hillis
    88
    Paprika ain't no kiddie 'toon, even if its thumpin' techno-pop and bubble-gum thrills have the same splashy palette as an episode of "Pokémon" or "Dragon Ball Z."
  10. 83
    A film so joyfully insane that it feels like Kon is overcompensating.
  11. Satoshi Kon, whose previous film was the remarkable "Tokyo Godfathers," uses the complex plot as a pretext for joyous psychedelia.
  12. 78
    Schizophrenia never looked so good or so mesmerizing as it does here, and Paprika, while certainly not suitable for kids, manages to capture the childlike, helter-skelter chaos and curiosity of the human mind better than any other animated film.
  13. 75
    Fiercely provocative, Paprika shames Hollywood’s use of animation as a kiddie pacifier.
  14. We've gotten perhaps too used to the computerized wizardry of our own cartoon features; Kon, like Miyazaki shows us some older ways that can still transfix us.
  15. 75
    I can't claim to have followed the story line of Paprika any better than I did "Pirates of the Caribbean," but this mind-blowing, adult animated adventure from Japan is half the length and maybe five times as much fun.
  16. It's not a film for children, and it's not even something children would like. It's challenging and disturbing and uncanny in the ways it captures the nature of dreams -- their odd logic, mutability and capacity to hint at deepest terrors.
  17. 75
    It's a great place to visit, even if you wouldn't want to live there.
  18. Paprika is a creatively dizzying and visually dazzling allegory about alternative realities.
  19. It is an intelligently written piece that only falters during the finale.
  20. Reviewed by: Staff (Not credited)
    70
    This loopy anime from director Satoshi Kon ("Millennium Actress") isn't a movie that's meant to be understood so much as simply experienced -- or maybe dreamed.
  21. Reviewed by: Rob Nelson
    70
    Paprika, based on a serialized novel by Yasutaka Tsutsui, isn't a movie that's meant to be understood so much as simply experienced--or maybe dreamed.
  22. Reviewed by: Dana Stevens
    70
    One thing is for sure: The über-dream is both gorgeously animated, in Kon's shimmering, hyperreal style, and sickeningly scary.
  23. Reviewed by: Leslie Felperin
    70
    With its brainy scientist heroine, and surreal, super-kitsch imagery, above-average Japanese anime sci-fi pic Paprika has a better chance than most Nipponese toons of breaking out of the specialty ghetto by appealing to femme auds as well as the genre's core constituency of fanboys.
  24. It's best appreciated by assuming something of a dream state ourselves and enjoying the giddy flow.
User Score
8.1

Universal acclaim- based on 66 Ratings

User score distribution:
  1. Positive: 17 out of 17
  2. Mixed: 0 out of 17
  3. Negative: 0 out of 17
  1. Dec 4, 2011
    9
    The animation was beautiful, the story was genius, and the creativity of Paprika was beyond any anime I've ever seen. One thing irked me, though; its dull character dialogue. Full Review »
  2. Oct 7, 2013
    8
    Last film of great anime films director, Satoshi Kon. "Paprika" is visual beauty and exotic. It's a ironic regard about Japanese society. Excessive obsession with technology, desire of power, problem of suicide, sexual misconduct with little girls. "Paprika" is a kabuki thriller. Kon has great masterpiece. "Perfect Blue" is an inception, "Millennium Actress" is an intermezzo, "Tokyo Godfathers" is a rest and finally "Paprika" is most finale. As if it were a grand opera. "Paprika" is beautiful farewell. Full Review »
  3. Jan 14, 2012
    10
    Satoshi Kon has been one of the most visionary plot and character designers in the history of animation: his premature death in 2010 meant much less chances to see another masterpiece with the same charm and thrill as Paprika, which is undoubtedly a modern classic. Ignoring its deep plot would mean ignoring the true roots of blockbuster bestsellers like Inception, and losing the film that will continue to inspire tons of science fiction plots in the future. Full Review »