Metascore
88

Universal acclaim - based on 41 Critics

Critic score distribution:
  1. Positive: 39 out of 41
  2. Negative: 0 out of 41
  1. Reviewed by: Shawn Levy
    Dec 24, 2010
    100
    It's a fine, absorbing work, built with brilliance and without excessive showiness or flash. It feels, in fact, like a classic virtually upon its arrival.
  2. Reviewed by: Connie Ogle
    Dec 24, 2010
    100
    Tom Hooper's terrific, Oscar-worthy film is not merely a spot-on period piece; it's also a heartfelt study in the shadings of courage, a film about duty and friendship that's often warmly funny and sometimes painful to watch.
  3. Reviewed by: Steve Persall
    Dec 22, 2010
    100
    Like Bertie's struggle, there's so much wonderment to articulate about this film that being mistaken for a stammering idiot is a risk. See it, then say it for yourself: The King's Speech is the best movie of 2010.
  4. Reviewed by: Roger Moore
    Dec 22, 2010
    100
    Engrossing and moving story of a alternately warm and combative relationship.
  5. Reviewed by: Carrie Rickey
    Dec 16, 2010
    100
    Under Hooper's deft direction, it packs the suspense of a thriller.
  6. Reviewed by: Roger Ebert
    Dec 15, 2010
    100
    What we have here is a superior historical drama and a powerful personal one.
  7. Reviewed by: Lou Lumenick
    Dec 11, 2010
    100
    Old-school filmmaking at its best.
  8. Reviewed by: Rex Reed
    Dec 11, 2010
    100
    As the actor of the year in the film of the year, I can't think of enough adjectives to praise Firth properly. The King's Speech has left me speechless.
  9. Reviewed by: Joe Neumaier
    Dec 11, 2010
    100
    Despite being about a royal family at a critical moment in history, The King's Speech doesn't shout about its many strengths. Rather, it urges you to lean in close, where its intelligence and heart come through loud and clear.
  10. Reviewed by: Ian Nathan
    Dec 11, 2010
    100
    Think the blazing joys of "Chariots Of Fire" where the race is to the end of a sentence. Can it be that the British are coming?
  11. Reviewed by: Pete Hammond
    Dec 11, 2010
    100
    The King's Speech is a magnificent movie treat, one of the very best pictures of the year.
  12. Reviewed by: Peter Rainer
    Dec 11, 2010
    100
    A remarkable movie about a remarkable friendship. It honors the audience's intelligence, which makes it a double rarity.
  13. Reviewed by: Joe Morgenstern
    Dec 11, 2010
    100
    No screen portrait of a king has ever been more stirring-heartbreaking at first, then stirring. That's partly due to the screenplay, which contains two of the best-written roles in recent memory, and to Mr. Hooper's superb direction.
  14. Reviewed by: Bob Mondello
    Dec 11, 2010
    100
    It's the relationship between the two men that makes the film work: Geoffrey Rush's teacher cracking the quip, and Colin Firth so persuasive as the panicky king that by the time he gets to his crucial speech about going to war, you'll be panicking right along with him.
  15. Reviewed by: Amy Biancolli
    Dec 11, 2010
    100
    The King's Speech is a warm, wise film - the best period movie of the year and one of the year's best movies.
  16. Reviewed by: Claudia Puig
    Dec 7, 2010
    100
    Let's say it without equivocation: Colin Firth deserves an Oscar for his lead role in The King's Speech as the stammering King George VI.
  17. Reviewed by: Stephanie Zacharek
    Dec 11, 2010
    95
    A direct and heartfelt piece of work. It's conventional, maybe, in its sense of filmmaking decorum, but extraordinary in the way it cuts to the core of human frustration and feelings of inadequacy, reminding us how universal those feelings are.
  18. Reviewed by: Bill Goodykoontz
    Dec 17, 2010
    90
    A host of British acting royalty, meanwhile, roams around the film: Derek Jacobi as the Archbishop of Canterbury, Claire Bloom as Queen Mary, Timothy Spall as Winston Churchill and so on.
