Metascore
51

Mixed or average reviews - based on 23 Critics

Critic score distribution:
  1. Positive: 8 out of 23
  2. Negative: 3 out of 23
  1. Reviewed by: Jamie S. Rich
    Apr 3, 2014
    75
    It’s still worthwhile to see such seasoned screen professionals working to create something meaningful.
  2. Reviewed by: Rex Reed
    Mar 5, 2014
    75
    Ms. Bening does a touching, masterful job of conveying real emotional pain.
  3. Reviewed by: Sherilyn Connelly
    Mar 4, 2014
    70
    Bening and Harris have excellent chemistry.
  4. Reviewed by: Justin Chang
    Mar 4, 2014
    70
    This tale of a still-grieving widow (Bening) hypnotized by a dead ringer for her late husband verges on ludicrous, but ultimately succeeds at conveying one person’s complicated yet emotionally rational response to a highly irrational situation.
  5. Reviewed by: Ty Burr
    Mar 20, 2014
    63
    The result isn’t a great movie, but it is an excellent guilty pleasure.
  6. Reviewed by: Mary Houlihan
    Mar 13, 2014
    63
    The stars hold the film together.
  7. Reviewed by: Connie Ogle
    Mar 13, 2014
    63
    Thoughtfully directed and co-written by Arie Posin, the film is not a ghost story, nor is it played for campy laughs, but its melodramatic subject matter flirts with Douglas Sirk territory — and sometimes just dives right into it.
  8. Reviewed by: Lou Lumenick
    Mar 6, 2014
    63
    It’s the wonderful performances by Bening and Harris that make this flawed, somewhat maudlin film worth seeing.
  9. Reviewed by: Keith Uhlich
    Mar 4, 2014
    60
    Melodrama often risks the ridiculous to achieve the sublime, and though this unabashedly earnest tearjerker doesn’t completely transcend its narrative absurdities, it’s enough of a distinctively odd duck to keep you engaged.
  10. Reviewed by: John DeFore
    Mar 4, 2014
    60
    Annette Bening captivates as the self-delusionist, with Ed Harris ruggedly irresistible as the object of her fantasy.
  11. Reviewed by: Bill Goodykoontz
    Mar 20, 2014
    50
    It's a maudlin, superficial exercise in obsession masquerading as a heartfelt romance and study of grief, and character development is sorely lacking. Although well-acted, particularly by Annette Bening, the story feels contrived.
  12. Reviewed by: Mick LaSalle
    Mar 13, 2014
    50
    John Lennon once said that because he was an artist, if you gave him a tuba, he could get something out of it. The Face of Love presents us with Annette Bening and Ed Harris playing the tuba. They get something out of it - they get everything there is to get and more - but it's not enough.
  13. Reviewed by: Nikola Grozdanovic
    Mar 11, 2014
    50
    The Face Of Love has splashes of brilliance without and within its overtly saccharine story.
  14. Reviewed by: Claudia Puig
    Mar 7, 2014
    50
    It's a maudlin, superficial exercise in obsession masquerading as a heartfelt romance and study of grief, and character development is sorely lacking.
  15. Reviewed by: Susan Wloszczyna
    Mar 7, 2014
    50
    If Nancy Meyers ever decided to dabble in gothic romance, it probably would turn out to be something like The Face of Love.
  16. Reviewed by: Manohla Dargis
    Mar 6, 2014
    50
    That Mr. Posin and Mr. McDuffie have stacked the deck against Nikki would be more irritating if Ms. Bening didn’t immediately make this woman come so satisfyingly alive, breathing believable vitality and at times contradictory emotions into what might have otherwise registered as a blur or cliché.
  17. Reviewed by: Joe Morgenstern
    Mar 6, 2014
    50
    The director, Arie Posin, and his co-writer, Matthew McDuffie, have tried to do with their film — fill a bare-bones version of the Hitchcock film with an illusion of life. They do succeed sporadically.
  18. Reviewed by: Robert Abele
    Mar 6, 2014
    50
    Arie Posin regrettably sticks to the tastefully designed, artless tear-jerker. The lost opportunity is that he's got the masterful Bening and Harris to play with, great enough actors to turn any interaction — however tritely written — into an intimate, emotionally honest dance of the scarred and delicate.
  19. Reviewed by:  Ignatiy Vishnevetsky
    Mar 5, 2014
    50
    The Face Of Love provides itself with countless similar opportunities for emotional sweep, and squanders most of them by being workmanlike and unambitious, presuming that a story and a string score are enough to carry a movie.
  20. Reviewed by: Mike D'Angelo
    Mar 4, 2014
    50
    Whether it’s worth seeing a film solely for one amazing performance is a personal judgment call; for those who take that particular leap once in a while, though, here’s a worthy candidate.
  21. Reviewed by: Liam Lacey
    Apr 18, 2014
    38
    After a while, it begins to feel like a confused comedy: How to explain to the neighbours that your dead husband has moved back home?
  22. Reviewed by: Chuck Bowen
    Mar 4, 2014
    38
    An almost offensively "tasteful" dud that remains irritatingly on the surface, more alive to the set design than the characters' motivations.
  23. Reviewed by: Michael O'Sullivan
    Mar 27, 2014
    37
    Bening and Harris are great actors, and they fill their roles as completely as they can, given the limitations of the soggy and implausible script by Matthew McDuffie and director Arie Posin.
User Score
tbd

No user score yet- Awaiting 2 more ratings

User score distribution:
  1. Positive: 1 out of 2
  2. Negative: 0 out of 2
  1. Apr 7, 2014
    5
    This is a Lifetime Movie of the Week with an A-list cast. Annette Bening meets a man (Ed Harris) who looks just like her dead husband (also played by Harris). Nothing that happens next is in any way original. She's too glum for too long and he's too perfect, patient and understanding. While the actors create a compelling couple, the painfully predictable plot, uninspired script and lackluster direction undermine any hope of making this movie special (except maybe a Special Movie Event on cable). Full Review »
  2. Mar 11, 2014
    8
    This movie is worth seeing because of the tour-de-force performance by Annette Bening. You will forgive the hard-to-believe premise and just soak up the authenticity of this complex real character brought to life with such depth and complexity. Ms. Bening is truly one of the greatest living actors of our time. It's also refreshing to see a movie about actual grown-ups, without CG, explosions or bodily function jokes.
    More, please!
    Full Review »