Boston Globe's Scores

For 5,034 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 55% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 43% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 1 point higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Movie review score: 62
Highest review score: 100 To Be and to Have
Lowest review score: 0 Bratz
Score distribution:
5,034 movie reviews
  1. Risks seeming too earnestly therapeutic for its own good. But what makes My First Mister a successful feature directing debut for Lahti is the emotional veracity it summons.
  2. It's also a message movie, about as weighty as Lara Flynn Boyle and twice as absurd. But I'd like to report that I had an excellent time.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 75 Critic Score
    More than a predictable self-discovery yarn about the caterpillar that turns into a beautiful butterfly.
  3. Boldly goes where Hollywood rarely treads: into the passionate, intense, and complex world of girls at the point in their lives when self-discovery is combined with enormous vulnerability.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 75 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    To appreciate Solaris, the new film by Steven Soderbergh, it helps to downshift your moviegoing metabolism to a level approaching the cryogenically frozen: The movie's that cerebral, that contemplative, that slow.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 75 Critic Score
    Raimi crafted a complicated hero who is a welcome relief from the usual two-dimensional offerings. That said, we could use some moxie in the sequel.
  4. A clever, affectionate, and entertaining holiday snack for sci-fi fans. Falling somewhere between slick and cheesy.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 75 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    Sweet little crowd-pleaser.
  5. Delivers chunks of ''Yellow Submarine'' and ''The Phantom Tollbooth'' -- a vividly timeless oddity suitable for many children and most stoners.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 75 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    One hell of a party, and it doesn't let anything get in the way of that.
  6. Not only reminds us that there's a little larceny in all of us, it reminds us how much fun it can be to commune with our inner thieves.
  7. Good clean dirty fun.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 75 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    A damn-near great end-of-the-world zombie movie, terrifying on the basic heebie-jeebie level, respectful toward its B-movie forebears, and all the more unnerving for coming out in this fretful era of SARS and germ warfare.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 75 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    The most consistently funny of the ''Austin Powers'' films.
  8. Begins with that invigoratingly nervy and imaginative buzz. But its chic indictment of empty materialist values fizzles.
  9. In a summer in which every blockbuster is zealous to be a video game, Rodriguez, with a wink, has produced his own.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 75 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    The film's most natural appeal is to adolescent athletes -- in particular, cleat-wearing young ladies who will bask in its hard-won girl-power message. This is a movie with bruised shins and a huge heart.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 75 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    The movie also rather sweetly suggests that the apartment being shared is Europe itself. There's a reason this warm, stylish human comedy was a big hit all across the Continent: It conveys a new generation's conviction that borders no longer matter.
  10. As ambitious as this may be, however, the movie's objectives tax its energy even as the girls' plight tears at your heart.
  11. Bay's movie is also a confident mega-production that feels it doesn't need to lean on its visual frills if it has Smith and Lawrence -- it's a natural-born buddy flick.
  12. The movie's glee is contagious.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 75 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    As Hopkins's Lecter is concerned, it's official: He's Freddy Krueger.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 75 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    It's that central dance between teacher and student that makes the movie both hard to watch and worth your attention - a subtle waltz of power in which it's difficult to tell who's leading until too late.
  13. Because Manito is really just an opera without the violins or Viking hats, you probably don't need to have everything spelled out. Its Spanish-English script is secondary to the universal language and timeless drama of family, community, dreams made and dreams dashed.
    • 32 Metascore
    • 75 Critic Score
    A clever satire that's layered like a breakfast club sandwich with sly in-jokes, sight gags, gross-out scenes, and, of course, requisite bathroom humor.
  14. Very much a genre picture, relying on notions of suspense, surprise, and comeuppance. Indeed, at the center of this movie is a question of whether what we're seeing is really to be believed.
  15. The movie star Julie Christie turned 62 last month, and anyone under the impression that she merely floated through her prime heedless of the age in which she worked should catch her in A Decade Under the Influence.
  16. As rich and literary a work as you might expect.
  17. Witherspoon is a professional, demanding we give ourselves over to her carbonated pluck.
  18. This third installment is the loudest, dopiest, and least inventive of the three. But what the movie...lacks in intelligence it makes up for in sheer doom.
  19. A powerful portrait of modern journalism and the nobility -- and futility -- of chronicling modern war.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 75 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    Still: The Hours is a book about people writing, reading, and living another book, and that literariness makes the movie resist itself.
  20. Kate Hudson and Matthew McConaughey don't simply star in this movie; they tag-team it out of the Freddie Prinze Jr. --Julia Stiles puppy-love ghetto.
  21. The kind of film you've got to admire simply for the way it squares its shoulders and plunges into a message of unfashionable idealism.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 75 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    Freaky Friday version 2003 is a shinier, snappier animal, partly because young girls now dress like Avril Lavigne, and partly because Jamie Lee Curtis has her best role in years and knows it.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 75 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    There isn't much to The Housekeeper, really, but it plumbs depths of male unease that louder and less wise movies strain to reach.
