The Look of Silence Image
Metascore
91

Universal acclaim - based on 9 Critics What's this?

  • Summary: In this companion film to The Act of Killing, a family that survived the genocide in Indonesia confronts the men who killed one of their brothers.
Score distribution:
  1. Positive: 8 out of 9
  2. Negative: 0 out of 9
  1. Reviewed by: Joshua Rothkopf
    Aug 27, 2014
    100
    A superior work of confrontational boldness, it might be the movie Oppenheimer wanted to make in the first place.
  2. Reviewed by: Eric Kohn
    Sep 1, 2014
    100
    Compared to "The Act of Killing," Oppenheimer's technique with The Look of Silence is deceptively simple, but it applies a more traditional style of documentary storytelling to extraordinary goals.
  3. Reviewed by: Jessica Kiang
    Aug 27, 2014
    100
    The film does not stab as deeply in laying bare the schizoid moral hypocrisy of the perpetrators of the Indonesian genocide as its peerless predecessor, but instead offers an extraordinarily poignant, desperately upsetting meditation on the legacy of those killings, and on the bravery required to seek any kind of truth about them.
  4. Reviewed by: John Bleasdale
    Aug 28, 2014
    100
    Oppenheimer's first film maintained a passive detachment, allowing the killers to re-enact their own atrocities and metaphorically hang themselves with their own words. The Look of Silence takes a far harder line, probing the killers more deeply and confronting them in an attempt to shake some sense of remorse out of them.
  5. Reviewed by: Peter Bradshaw
    Aug 28, 2014
    100
    The Look of Silence — like The Act of Killing — is arresting and important film-making.
  6. Reviewed by: Deborah Young
    Aug 27, 2014
    90
    The Look of Silence is perhaps even more riveting for focusing on one man’s personal search for answers as he bravely confronts his brother’s killers.
  7. Reviewed by: Alonso Duralde
    Sep 1, 2014
    52
    The Look of Silence feels more like an extended DVD extra to his genre-defying previous film than a stand-alone documentary.

See all 9 Critic Reviews