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  • Summary: An evocative portrait of youthful possibility, The Family Jams follows Devendra Banhart, Joanna Newsom and Vetiver as they tour the USA in 2004 playing their unique music for a newly growing audience. The film is an intimate portrait of life on the road for these young musicians early inAn evocative portrait of youthful possibility, The Family Jams follows Devendra Banhart, Joanna Newsom and Vetiver as they tour the USA in 2004 playing their unique music for a newly growing audience. The film is an intimate portrait of life on the road for these young musicians early in their careers, playing tiny, obscure clubs and art galleries, but on the verge of larger success before their small, intimate vans are replaced by large, impersonal tour busses. Also featuring appearances and performances by Antony and the Johnsons, Espers, Meg Baird, The Pleased and Linda Perhacs. (Factory 25) Expand
Score distribution:
  1. Positive: 2 out of 3
  2. Mixed: 0 out of 3
  3. Negative: 1 out of 3
  1. Reviewed by: Andy Webster
    Apr 7, 2011
    90
    The low-key, hand-held Family Jams may not ever attain the stature of, say, a concert film like D. A. Pennebaker's "Don't Look Back." But it should, as a record of musicians in youthful flower, sharing a loose, heartfelt camaraderie and lack of pretension.
  2. Reviewed by: Ronnie Scheib
    Apr 10, 2011
    80
    Jams affords the opportunity to hang with gifted, genre-defying fringe artists at a pivotal point in their evolving careers.
  3. Reviewed by: Andrew Schenker
    Apr 5, 2011
    30
    Only a true fanatical follower of the "freak folk" musical scene with a high tolerance for artless verité camerawork will find much merit in Kevin Barker's extended home video.