Amazon.com's Scores

  • Music
For 468 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 73% higher than the average critic
  • 4% same as the average critic
  • 23% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 4 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Music review score: 76
Highest review score: 100 SMiLE
Lowest review score: 30 Siberia
Score distribution:
  1. Negative: 1 out of 468
468 music reviews
    • 66 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    The drawback is a lack of diversity which keeps those sunny, delicious moments from having the impact they should.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    The result is an CD that sounds like it's aspiring to be something far more ambitious: a DVD, a theatrical production, even a time machine.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Minimum-Maximum is essentially a greatest-hits album with an audience applauding and occasionally shouting.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Brit-leaning space-pop that switches rhythmic gears with pleasing regularity from dreamy to driving.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    The time apart has made the Posies come back fiercer, louder and heavier.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    The Outsider may be a cut below its predecessor, the artistic, critical, and commercial breakthrough that was Fate's Right Hand--perhaps the element of surprise is gone, perhaps the songs aren't quite as sharp, perhaps it's just not possible to catch lightning in a bottle twice in a row--but that was a tough act to follow, and this one's none too shabby.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Why Should the Fire Die? is certainly the trio's boldest and most creative album, albeit one that might not appeal to their earliest fans.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Some of their best work in nearly two decades.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    His most straightforward country music to date.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Somewhere Down in Texas could have benefited from the addition of an irresistible rhythm tune or another example of the western swing that Strait embraced so fervently early in his career.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    The album isn't without its problems––come the halfway mark ("Sons of Plunder") vocalist David Draiman and his mates lapse into the expected, with a series of songs that are good but rarely as remarkable as those found in Act I.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    A little more subdued than the songs on its firecracker debut, Make Out?, yes, but hardly lacking brains or bite.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    The amazing thing is not that there are still so many unreleased tunes in the solo Pollard/ GBV vaults, but how engaging this stuff is despite fidelity that at times is atrocious.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    29
    He continues to take chances and not all of them pay off.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Although this isn't the masterpiece that the self-titled Black Mountain disc was, it certainly gives devotees lots more music to listen to until their next disc comes around.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    You'd buy this album for the same reason you buy Robyn Hitchcock, for the observations, sardonic-ism, and sarcasm--not to mention Eef's singular, strained voice.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    More skilled than the debut, Lunatico is no sophomore slump, though hardcore house music fans may want to wait for remixes.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    All in all, this is a calmer Truckers set, less ragged and more polished.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Garcia and company wear their '80s influences proudly throughout, yet bring enough fresh ideas to the mix to avoid being mere slaves to precious retro-fashion.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Each [song] is epic (and not in the bad Creed "arms-spread-on-the-mountaintop" way): packing in more drama, billowing guitar solos and stealth pop hooks than the Strokes' entire back catalog.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    The darkest, most mysterious album of his career.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    It's as if they peeled away a layer or two in order to reveal more of the pop band beneath the off-kilter country-rock trappings.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    What's changed is that maturity has granted Jewel, now in her early 30s, greater perspective.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Like so many all-star bands before them, The Raconteurs could be one and done. But don't place the blame on this fertile and genuine debut.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    On first listen, Taking the Long Way seems too somber--in need of a bit of levity and more than a couple of uptempo songs (like the sexy, '60s-flavored "I Like It") to resonate for the long haul. It also seems to lack the writing quality that Darrell Scott, Patty Griffin, and Bruce Robison brought to Home. But on repeated plays, those concerns dissipate.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Solid songs all, delivered with a muscular vocal conviction that does considerably more than merely sell them.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Get past the more pedestrian fare like "Yes/No" and "Return of the Berserker," and the full scope of the Futureheads' ambition reveals itself, particularly in the poppiest track, "Skip To The End."
    • 73 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    For all of the music's surface catchiness, the writing is some of Moorer's deepest to date.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Free to Stay is loaded with complex harmonies and awesome distorted keyboard sounds (hey, this is what Quasi were supposed to sound like!).
    • 54 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    The result is an energetic paean to the Cars' power-pop heritage, capturing the band's classic feel-good vibe with all cynical subtexts intact.