Miramax Films | Release Date: August 26, 2005
7.5
USER SCORE
Generally favorable reviews based on 179 Ratings
USER RATING DISTRIBUTION
Positive:
112
Mixed:
41
Negative:
26
WATCH NOW
Stream On
Stream On
Review this movie
VOTE NOW
0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10
Check box if your review contains spoilers 0 characters (5000 max)
5
jimmytancrediMay 29, 2011
For those who likes Grimms is good, for those who don't like them is a kinda boring. I think the story showed by a sensational way the fancy world of brothers Grimms.
0 of 1 users found this helpful01
All this user's reviews
6
TipsyMcBeeJan 27, 2012
The Brothers Grim may have horrendous CGI and a clunky plot to follow through, but the film was quite enjoyable and became okay at best. I did enjoyed Damon and Hedger's performances as the Grimm brothers, where they really stood out well forThe Brothers Grim may have horrendous CGI and a clunky plot to follow through, but the film was quite enjoyable and became okay at best. I did enjoyed Damon and Hedger's performances as the Grimm brothers, where they really stood out well for the characters they had to portrayed. The other performances however were okay. I also liked how many fairytale motifs were presented in such morbid conceptual scenes, but I would agree with others that the tone and dialogue felt campy, stale and out of context for something like the brothers Grimm and their fairy tales. The tone definitely felt like the film was trying to approach too many audiences but really cannot stick to one. The Brothers Grimm does not fully Live A Happily Ever After for this written review, but that does not mean it is a bad popcorn flick to rent. Expand
0 of 1 users found this helpful01
All this user's reviews
5
ChadS.Sep 9, 2005
My favorite moment in "The Brothers Grimm" is when director Terry Gilliam seems to be poking fun at the intense farewell embrace between Boromir and Aragon during the former's death scene in "The Fellowship of the Ring". It's very My favorite moment in "The Brothers Grimm" is when director Terry Gilliam seems to be poking fun at the intense farewell embrace between Boromir and Aragon during the former's death scene in "The Fellowship of the Ring". It's very funny. It stirred me out of my waking coma. To me, it's a great miscalculation to present the Grimm fairy tales as factual (within the diegesis), because that makes the brothers mere academics (as collectors of attempted child murder stories) rather than the fountains of imagination that they certainly were. It's a good idea to introduce the brothers as charlatans, but rather than present them as period piece ghostbusters, their occupation should be shown as a desperate means to support their fledgling writing career. A collection of enchanting fairy tales shouldn't be turned into a loud action film. "The Brothers Grimm" makes Gilliam's lost opportunity to bring Don Quixote to the screen seem doubly tragic. Expand
0 of 0 users found this helpful
4
JonM.Aug 18, 2006
So much potential gone to waste. Occaisonal spots of Gilliam's ingenious directorial flair get lost in a disjointed story line. The film seems to swing between childrens fantasy and attempts at more adult horror, leaving it lost some So much potential gone to waste. Occaisonal spots of Gilliam's ingenious directorial flair get lost in a disjointed story line. The film seems to swing between childrens fantasy and attempts at more adult horror, leaving it lost some where in the middle. I can only assume Hollywood money men reigned in Gilliam to keep the age cert. down, hence this confused state the film exists in. Expand
0 of 0 users found this helpful
6
lizaSep 1, 2005
My my, what a cackle of negativity we have here! people, please! were you really expecting a fantasy film on par with lord of the rings? while i agree that jackson's film raised the bar, let's not forget that this is gilliam, and My my, what a cackle of negativity we have here! people, please! were you really expecting a fantasy film on par with lord of the rings? while i agree that jackson's film raised the bar, let's not forget that this is gilliam, and this is hollywood. so the story was a little messy and it didn't quite hang togethe; neither, as some have said, did it entirely fall apart. and if you were expecting a history lesson from this director, well ... it was a fun popcorn movie with nifty special effects, and that was all it ever claimed to be. so for all you naysayers who wish you hadn't "wasted your evening" i say: next time, rent a classic! Expand
0 of 0 users found this helpful
5
GrantN.Jan 17, 2006
Terry Gilliam tells a story in a very unusual but captivating way. He has the power to turn nothing into something. And with the Brothers Grimm he almost is able to make nothing into something great with the help of two very talented actors. Terry Gilliam tells a story in a very unusual but captivating way. He has the power to turn nothing into something. And with the Brothers Grimm he almost is able to make nothing into something great with the help of two very talented actors. But alas Mr.Gilliam falls just short and makes a movie that is plainly mediocre. The ending provides the largest dissapointment of the entire movie. Expand
0 of 0 users found this helpful
4
oxanaSep 12, 2014
I was really left disappointed by this movie. The plot was more than chaotic - the line between stories and actual world hazy at best (more than was good for the movie itself). The characters weren't introduced well enough, and they didn'tI was really left disappointed by this movie. The plot was more than chaotic - the line between stories and actual world hazy at best (more than was good for the movie itself). The characters weren't introduced well enough, and they didn't grow nor gain depth during the movie. The visual effects were lousy as best - very unreal.

