User Score
8.2

Universal acclaim- based on 120 Ratings

User score distribution:
  1. Negative: 12 out of 120

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  1. Nov 9, 2013
    10
    I recently watched this film when I was in Japan (which I believe released in June). This is unlike most Miyazaki movies, as it is far deeper and more "adult" than most of his other films. It still has a light hearted, and stunning art style. It also has themes and messages, regarding World War 2, and lays out these messages very subtly. This movie wont be for everyone, since it is not traditional Miyazaki fare. However, this movie should not go unseen. Miyazaki's final film is something you will ponder for a long while. Collapse
  2. Nov 9, 2013
    9
    I tried to score 10 but, finally, I decided to score 9. "The Wind Rises" is like a Gabriel García Márquez's book. Miyazaki combines magical realism with traditional Japanese customs. If Isao Takahata gave a masterpiece about World War II titled "Grave of the Fireflies", Hayao Miyazaki brings most adult film ever for audiences. "The Wind Rises" is very difficult for some people because they aren't trained for these films. "The Wind Rises" must win next Academy Award for Best Animated Feature. Expand
  3. Nov 13, 2013
    10
    Wondeful movie! Best animated feature I've watched ever. Charmful and controversial. It's truly swan song for Miyazaki. Like "Grave of the Fireflies" or "Porco Rosso", "The Wind Rises" is 100% recommended.
  4. Nov 10, 2013
    0
    I love Miyazaki hayao and his films. And most people loves him too. He is the most famous animation director in the Japan. I watched his film in movie theater when I was child and it gave me a lot of imagination. But I hate 'only' this film. Because, first of all this film is distorting history. Japan was definitely starting World War II. It was not a victim. But in this film, it said 'Japan was a victim in WW2'. Second, the voice actor. Jiro's voice actor was awful. Anno hideaki, the voice actor of Jiro, was acting like textbook reader. So I couldn't concentrate in movie. For these reasons make me upset about this film. I'm so sad because this film is the last of Miyazaki hayao's film. Expand
  5. Feb 23, 2014
    10
    A fitting end to Miyazaki's fantastic career. This biography of airplane designer Juri Hurikushi is beautifully drawn and deeply moving. Some people complain that it's not like Spirited Away or Princess Mononoke, but Miyazaki isn't just about that. He is a great animator, and I'm sad to see him retire.
  6. Feb 23, 2014
    9
    “”The Wind Rises” is an animated feature written and directed by the acclaimed Japanese illustrator, Hayao Miyazaki. This is Mr. Miyazaki’s last animated film and, indeed, the filmgoing community is the lesser for it. The graphics contained in this film are breathtaking and as beautiful to view as one can imagine. The film tells the life story of one of the world’s greatest aircraft engineers, Jiro Hurikushi, as it follows his career as a near sighted boy who dreams of flying but, because of his poor eyesight, is forced to vicariously enjoy his passion by designing airplanes instead, The film chronicles Mr. Hurikushi’s life through Japan’s great earthquake in the early 20th Century, the massive tuberculosis epidemic and its great depression and is as enlightening as it is entertaining. The film is offered on two different screens, one with the original dialogue (with English subtitles) and the other with the English dubbed in. See the technically perfect dubbed in version with actor Joseph Gordon-Lewitt as Jiro and Emily Blunt as Naoko, the love of his life. The movie comes as near to perfect as possible but for one problem. It is too long and looking at my watch during the approximately 2 hours and 15 minutes was a distraction. As has so often been said, when the writer also assumes the role of director, it is like a parent trying to edit out the performances of his children….a difficult task that requires more objectivity than dedication and proves that too much of a good thing necessarily isn’t. With all of that being said, the film is nevertheless a lovely theatrical viewing experience and one that will be as enjoyable for its adult audience to see as it will be for the children who accompany them. I give the film a rating of 9 as this cinematic endeavor, like the wind in the title, will take the viewer to new and exciting heights. It is also a fitting farewell to Mr. Miyazaki and his own career as one of the world’s greatest animators. Expand
