Blurt Magazine's Scores

  • Music
For 1,059 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 56% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 41% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 0.2 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Music review score: 72
Highest review score: 100 Spirit in the Room
Lowest review score: 20 That's Why God Made the Radio
Score distribution:
  1. Negative: 3 out of 1059
1,059 music reviews
    • 82 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    Despite the variety, this is a decidedly marginal set of songs, one that’s well out of sync with even the most archival Americana.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Apparently Cartwright exorcised his punk rock demons with Desperation, as Shattered is the band’s most accessible record yet.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    Lanegan doesn’t need someone to make him great, he does fine by himself and it shows with the anthology of his solo work Has God Seen My Shadow?- An Anthology 1989-2011 (Light in the Attic).
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Weird Little Birthday is one of those albums that sounds like nothing much the first couple times you hear it, before you begin to lock onto the war between musical ease and lyrical dislocation.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Yellow & Green documents the evolution of Baroness from great metal band to great band.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    With U feels fresh, new and mysterious.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    If Hit Parade doesn't get Nourallah on more folk's radar well, their radar is done busted.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Temple Beautiful is the product you expect from this highly original and creative artist.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    As always, Russell's articulate arrangements embolden the material and give them the grit it deserves.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    America, is the most fully formed and thought-out of his albums, perfectly joining his concept of a free-form punk mentality with classically influenced structure and arrangement.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The album is not flawless; there are one or two songs that don’t quite hit the high bar Atkins set for herself with this outing. But songs like the drinks-in-the-air sing-along “It’s Only Chemistry” and the instant classic “Sin Song” more than make up for what you pay for this album.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    Immunity pounds and pulses with pneumatic energy, its rhythmic tracks (“Collider” but also “Open Eye Signal”) gleaming with machine-precise hedonism.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    What he has done here is more than a lark. He really loves what he’s singing, and it shows. And he has a lot still to teach us about the joys of music.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    There are new elements here, but they've been brought into a foundation so strong they cannot help but fit in on only on Yo La Tengo's terms.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    While some of the beats seem recycled from Thursday or House of Balloons they still sound good and don't detract from the songs [here].
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Gentle introspection--instead of the outright melancholy he often exudes--paired with sway-worthy melodies make Parallax the most listenable Atlas Sound album to date.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    Time Off takes its time getting where it’s going, but deftly reaches its destination.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Once again, The War on Drugs have crafted an album of the year, built not upon flash or novelty, but a new take on traditional rock and roll that is always pushing forward.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    With Easy Pain, the trio go full fang on this fourth LP, harkening back to the most extreme aspects of Louisville loudness.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    There are certainly times when a bit more instrumentation (a cello, some percolating percussion, a lyrical guitar solo) would have enhanced the presentation.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Only 8 songs here so they don’t wear out their welcome and know how to keep the fans wanting more.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Cut the World isn't a major new statement from Antony Hegarty, since only one of its 11 songs are new and he's no stranger to using string arrangements. But the material is mostly the cream of his four studio albums.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    There's power in these grooves, but there's a message too, and it spells a better day for everyone.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Vile’s drawl communicates isolation with a contradictory urgency. Somehow, Pretty’s spiritual resignation sounds like an invitation.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The whole project is haunted by mournfulness and death. And that of course suits a Nico tribute well.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    The raw, mellow, hip-hop, electronic, jazz infused solo return of Neneh Cherry is an enjoyable ride; some songs are immediately addictive while others slowly become more appealing after several listens and sonic osmosis.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Call it a comeback. Call it a rebirth. Welcome back Barrence. Dig Thy Savage Soul rocks.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    Populated with smartly crafted, passionately performed songs, No Way There From Here stands as Cantrell’s best work to date and leaves the listener hoping that she doesn’t take as many years to make do her follow-up album.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    What he does best is craft heart-string cautionary tales.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    There’s a Bluebird in My Heart is the sound of a great artist coming back home.