Couldn't stop noticing a few familiar actors from 'Pirates of the Caribbean' movies - and one Keira Knightley look-a-like. Not that they managed to shine either.
Expand
0 of 0 users found this helpful00
All this user's reviews
5
SpangleMay 12, 2017
Over the course of his career, director Terry Gilliam has earned a reputation for making adventurous and greatly imaginative films. Setting his sights upon the fairytales created by the Brothers Grimm and a story of the two brothers as conOver the course of his career, director Terry Gilliam has earned a reputation for making adventurous and greatly imaginative films. Setting his sights upon the fairytales created by the Brothers Grimm and a story of the two brothers as con artists who encounter a true fairy tale that inspires their books, it certainly seems on paper to be a perfect match. In many respects, the final product demonstrates just how at home Gilliam is at with the inventive nature of the fairy tales that instill the film with a great sense of wonder to accompany the incredibly dynamic and imaginative occurrences in the plot. Unfortunately, the film is just missing that it factor. It has everything there, but lacks that defining quality to make this another classic from Gilliam. Instead, it winds up being nothing more than a typical modern day blockbuster that wildly disappoints.

This missing factor is really what drives the film into feeling incredibly typical of mid-2000s Hollywood. In his best works, Gilliam's films have a few qualities to really define them as excellent adventure romps or imaginative explorations of the world. This defining quality is a great flow. With a light touch, Gilliam's films flow by nicely, never leaving you time to really notice the insanity on display and instead allow yourself to get swept up in the magical whimsy of the film. By the end, the worlds he creates are brimming with life, having scooped up the viewer and dropped them into this magical world of imagination. In The Brothers Grimm, however, every cog in the wheel is visible. Every imperfection. Every detail. Every bit is noticeable and the whimsical nature of the events is ruined. The sense of wonder is dispensed in the name of hitting every beat with no flow or sense of natural progression. Instead, it is an outline in film form with no connecting thread to make it all work. It is a Terry Gilliam that feels like an imitation of old school Gilliam, lacking the heart or grace with which he makes his films. Possessing every detail that a Gilliam film would have a decade prior, but lacking the purpose and wonder, The Brothers Grimm is a stiff production.

This stiff nature is reflected in the comedy, which is never less than clunky. Matt Damon and Heath Ledger are a joy to watch in their respective roles as the Brothers Grimm, but the lack of flow and heart provided by Gilliam finds its way to the script and dialogue. In his best works, any one-liners would work because they are simply arising naturally in the course of the dialogue. Here, it feels as if there is an emphasis on the comedy or an extra bit of punctuation added on that makes it feel tacked on and greatly unnatural. Immediately after any scene where a telegraphed joke falls flat or elicits a small amount of air to escape from your nose, you can feel Gilliam sitting in the seat next to you saying that he thought that part was hysterical. It certainly can be a funny film at times, but just as with its plot, the film's humor is often clunky and forced.

With regard to the story, the film is certainly mixed. Its sibling relationship is nice, but obvious. Setting it up with the two fighting as young boys when Jake (Ledger) sells a cow for beans, leaving the family with no money to heal their sister, it is always obvious how the strike will be resolved. Embracing magic and fairy tales in the world in direct opposition to the French government, the men will fight again before Will (Damon) realizes that Jake has been right all along: there is magic in the world. The story itself is a bit clunky as well with some obvious beats along the way and a shocking lack of originality. This is not a typical Gilliam film where a new and wondrous world is around every corner. There are moments like this, such as in Mercurio Cavaldi's (Peter Stormare) torture danger with cool torture devices and an orchestra to accompany the torture, but other than this one, the film is largely by-the-numbers. It is hard to hear Gilliam's voice amidst the sea of cliches and typical blockbuster events with the men being saved by conveniences (why did Will not get his throat cut), convenient and timely help, and squaring off with a comically awful Jonathan Pryce as the chief bad guy featuring a terrible French accent. Luckily for Pryce, he is not the only one with a bad accent here, as Peter Stormare is similarly comically bad with his accent. Together, they team up to create an opposing force who are demonized for not believing in fairy tales, even though Will himself does not believe in fairy tales and the duo con people by exploiting their hysterics related to fairy tales. So, by the end, it is clear that they are bad just because the film needed a bad guy, which is never true. If a film could come to fruition and reach the end without the bad guy being needed for the climax, it did not need that bad guy. The antagonist here is the Mirror Queen (Monica Bellucci), not Pryce's silly French general
Expand
0 of 0 users found this helpful00
All this user's reviews
5
raporgiDec 11, 2016
This review contains spoilers, click expand to view. its pretty much a retooled Baron Munchausen scipt with excessive dialogue, annoying characters, threats of execution, a remote location under siege. they shouldve just focused on building the mystery aspects rather than the crappy sleeping witch story. Heath ledger needs to shutup while Matt Damon's character needs to get crap beat out of him. Expand
0 of 0 users found this helpful00
All this user's reviews