  7. Feb 28, 2014
    9
    The Wind Rises is a bittersweet farewell to one of the greatest animators of all time. It is easily one of his most mature films Hayao Miyazaki has made, as well as telling a great story with interesting characters
  8. Mar 9, 2014
    7
    I've seen all of Miyazaki's films. This certainly looked like a Miyazaki film, but it didn't feel like one. Usually his films are full of fantasy and imagination. This is a slow moving, straight-forward love story set during a war about a man who is passionate about designing and building airplanes and falls in love with a woman with TB. All of his other films were aimed at children, but young kids will get fidgety at this one, especially since it is 2 hours in length. You will also have to explain to your child why the leading man is a chain smoker and why he wants to design planes that drop bombs on other countries. In other words, this is a film for adults. All that said, the artwork in this film is gorgeous. I don't know how he draws buildings that look so real, and he is the absolute best at getting lighting correct. The film will hold your attention on its look alone. It's sad that this is the last film he will direct but I'm sure he will remain involved in Studio Ghibli and they will continue to release great movies. Expand
  9. Mar 2, 2014
    10
    A tender apostrophe to Miyazaki's career. It bookends Grave of the Fireflies and reminds us that amidst all the fantastic worlds we've seen from Studio Ghibli, their films and stories are steeped in the sometimes grim foray of reality, this time telling us the story of Dr Jiro Horikoshi, an engineer who revolutionized Japan's aerospace technology. It's a serious piece, half of which takes place in Jiro's mind, but that doesn't make it any less poignant. It's as touching as Mononoke Hime, as dark as Spirited Away, and at times as lighthearted as Howl's Moving Castle. It's a gorgeous film that deserves all the praise it receives. Expand
  10. Nov 11, 2013
    5
    This review contains spoilers, click expand to view. I was really disappointed with the film not because I expected a more magical Miyazaki but because his storytelling prowess is lost here. Though every single shot is so beautifully designed it's plagued by repetition and overly long sequences. It covers plenty of historical ground in 172 minutes but not much
    emotional ground. Besides his narrative being problematic, the whole ideology is immoral. The film explicitly makes a case for beauty and design being more important than preventing war and being with your wife in her dying days. Beauty is in fact, very ugly when it is used for destructive purposes, but the film doesn't do much to make this statement. And the man behind the design isn't very interesting. He lacks personality, and even his imaginative and inspired dreams become repetitive and don't inform much. Miyazaki doesn't make a very good case for the genius of this man. I applaud Miyazaki for not being pigeonholed into making the same movie again and again, and he proves to be adventurous even to the end. But the beauty of the rendered images cannot overshadow very obvious flaws.
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  11. May 12, 2014
    8
    The animation is pure Miyazaki, but the story isn't. We don't get any of the magic of Spirited Away nor the epics of Princess Mononoke - still, what we get is perhaps another strong statement about how animated films are not only meant for children (which is something already well assessed in Japan).

