BBC Music's Scores

  • Music
For 1,831 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 68% higher than the average critic
  • 4% same as the average critic
  • 28% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 1.8 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Music review score: 73
Highest review score: 100 What's Going On [40th Anniversary Edition]
Lowest review score: 20 If Not Now, When?
Score distribution:
  1. Negative: 7 out of 1831
1,831 music reviews
    • 75 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Propellor Time is, in short, another fine Robyn Hitchcock album, proving that, almost 35 years into his recording career, his gift for crafting such perfectly-imperfect, winningly-askew pop as strong as ever.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The pair can knock out enormous, memorable hooks from limited resources, the instrumental make-up stripped-bare in the extreme, just drums and guitar. But scarcity of equipment never once hinders their considerable ambition and inventiveness.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The spacious production lends The Wonder Show… an appealing as-live feeling, an intimacy that Oldham has often turned to his advantage in the past and does so again here.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    In its own right, The Fear... is an impressive piece of work. As inevitable as comparisons with their previous creations are, they shouldn’t detract from what is by anyone else’s standards a major achievement
    • 79 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The Wild Hunt is a heady and enthralling work, its impressionistic nature bolstered by levels of charm and confidence found all too rarely in these modern times.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Quite who Harlem can hope to appeal to, in the UK at least, when music fans here are evidently besotted with sci-fi nonsense one minute and cleverly articulated kitchen-sink dramas the next is anyone's guess. Best to quit the questioning, though, and get down with the rollicking jams they're kicking out regardless of how many people are listening.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    There is, unquestionably, a mass of fortitude at work from the creator throughout.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Intimate, intense and up close with the openly flamboyant Wainwright as he offers up himself with no full band to hide behind. It works, too.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Cancer Bats’ tendency to veer towards the metallic might shock those unaccustomed to having a sweaty Torontonian screaming blue murder in their faces. But persevere and it reveals itself as a selection of dark, enjoyably violent treats.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    La La Land is so warm and easy to like, it triumphs over any misgivings.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Nobody's Daughter, despite its lengthy and troubled gestation, is a rich and emotionally searing addition to that canon, effortlessly besting her haphazard solo album.
    • BBC Music
    • 78 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The Radio Dept. have cleverly managed to conjure up music with a thoroughly minimal feel, despite this hive of activity instrumentation-wise.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Tears, Lies, and Alibis is an album worth buying mainly for two reasons. Firstly the opening track, Rains Came. It sits in what sounds like a familiar bed, but doesn't quite go where you expect it to, and is, this time, lyrically opaque. Secondly, you can drown in her voice. It is fabulous; not an in-your-face "listen to how many octaves I can leap" sort of way, but it effortlessly convinces you she's lived this stuff, and means every word.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Throughout, Avi's vocals coalesce remarkably with those of keyboard player Rebecca Coleman, who was originally Avi's muse by way of an intense teenage crush.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    By evolving their formula without losing sight of the elements that it’s founded upon, they have delivered their most satisfyingly ferocious set to date.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Peggy Sue have firmly moved from kooky and wonky soul-smith-stresses to blazing a path through fully realised songs waging war with life.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    This latest record also goes some way to proving that, while he may be an old dog with a pickled onion for a head, Mark E. Smith and The Fall are still capable of learning the odd new trick.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Because in constantly mutating just when you begin to pin it down, drawing everything around in before rearranging atoms before your very eyes, Cosmogramma proves itself time and time again as mind-meltingly boundless as a black hole.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    These 11 tracks flow fantastically, sounding like products of a focused period of writing and recording, completed over a relatively short space of time.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Nevertheless, what the album lacks in depth, it more than makes up for in the length and breadth of Weller's imagination.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    He clearly relishes the heightened emotion of his source material, the album wisely avoiding cheap campiness in favour of respecting the music's rich sense of drama.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Latin, the band's third album, is something of a side-step from its predecessors, Holy Fuck (2004) and LP (2007). It's less brawny and statelier, perhaps in part due to its producers Paul Epworth (Florence, The Rapture) and Dave Sardy (Black Mountain, LCD). But it might well be the closest the band has got to sounding as visceral and as rich on record as they do live.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Although the parallels with Bonobo's peers are obvious, his fourth album doesn't just sit in their shadows. Rather, it's an inspiring example of how, free of pressure and publicity, he has blossomed into something beautiful at his own pace.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    A genuine great leap forward, Defamation is a cracker.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    It’s Thomas’s guilt-free love of mavericks past that lends such evocative warmth and unusual spontaneity to a fascinating album that could have been pure self-indulgence.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Total Life Forever's break with the past is astutely judged, the execution is even better.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    An extension of the rehabilitation that the 63-year-old has undergone in the last decade, under the devoted guidance of family and friends, it's a record that both addresses and somehow transcends his past.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Brimful of air guitar moments and other guilty pleasures, Brothers is pleasingly diverse and diverting, with barely a duff track.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    it's disappointing that collaborative projects featuring prominent artists from these fields haven't yet delivered a worthwhile album. Marley's 2005 release Welcome to Jamrock was a step forwards, but Distant Relatives represents an accomplished attempt to go further, fusing traits with few discernable flaws.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Though Compass initially seems like the least interesting song on the album, that’s the beauty of the surprises in store.