Metascore
60

Mixed or average reviews - based on 31 Critics

Critic score distribution:
  1. Positive: 19 out of 31
  2. Negative: 2 out of 31
  1. Reviewed by: Andrew O'Hehir
    Oct 29, 2010
    90
    The good news is that Alfredson finds his footing in The Girl Who Kicked the Hornet's Nest and delivers a rousing, grueling, almost operatically scaled finale to the series.
  2. Reviewed by: Betsy Sharkey
    Oct 28, 2010
    90
    Rapace moves through the escalating exposure with a series of subtle shifts that are both painful and exquisite to watch. The actress can make eye contact seem like salt in an open wound.
  3. Reviewed by: Steve Persall
    Oct 27, 2010
    83
    For the initiated, however, Alfredson weaves a tidy web from loose ends left dangling.
  4. Reviewed by: Kim Newman
    Nov 22, 2010
    80
    A pick-up after the second film, if not as assured as the first. Rapace sets a high watermark for Rooney Mara in David Fincher's remakes.
  5. Reviewed by: Kirk Honeycutt
    Oct 24, 2010
    80
    The movie features a great finish, where three movies' worth of subplots and characters dovetail into a breathtaking climax and final confrontation that is positively soul satisfying.
  6. Reviewed by: Roger Moore
    Nov 10, 2010
    75
    This mismatched "couple" - have made, over the course of three long subtitled Swedish thrillers, the most dynamic duo of recent cinema history.
  7. Reviewed by: Connie Ogle
    Nov 4, 2010
    75
    In some ways, better than its book.
  8. Reviewed by: Peter Rainer
    Oct 29, 2010
    75
    For the most part, plays like a pretty good TV police procedural.
  9. Reviewed by: Amy Biancolli
    Oct 28, 2010
    75
    "Hornet's Nest" isn't the best of the three (that would be the first film, "The Girl With the Dragon Tattoo"), but it's the most challenging.
  10. Reviewed by: Michael O'Sullivan
    Oct 28, 2010
    75
    The final, deeply satisfying conclusion to the trilogy of Swedish thrillers based on Stieg Larsson's bestselling novels.
  11. Reviewed by: Peter Travers
    Oct 28, 2010
    75
    Hornet's Nest is talky but indisputably terrific, and it ends in a dazzling display of courtroom fireworks. Rapace is hot stuff in any language. Oscar, take heed.
  12. Reviewed by: Roger Ebert
    Oct 27, 2010
    75
    So what has happened is that this uptight, ferocious, little gamin Lisbeth has won our hearts, and we care about these stories and think there had better be more.
  13. Reviewed by: James Berardinelli
    Oct 27, 2010
    75
    An entertaining thriller. That said, it's the weakest of the films, falling a length or two behind "The Girl Who Played with Fire," and considerably more than that with respect to "The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo."
  14. Reviewed by: Manohla Dargis
    Oct 28, 2010
    70
    Mr. Alfredson directed the second movie as well, and his work is again essentially functional, limited to clumsy action sequences and television-ready conversations. He doesn't prettify the violence in either movie, which might be unintentional but makes them feel more honest than the first did.
  15. Reviewed by: Joe Morgenstern
    Oct 28, 2010
    70
    Once Lisbeth has her day in court, though, the buildup pays off and then some.
  16. Reviewed by: Andrea Gronvall
    Oct 28, 2010
    70
    In place of romance there are numerous talky espionage scenes that make the movie feel like one of those labyrinthine cold war pictures from the 60s.
  17. Reviewed by: Boyd Van Hoeij
    Oct 24, 2010
    70
    Benefits from edge-of-your-seat pacing despite a conspicuous lack of action.
  18. Reviewed by: Steven Rea
    Oct 28, 2010
    63
    Mostly The Girl Who Kicked the Hornet's Nest belongs to Mikael Blomkvist (Michael Nyqvist), the tall and intrepid magazine journalist who is determined to clear Lisbeth's name, and who goes about doing so - and making espresso and checking his e-mail - with zeal.
  19. Reviewed by: Michael Phillips
    Oct 28, 2010
    63
    Larsson's leading characters have less to do in this wrap-up chapter. As Larsson wrote it and screenwriter and exposition-condenser Ulf Rydberg adapted it, it's a rather wobbly blend of courtroom drama and loose ends tied, albeit rather leisurely.
  20. Reviewed by: Tasha Robinson
    Oct 28, 2010
    58
    It's rarely tedious, but it's also rarely insightful or propulsive, and since there's nothing new to discover about the characters or their world, much of the film feels like a protracted, contrived pause, as everyone waits for Rapace to finally get back into the game.
  21. Reviewed by: Rick Groen
    Oct 29, 2010
    50
    Sorry, this one doesn't really work at all, but don't blame the workers.
  22. Reviewed by: Elizabeth Weitzman
    Oct 29, 2010
    50
    The Swedish edition, which ends with this bleak finale, is downright grim.
  23. Reviewed by: Claudia Puig
    Oct 28, 2010
    50
    Has such dull patches that as a Volvo races to the scene of a massive shootout, a distracting thought comes to mind: Can Volvos even go that fast?
  24. Reviewed by: Wesley Morris
    Oct 28, 2010
    50
    This native send-off is robotic enough to leave you eager to see what an artist might do with a reboot.
  25. Reviewed by: Owen Gleiberman
    Oct 27, 2010
    50
    Mostly an epic rehash of the tale Larsson has already told, and that makes it, at two hours and 28 minutes, the first movie in the series that never catches fire.
  26. Reviewed by: Melissa Anderson
    Oct 26, 2010
    50
    Like the first two Millennium movies, this final installment feels thoughtlessly put together, its script unpruned and rushed through, all to capitalize on the staggering worldwide popularity of its dead author.
  27. 50
    Larsson is renowned for his attention to marginal details, which gives his prose a rambling, one-thing-after-another pace that many readers find soothing. Onscreen, the lack of acceleration makes for one of those long Scandinavian winter nights.
  28. Reviewed by: Stephanie Zacharek
    Oct 28, 2010
    40
    Hornet's Nest is filled with boring, not-great-looking white guys, talking - a lot.
  29. Reviewed by: Joshua Rothkopf
    Oct 26, 2010
    40
    This can't be a faithful facsimile of the literary phenomenon currently turning soccer moms into Scandinoir crackheads. Nor can ethical journalist Mikael (Nyqvist), an uncoverer of conspiracies, actually be the dull, Windbreakered nonaction hero onscreen.
  30. Reviewed by: Vadim Rizov
    Oct 29, 2010
    30
    Fans will presumably get what they came for; what anyone else gets out of it is hard to say.
  31. Reviewed by: Kyle Smith
    Oct 29, 2010
    25
    If Swedish villains are this dumb, put me on the next plane to Stockholm. Just don't make me watch these idiotic movies on the flight.
User Score
7.0