    The visuals are incredible as always, more beautiful than any CGI could create, but
    we're sort of left questioning ourselves why Miyazaki has chosen for his last film such a radical change of direction as regarding themes. Nevertheless, turning a figure like the protagonist's (he could look like a war criminal to many) into a dreamer who "only wanted to create something beautiful" is a bold move, and at least it has purpose. Don't forget that Miyazaki's previous themes (environment, communion with nature, and, especially in Howl's Moving Castle, hatred for war) should act as a deterrent for those who think this movie glorifies war. At most it glorifies Japan.

    I'm just sad this was a swansong. Let's hope he thinks twice and gets back to drawing. Meanwhile, we've got his son, whose From Up on Poppy Hill is really on the same page as The Wind Rises.
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  12. Mar 8, 2014
    10
    To say this film is beautiful is an understatement. Miyazaki weaves a story with a lot of awesome characters and some of the best animation I've seen in a long while.

    To cut to the most controversial point, the film does NOT attempt to make Japan's actions or the actions of the Axis Powers seem just, even going as far as some of the characters saying "if Japan does this, we will burn."
    The movie does not attempt to separate right and wrong in WWII, but focuses on a much more personal tale of a man's ambitions to build beautiful planes.

    On a lighter note, the film is brilliantly animated and directed. The dreams of the protagonist flow smoothly into the narrative, and the overall story and meaning is quite a bit deeper than what I expected. The English dub is also quite good, having much more voice talent than I was expecting. Overall, this movie is amazingly done, and I would even say that it should have won the Oscar over Frozen
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  13. Mar 2, 2014
    9
    Though not entirely on par with Grave of the Fireflies and Spirited Away, it is a well written and gorgeously animated film that shows the pursuit of ones dreams and the perversions that they can be subjected to, as well a fitting send off to one of the greatest animated film directors of any era.
  14. Feb 22, 2014
    3
    If you are wanting to see something like Spirited Away, etc. this movie is not in this style. I found it to be incredibly slow and boring. Not only that I am very offended a the "morality"/philosophy of the film. False history trying to make Japan the "victim" of WW2, etc. I know critics are just fanboys in love with the director since Spirited Away, etc. but this is definitely a "critics" movie and not one for the rest of us. I give it three stars just for the artwork, but that's it. Expand
  15. Mar 2, 2014
    10
    The Wind Rises was such an emotionally draining symbolic move that told a story about what it meant to follow your dreams. It was a breathtakingly graceful movie that my heart and soul fell in love with and I highly recommend the film. It was a suitable film for Hayao Miyazaki's last move.
  16. Mar 24, 2014
    5
    As a big fan of "Spirited Away" and "Howl's Moving Castle", I had high hopes for this movie. While beautiful, the length and minimal story line left me wishing I had waited until it came out for rental.
  17. Mar 1, 2014
    7
    Considered by many to be the world's greatest animator, Hayao Miyazaki (Spirited Away, Princess Mononoke, Secret World of Arrietty) claims this is his final film. He's moved away from the usual fantastical subject matter to a biography based on the designer of Japan's most lethal fighter planes. The story begins with him as a young boy, whose lyrical dreams depict his obsession with flying. When it follows his plane designer career, the story is interesting. There is a tragic subplot about the love of his life, which slows down the pacing. Thru it all are Miyazaki's sumptuous visuals: the subtle observations, the stunning landscapes, the exquisite design. Despite the simplistic script (voiced by an impressive list of American actors) and the +2hr length, this film offers a dazzling look at an innovative and magical master at work. Expand
  18. May 15, 2014
    7
    Be aware before watching 'The Wind Rises' that this is most definitely not in the same vein of some of the other more popularly known Ghibli films such as 'Spirited Away' and 'Howls Moving Castle'. The Wind Rises is much more adult and serious in tone, despite still retaining a lot of your usual Ghibli magic. This is much more similar to Grave of the Fireflies in terms of the story it has to tell.

    That said however, by looking at this comparison I feel you can see where this film does not quite stand up as one of the best Ghibli films. The film seems a little unsure about itself at times. Considering it's about the chief engineer Jiro Horikoshi who designed many Japanese fighter planes used during World War 2 it seems odd that the film chooses not to go into any depth on the moral issues of a man who would create machines used for such death and destruction. Instead the film portrays him as a rather straightforward man, kind and compassionate, with a love for creating aircraft's. Despite a few glimpses of moral doubt it felt like the film choose to pull punches in that sense, which in turn made the film feel oddly flat in tone, a movie about a serious topic, dealt with in a non-serious manner.

    This may not be one of the best Ghibli films in my opinion, but 'The Wind Rises' just goes to show that even a lesser Ghibli film is of a terribly high standard. The visuals are gorgeous, the music beautiful as always, and some scenes are truly captivating.

    I can certainly recommend 'The Wind Rises', go in with an open mind and don't expect another 'Spirited Away' and you might just love it.
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  19. Jun 23, 2014
    9
    Studio Ghibli's latest anime movie. I was totally heart broke when I heard it is Mr. Miyazaki's final movie. Then I was thoroughly prepared to enjoy every piece of it and indeed I did. What a great piece of work as being in his 70s, definitely a farewell masterpiece. A most matured movie, I mean for the first time a movie for grownups that had contents children won't fit in to enjoy from the studio as well from the director.

    It was just like the movie 'The Aviator'. A boy, Jiro Horikoshi, who aspires to contribute his skills to upgrade the aircraft technology who was actually inspired by the Italian aircraft designer Caproni. At his young age, he excels in the field that leads him to grab an opportunity to work with the nation's most renowned aircraft manufacturer. His life mixed with dreams and reality makes him a better man among his coworker. Everyone believed that he's a workaholic, but he surprises all by falling in love. The movie explained his ambition, passion towards aircrafts and his romantic life as well as the dreams that make him to believe everything is feasible.

    ‘‘Airplanes are beautiful cursed dreams...
    waiting for the sky to swallow them up’’

    There are very few so far in the history of filmmaking that animation borrowed story from biographies. This was way better than what live shot movie would have offered to the viewers. Especially this story had few dream scenes, like a fantasy that we had seen in 'The Lovely Bones'. Those were really well done, a trademark that usually we find in all of Hayao Miyazaki movies. If you are a fan of his work, then it will be a delightful 2 hour long treat for sure. I had the experience of watching this like watching the final match of the FIFA world cup. I could never ask better than this.

    Kind of inspiring theme about engineering work and a message teller about non-violence. That this movie was set during the world war, including Japan's involvement in the affair. So there were many dialogues that delivers against the idea of war, like, the famous Caproni regrets that his invention was misused in the wars. The movie had lots of smoking scenes, as it sets in and around the 20s that was fine because people did in those times. After all, like I said earlier, it is for adult, even if parents allow their kids to watch they may fall in boredom. So I see there's no controversy to drag on.

