Baltimore Sun's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
For 1,998 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 55% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 42% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 1.2 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Movie review score: 63
Highest review score: 100 The Boys of Baraka
Lowest review score: 0 Margot at the Wedding
Score distribution:
1,998 movie reviews
  1. Without a single gunshot (and just one flick of a switchblade), it turns into an existential suspense film with the highest stakes imaginable: the survival of the human spirit.
  2. As the film opens with, predictably, "Vertigo" and its "Hello, Hello" refrain, it's his steady presence and unforced charisma that anchors each performance, allowing Bono to emote for all he's worth.
  3. This movie has a tone, look and mood all its own - it's a joyously bittersweet piece of visual music about isolation, melancholy and everyone's yearning for transcendence, through love, art or both.
  4. The Counterfeiters is in its own smart, trim fashion "The Bridge on the River Kwai" of concentration-camp sagas. Also based (like Kwai) on a real-life story, this movie starts small but becomes a miniature epic of overreach and moral drift.
  5. As a writer-director, McCarthy, like the characters and the places that he suffuses with emotion, has poetry in him - and he knows how to let it out. He has a talent for demarcating those spaces in which characters can become whoever they want to be.
  6. A glorious medieval war movie. It's about war as the ultimate pitch of conflict that tries men's souls, and women's, too.
  7. Though I love McCarthy's movie, The Edge of Heaven - with its virtuoso narrative and frames packed to bursting with unruly life - has the potency of "The Visitor" squared.
  8. The movie does work, spectacularly.
  9. The documentary American Teen is the most realistic movie you will see all summer.
  10. One of the favorite sayings of journalists and politicians is "You don't want to see how the sausage is made." Marsh's movie says you do want to see how a miracle is made, even if the details can be just as unsavory.
  11. Enraging and inspiring. It boasts the miraculous quality of finding a letter in a bottle and discovering that its authors are alive.
  12. It's exhilarating in an authentic, pathos-streaked way to see Kearns, through Greg Kinnear's inspired characterization of a wary obsessive, representing himself during his trial against Ford Motor Co. for stealing his design.
  13. Hathaway carries you on an emotional whirligig that can be horrifying and funny, hopeful and devastating.
  14. British director Mike Leigh has made the first great comedy for our new depression.
  15. Slumdog Millionaire dives headfirst into something greater than a subculture - the enormous unchronicled culture of India's mega-slums - and achieves even more sweeping impact.
  16. At last, a great contemporary holiday movie that's strictly for grown-ups - a holiday movie that really is a moviegoer's holiday from desultory daily fare.
  17. Brad Pitt's sensitive performance helps make 'Benjamin Button' a timeless masterpiece.
  18. The Class ranks with the very best films ever made about teaching, and it's unlike any English or American film about teaching ever made.
  19. Views war from the inside out and the outside in. It carries the shock of full disclosure.
  20. Nothing is as it seems in State of Play, a crackerjack political thriller in which no individual, profession or institution gets away clean.
  21. Up
    Everything about Up is an up, in the most visceral and poetic ways.
  22. For Americans, Gomorrah will play like every other Mafia epic - and no other Mafia epic.
  23. As magical as it is realistic.
  24. Uproarious, moving and thrilling.
  25. What emerges is a fallen warrior's tale: the inside story of a man bloodied and bowed.
  26. The Hurt Locker redefines war-film electricity.
  27. A scary movie that's also funny, touching and good for you.
  28. Best of all, Ponyo never ceases to be a genuine odyssey in short pants.
  29. It's cathartic and exhilarating.
  30. You'll never see a more tactile expression of the intimacy between artists and their instruments than in Davis Guggenheim's elating It Might Get Loud.

Top Trailers