Austin Chronicle's Scores

For 1,571 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 40% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 58% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 4.1 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Music review score: 68
Highest review score: 100 Wincing The Night Away
Lowest review score: 20 Rockferry
Score distribution:
1,571 music reviews
    • 85 Metascore
    • 89 Critic Score
    An album that absolutely cannot be ignored.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 89 Critic Score
    One listen, and you'll be hooked.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 89 Critic Score
    In the years to come, Low will trudge onward across the vast tundra of gross underappreciation, but in retrospect, their canon will likely be seen as one of the most important and influential of our time, so you might want to start paying attention.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 89 Critic Score
    Giddy, confident, and instantly memorable, The Remote Part is great Brit pop and great rock & roll.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 89 Critic Score
    This is breathtaking, life-affirming music with the power to heal and restore. It's that beautiful.
    • 89 Metascore
    • 89 Critic Score
    Since I Left You is as much of a revelation now as Primal Scream's life-changing Screamadelica was a decade ago.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 89 Critic Score
    The dramatic, melancholy undercurrents of string-driven pop nuggets "The Drowning Years" and "Never Look at the Sun" showcase the Delgados as the smart, cutting-edge descendents of the Carpenters: everything Belle & Sebastian want to be, but are too damn precocious to pull off.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 89 Critic Score
    Let's just hope it doesn't take another near-death experience for their next album to be this good.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 89 Critic Score
    The Costello formula takes over: minimalist but experimental instrumentation, eternally durable vocals, and literate punk-wave bittersweetening.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 89 Critic Score
    The disc alternates between unsettling, exhilarating, and devastating in its emotional impact; it's also difficult not to get distracted by everything going on musically.
    • 91 Metascore
    • 89 Critic Score
    No chips or cracks in this debut's silly-grin inducing veneer, just one short, sharp jolt of postmodern skank.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 89 Critic Score
    By the Way is orchestral, taunting, sinister, beatific, rousing, jocular, nervy, ethereal, and dare I say it, mature.
    • 97 Metascore
    • 89 Critic Score
    "Black Dog" and "Over the Hills and Far Away" back-to-back are gonzo.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 89 Critic Score
    Great albums are great from the very first note, and the first 10 seconds of Walking With Thee will stop you dead in your tracks.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 89 Critic Score
    Much of Play sounds like it was beamed directly from planet Sad Guy, but it's far and away Moby's most cohesive and affecting work to date.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 89 Critic Score
    Any rock album that tackles such a wide spectrum without compromising the music deserves respect.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 89 Critic Score
    A deeply personal album that will resonate with anyone who's ever found their life's path leading them down a dead end.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 89 Critic Score
    After a while -- a familiarity period if you will -- it becomes clear that these songs are not only fully realized, they're damn near brilliant.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 89 Critic Score
    With Showtime, the very idea of diagramming a single line is enough to cause black wormholes to open in the listener's mind – quantum physics by way of South London slang.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 89 Critic Score
    Ultimately, it all plays out like a 60-minute calling card that illustrates hip-hop's most liberal producers aren't afraid to keep on keepin' on.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 89 Critic Score
    The Black Album stands up alongside Reasonable Doubt and The Blueprint as Z's most ambitious work.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 89 Critic Score
    The whole much greater than its parts, Dead Cities is creation imbued and then muted again.
    • 97 Metascore
    • 89 Critic Score
    Kudos to White's preservation of Lynn's loving, narrative songwriting even when paired with his own grittier sensibilities. In doing so, the two unlikely bedfellows have cut a classic.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 89 Critic Score
    Every emotion is intense and genuine, and the musicianship is just as moving as Mercer's lyrics.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 89 Critic Score
    American Idiot is one of the most politically volatile albums to come out since the ascension of the Accidental President. It's also the best album of Green Day's 12-year career.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 89 Critic Score
    Their robe is cut from cloth that matters: melodic Peter Hook-like basslines; the divine shoegazer textures of My Bloody Valentine and Ride; a peppy, Strokes-like bounce; and a singer who's a dead ringer for Ian Curtis.
    • 91 Metascore
    • 89 Critic Score
    The first hip-hop classic of the new millennium.
    • 100 Metascore
    • 89 Critic Score
    Sketchy sound quality (on The Vanilla Tapes), to be sure, but its rawness makes the final product that much more impressive.
    • 93 Metascore
    • 89 Critic Score
    Not only does it capture the unstructured verse of a masked maniac within a sheer net of plausibility, it parades his inner dementia among instrumental adornments of the highest order.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 89 Critic Score
    For the fan-atic, WTLO's scrapbooklike discography unveils both a gold mine of (still) unreleased material and the Seattle trio's penchant for dashing off B-sides, tributes, and noise at the smash of a guitar.