    ‘‘Engineers turn dream into reality’’

    There were few sentiments, it appeals strongly during the end portion. The end also leaves lots of questions about what could have happened afterwards, especially Jiro's Romance life. Someway it gives the impression of happy ending and in another way slightly hurts. A finely balanced grand finale. Those were the seconds (the time) I was not desired for because no more Miyazaki's movie to see afterwards. I believed the end of a great era of him and studio Ghibli together. Overall, gives the satisfaction of watching a man's true story, his romantic life, involvement in achieving the dream and got a place in his country's history. Now the director showed it to the rest of the world in a beautiful manner. Thank you Hayao Miyazaki for all your contributions, I always keep loving your great works. Enjoy your rest of the life.
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  20. Sep 1, 2014
    2
    Well, well. This is the only anime I've watched using the English dubbing. As toporAFK has already pointed out, Jiro's Japanese voice actors were terrible. It was really distracting. Usually, the English dubbing is unnecessarily high-pitched, out of character and lifeless for me; but this one wasn't that bad to be honest.

    As for the story, Miyazaki's works often involve fantastical
    people and things. Often the fantastical is more important than plot, characterization, logic or continuity. This trend continues here.

    His bone-headed insistence using "traditional" hand-drawing also shows its age. He might delude himself into thinking it's meant to evoke that classics film feeling, but I strongly feel otherwise. Having seen crisp and clean animation from Kyoto Animation, Madhouse and A-1 Pictures, I don't have any inkling to use an adjective such as classic; I will use quaint. He is past his prime as evidenced by the mishap called Ponyo.

    What a shame to end a career on a history altering piece of trash.
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  21. Mar 14, 2014
    10
    Just got home from The Wind Rises. Absolutely awesome movie. 2 hour run time, but it could have lasted days with how detailed and well crafted it was. There's not really much I can say about it, other than the fact that in my opinion, Miyazaki could not have ended his amazing feat of magical films in a better and more peaceful way than the utterly powerful thoughts and feelings brought about by his final work of art that is The Wind Rises. He has said goodbye in a realistic, and almost unnoticeable, yet very calm and respectful way. When this man passes away, the universe will kiss him goodbye, and his legacy of majesty and utterly complete understanding of the innocence of human curiosity, of all curiosity, the factor that lets us believe in magic as children, and love others as ourselves, will always be remembered by someone, and this legacy will always eventually be implemented in all of existence by some sentient being, merely because it is able, and any sentient beings will, at one point or another, experience and understand this legacy. Beauty. I would also like to express the sorrow that I feel for any others that have loved other Miyazaki films, such as My Neighbor Tortoro or Spirited Away. I am sorry that you did not see and experience the complete feeling of contentment that I did with this final, beautiful work of art and melancholy euphoria. Expand
  22. Aug 14, 2014
    10
    The Wind Rises is a very good film that is different from most of Miyazaki's movies. The plot is more realistic and steeped in history than most, and the film isn't really directed at children at all. People have pointed out certain beefs that they might have with Jiro or Naoko's personalities and character, but I don't see this as a problem because people in reality are imperfect and are unique in their own ways. To me, the film is touching and thought-provoking. I'd recommend this film to anyone. Expand
  23. Mar 30, 2014
    10
    Beautifully animated and equally beautiful in terms of story, the Wind Rises is a more than fitting end to the career of the one of the greatest animated movie directors to ever grace the screen. The characters are all well developed and likable, Jiro (the protagonist), being exceptionally well written. The story progresses in a flawless and involving manner, drawing the audience in and making them feel as if they are there. The Wind Rises also packs a strong emotional punch, not only because it is the swansong of Hayao Miyazaki, but also due to the tragic idea that the movie builds itself upon. The Wind Rises is one of the best animated movies ever created, and it's a shame it didn't earn the Academy Award this year. Expand
Metascore
83

Universal acclaim - based on 41 Critics

Critic score distribution:
  1. Positive: 37 out of 41
  2. Negative: 0 out of 41
  1. Reviewed by: Hannah Lamarque
    May 21, 2014
    80
    Unlike many of Miyazaki's previous works, The Wind Rises is a film rooted far more firmly in realism. Although it does have its fair share of fantastical dream sequences and magical flying machines.
  2. Reviewed by: Dan Jolin
    May 5, 2014
    80
    While Miyazaki’s two-hour-long, historical-melodrama swansong is destined to be his most divisive film yet, it is also his most adult and interesting, and never less than visually breathtaking throughout.
  3. Reviewed by: Mike Scott
    Feb 28, 2014
    60
    Does The Wind Rises represent Miyazaki at the top of his game? No, not really. But it could be Miyazaki at the end of the game, and that alone is reason enough to appreciate the film for the things it offers rather than hammer it too hard for the things it lacks.