Columbia Pictures | Release Date: September 24, 2004
6.4
USER SCORE
Generally favorable reviews based on 238 Ratings
USER RATING DISTRIBUTION
Positive:
145
Mixed:
14
Negative:
79
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10
TinaA.Jun 1, 2006
Are you people insane? This movie was amazing, and one of the best thrillers ever! Ms. Moore was spectacular!
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MarkB.Nov 13, 2004
There just isn't enough space, here or elsewhere, to adequately praise Julianne Moore. In films like Safe, Far from Heaven and The Hours, she corners the market on portrayals of suburban wives and mothers whose outward security and There just isn't enough space, here or elsewhere, to adequately praise Julianne Moore. In films like Safe, Far from Heaven and The Hours, she corners the market on portrayals of suburban wives and mothers whose outward security and placidity eventually gives way to hidden fears and desires that polite society doesn't allow to be discussed much less dealt with. (It's interesting that the offscreen Moore seems to have such a happy, totally uncomplicated family life.) Though I'm sure its makers weren't ambitious enough to intend it to be, The Forgotten, a modest, trendily conspiracy-minded thriller, is an interesting addition to the above list of delineations of Moore's most recognizable screen character. She plays a mom whose beloved son almost literally disappears into thin air before the movie begins; other similarly afflicted parents she meets have not only taken their tragic losses in stride, but seem to have completely forgotten that their children ever even existed. Moore not only won't forget, but her behavior--which most of us would consider for the most part absolutely normal and understandable for a grieving parent who has been denied closure--is viewed by the others (and by society) as completely inappropriate and bizarre. There are definitely all sort of potentially provocative subtexts here, but writer Gerard DiPego (Phenomenon) and director Joseph Ruben don't take the opportunities. Although this movie could be described as "The 2004 M. Night Shyamalan Movie That M. Night DIDN'T Make", Ruben is no auteur like the brains behind The Village. A competent, workmanlike thriller director who, along with Jonathan Demme, John Waters, Joe Camp, Michael Schultz and Bob Clark (what a motley crew THAT is!) is one of the very few 2004 directors to have been working since the 1970s, Ruben is primarily interested in goosing you from behind and yelling "BOO!" And that he does very effectively; an out-of-nowhere shock that Steven Spielberg delivered so effectively in Jaws, but did once and only once, is repeated several times here. (Judging from the reaction of the audience I saw this with, I've no doubt that the theater ushers who clean up the spilled popcorn and drinks between showings really earned their pay with this one.) Maybe this is why (some Metacritic voters to the contrary) The Forgotten, despite its seemingly out-of-nowhere ending that really isn't, hasn't aroused the extreme anger among some moviegoers that Shyamalan's far more ambitious, accomplished and elegant The Village has. Through it all, Moore delivers yet another perfectly tuned characterization that beautifully portrays all the necessary emotional peaks and valleys of her character's journey without ever seeming false, over the top or straining for effect. All in all, with Moore, The Forgotten is more than the sum of its parts; without Moore, it would be far, far less. Expand
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