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Mixed or average reviews - based on 13 Critics What's this?

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8.8

Universal acclaim- based on 5 Ratings

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  • Summary: Youssou Ndour: I Bring What I Love is a music-infused cinematic journey about the power of one man’s voice to inspire change. One of Time magazine’s100 most influential people in the world and called “the rare rock star whose music matters,” Senegalese singer Youssou Ndour is beloved internationally and at home. In 2005, the Grammy-winning artist defied expectations and produced his most personal album, Egypt, presenting his Islamic faith as a peaceable and tolerant religion. While the record received international acclaim, it was denounced as blasphemy in his native Senegal. Director Chai Vasarhelyi follows Ndour for over two years, filming in Africa, Europe, and America, to tell the story of how he faces these challenges and eventually wins over audiences both at home and abroad. (Shadow Distribution) Expand
Score distribution:
  1. Positive: 7 out of 13
  2. Negative: 0 out of 13
  1. 75
    This documentary by Elizabeth Chai Vasarhelyi could have used more music for my taste, and fewer talking heads. But it’s absorbing all the same.
  2. Reviewed by: Ann Powers
    70
    Best when exploring the nitty gritty of N'Dour's life as a musician, favorite son and cultural ambassador.
  3. Although his movie often resembles the kind of promotional video one might find as an extra on a concert DVD, N'Dour in full throttle is a sight, and sound, to behold.
  4. Though we see the same man throughout the bumpy tour captured here -- always calm, steady, faithful -- it's bound to prove an enlightening portrait for those who know him only as the guy who once worked with Peter Gabriel.
  5. Reviewed by: Nicolas Rapold
    60
    For all the singer's sincere intentions to build secular-religious bridges, a straight-up concert film might have been a better approach, especially given viewer fatigue with those musicians and their causes.
  6. When the film sticks to biographical and career background, it is on steady ground, but when it argues the case for one particular album, it becomes promotional rather than documentary material.

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