  19. Reviewed by: Andrew O'Hehir
    Dec 11, 2010
    90
    It's a warm, richly funny and highly enjoyable human story that takes an intriguing sideways glance at a crucial period in 20th-century history.
  20. Reviewed by: Marc Savlov
    Dec 24, 2010
    89
    It's a "keep calm, carry on" wartime melodrama of the first order, and stiff though it may be, it is never less than brilliantly done.
  21. Reviewed by: Mike Scott
    Dec 24, 2010
    88
    One of the chief reasons that director Tom Hooper's richly produced film works so well is because it operates on so many different levels. The King's Speech is all about layers, and Hooper keeps it humming on several at once.
  22. Reviewed by: Lawrence Toppman
    Dec 24, 2010
    88
    Polished, thoughtful and touching.
  23. Reviewed by: Joe Williams
    Dec 24, 2010
    88
    The King's Speech is the epitome of prestige cinema, an impeccably crafted and emotionally compelling drama that deserves the many laurels it surely will receive.
  24. Reviewed by: James Berardinelli
    Dec 19, 2010
    88
    Delivers solid drama with a rousing climax - a fully satisfying and uplifting period piece that achieves its dramatic potential without sacrificing historical accuracy.
  25. Reviewed by: Michael Phillips
    Dec 17, 2010
    88
    The actors, predictably, are superb in roles shaped by screenwriter David Seidler, and directed by Tom Hooper. Yet they are unpredictably superb as well.
  26. Reviewed by: Ann Hornaday
    Dec 16, 2010
    88
    It's the kind of absorbing, attractive, unfailingly tasteful enterprise that a critic can recommend without caveat.
  27. Reviewed by: Peter Travers
    Dec 11, 2010
    88
    Two men alone create an epic landscape of feeling in one of the very best movies of the year.
  28. Reviewed by: Rick Groen
    Dec 11, 2010
    88
    Yes, The King's Speech is a lively burst of populist rhetoric, superbly performed and guaranteed to please even discriminating crowds.
  29. Reviewed by: Tasha Robinson
    Dec 11, 2010
    83
    The King's Speech is admirably free of easy answers and simple, happy endings; it's a skewed, awards-ready version of history, but one polished to a fine, satisfying shine.
  30. Reviewed by: Lisa Schwarzbaum
    Dec 11, 2010
    83
    Lest the audience miss a cue, Hooper and soundtrack composer Alexandre Desplat count on the ringing grandeur of Beethoven's Seventh Symphony - the famous second movement, no less - to amp the emotions.
User Score
8.3

Universal acclaim- based on 612 Ratings

User score distribution:
  1. Negative: 8 out of 149
  1. Jan 30, 2011
    3
    Okay, after looking at some of these reviews I seem to be way off the mark on this one!! But have you ever sat through a movie and from the get go, just not believed a thing that the actors were doing and saw them just as actors acting?? Well thats exactly how I felt watching this!!! Colin Firth was spitting and stuttering on cue while throwing temper tantrums that would make a 3 year old look childish and Geoffrey Rush was looking oh so very Caricature. It just felt like an over acted, staged, Oscar Hungry play....not a movie!! The entire audience seemed blown away after the film but I just didnt get it!!! Full Review »
  2. Dec 10, 2010
    10
    Two acting titans: Rush and Firth; every mature character actor in the UK; Helena!; the Brits do it again. The film was a delight to watch and the viewer is given a wonderful reprieve from the simplistic, the empty,the 3D onslaught! Full Review »
  3. Dec 31, 2010
    10
    An absolutely outstanding movie! I cannot remember when an audience spontaneously broke out in applause at the end of a movie! Truly, an incredible film. Kudos to the entire cast and crew! Thank you for making going to the movies fun again! Full Review »