Generally favorable reviews- based on 48 Ratings

User score distribution:
  1. Positive: 12 out of 13
  2. Negative: 0 out of 13
  1. Mar 22, 2011
    10
    The ending of the movie trilogy. In totality, the three were each better than anything I saw released by the major domestic studios during 2010. And the third part is fulfilling if not as action packed as the other two. It'll be interesting to see if the American remake can beat this Swedish production. Noomi rocks the role of Lisbeth! Full Review »
  2. Nov 29, 2010
    10
    These Swedish films are based on author Stieg Larsson's very popular "Millennium" trilogy of books.
    The "Girl With The Dragon Tattoo" is the
    first, and "The Girl Who Played With Fire" is the second, while "The Girl Who Kicked The Hornet's Nest" is the last in the series.
    All three should be viewed in sequence. Be sure to get the Swedish originals instead of the Hollywood remakes.
    Each of the three is stylistically different, but each is qualitatively in the top 10 percent of movies ever made - a 10 rating.
    Tattoo is essentially a murder mystery and is nicely developed at a relaxed pace. The main point in this is the introduction of the girl, who is a fascinating personality that constitutes a underlying mystery within the mystery explored in the film itself. This mystery of the Girl is revealed in the next two films in the series.
    Fire is a mystery-action movie, and unlike the relaxed pace of Tattoo (to emphasis the mystery), Fire has a fast pace that emphasizes the action.
    The mystery of the Girl is completely revealed in Nest, the final movie. Simultaneous plots are shown in shifts back and forth, which is potentially confusing for some viewers. However, this is skillfully accomplished as the plots of the investigation, the trial, and the experiences of the girl through all of this are depicted.
    This is an outstanding set of three movies. People that don't speak Swedish and who do not like sub-titles may not like this aspect of the movies, but there is also a fine version of Tattoo (the first movie) that is English dubbed. English dubbed versions of the second and third of the set may be forthcoming.
    Full Review »
  3. Dec 1, 2012
    5
    "The Girl Who Kicked The Hornet's Nest" is the final completion of the Millennium trilogy which main advantage was the original novel by Stieg Larsson. We, the observers of these three movies, know pretty much all about Lisbeth Salander of the first two films. We've got other disgusting characters in the 3d movie of the series and we've got some other brutal homicides. Daniel Alfredson, who directed the pretty good "The Girl Who Played With Fire" was also making this movie and he was kind of successful with it. But just kind of. Props to him for selecting the important scenes out of this really big novel, criticism for him for not making it thrilling. Of course, there are some parts it gets enthralling but the main part of this movie is actually calm. Lisbeth is curing before getting into the lawsuit and as you should've expected it's nothing spectacular. Some scenes are nice, some scenes are too slow after my fancy. See, the film is not bad - if the Millennium trilogy would've been a short TV series, this could be a felicitous last episode - but as a 140 minute film it gets sluggish. I'm not as disappointed as I was with "The Girl With The Dragon Tattoo" but "The Girl Who Kicked The Hornet's Nest" isn't a good film either. However, I was entertained relatively all the time and if you've reasonably enjoyed the first two pictures I'd also recommend you to watch this one. In fine, it just lacks a real blast. Even the final scene is non-satisfying; I intensively hoped for another last scene after the credits (which didn't come). That's it, the final movie of the Millennium trilogy is nothing more than an 'okay'. Full Review »