  22. Plays like a college version of ''When Harry Met Sally.''
  23. The coolest animation in town.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 75 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    Short, suspenseful, funny, and profane, the film's a throwback to the neat little B-level thrillers the entertainment industry used to crank out by the dozen in the post- World War II era and the early days of TV.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 75 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    Pirates offers something for everyone: Bloom and Depp for the ladies, big action and Knightley for the men, self-aware gags for the postmodern crowd, Depp and Rush for fans of top-rank scenery chewing.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 75 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    In the end, Seabiscuit gets right the things that matter.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 75 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    Like last year's Inuit sensation ''The Fast Runner,'' the Maori drama Whale Rider is based on a folk myth, and it's told with an elemental timelessness that feels like a swan dive into prehistory.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 75 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    If it were any more real - if it were Imax, say -- the audience would be molting.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 75 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    This is very much the bargain that Northfork offers an audience: Buy into the brothers' elegiac meditation on angels, Eden, and the death of American innocence or sit back and scoff at it as so much David Lynch lite.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 75 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    Expect Demonlover to become a midnight-movie staple in the coming years. And expect shards of it to roil your dreams for weeks.
  24. The movie's narrative can be taxingly ornate, but there's something beautiful about its metaphorical conflation of politics and glamour, the real and the fictional.
  25. Sayles seems to be trying, single-handedly, to correct centuries of First World self-centeredness in Third World contexts.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 75 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    Less a documentary than a cry of outrage -- a series of exotic images that slowly turn horrifying.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 75 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    You come away enchanted less by the character than by the woman playing her.
  26. What the movie lacks in ambition, originality, and grit, it makes up for in pure feeling.
  27. Mercifully, The Station Agent is not about how these misfits heal one another -- they're not that miserable, for one thing. It's about the unlikely ways proximity, need, and coincidence create friendships.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 75 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    This is at bottom a pulp thriller that strains -- sometimes pretentiously, at other times with gutter magnificence -- to reach the level of basic human truths.
  28. The film is touchingly firm about leveling with children, drawing a careful, crucial line between fantasy and reality, without patronizing or haranguing them.
  29. The film is often at odds with itself as a sincere work of romantic comedy, as Wilder's sometimes were, too. Nonetheless, it's determined to keep Clooney's considerable comedic skills front and center. He's never been looser, sexier, or more antic.
  30. Engrossing, smartly made documentary.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 75 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    The closest cinematic approximation to a beach novel that money and skill can buy.
  31. At heart, Sylvia is constructed as a psychological suspense film framed around the ambiguities of Hughes's infidelity and Plath's resulting paranoia. So at its strangest, the movie is a potboiler.
  32. Documentary filmmaker Liz Garbus spent three years shooting two teenagers living in a Maryland juvenile detention center. The completed film is called Girlhood and it feels as much a work in progress as its two troubled subjects do.
  33. Busch combines French absurdist theater and American performance art with a drag queen's flamboyant wit.
  34. Shattered Glass, with its dumb title, is smart about good vs. evil. Incidentally, the good is Lane, who now works at The Washington Post and was a consultant on this picture.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 75 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    Revolutions, the final installment in the trilogy, parcels things more neatly. You get 45 minutes of the Wachowskis' patented theosophical bong water, followed by an hour of the most muscular, hard-core special-effects rama-lama yet to hit the screen. Only then does Jesus show up.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 75 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    Mao had it wrong; in ''Revolution,'' political power comes out of the barrel of a TV tube.
  35. Elf
    The movie sets Ferrell's assaultive and juvenile physical comedy in a less-combative playground, and the result might leave the Ferrell-intolerant exiting the theater on a high.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 75 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    In My Skin takes that pain/pleasure principle and magnifies it until you're either dumbstruck or running screaming from the theater.
  36. Earle's song introductions, like those of his mentors Townes Van Zandt and Guy Clark, are as meaty, pointed, and touching as the tunes themselves, and his spoken words -- full of humor and humanity -- are the heart of the film.
  37. The film is faithful to its absurdities, sometimes hilariously so.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 75 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    The joy is in the details, and they are unrelentingly comic.
  38. The movie is like an extra-strength episode of MTV's ''Diary,'' which is like ''A&E Biography'' in the first person. Only ''Resurrection'' has a subject who's been dead for six years.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 75 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    A honey, but your response to it may depend on where you fall on life's big curve.
  39. There's scarcely any dialogue, and the "hukkle" sound is universal enough to make subtitles unnecessary and to please an audience of any age and attention span.
  40. The performances by Plotnick, Leupp, and Roberson comprise a jarring special effect.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 75 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    Looks brilliant while you're watching it and stands revealed as counterfeit only in the strong light of day. What Baldwin does, though, is the stuff of supporting actor Oscars.
  41. It takes almost an hour for The Legend of Leigh Bowery to make a case for Bowery's sort of genius, and in the last third, the movie gives a real sense of what made him him.
  42. A tidy soap opera. But it's a discreet, warmly made one, too. In a show of restraint, the intrigue never rises above mildly juicy.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 75 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    Even if you think Cruise has never had a moment of doubt in his life, he makes Nathan's self-loathing palpable, and the character's regeneration has a hoarse, cautious purposefulness that's striking.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 75 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    Dancing on the edge of dullness, ''Girl'' is continually saved by the look of things: the hush of an atelier in midafternoon, dust-motes swirling in a sunbeam, pigment blooming under mortar and pestle. Impatience is forestalled, time and again, by rapture.
  43. Part Marxist social drama and part Michael Moore corporation-needling, with fed-up residents trying to outsmart the big, bad naive company to keep their lights on for free.
  44. The reliable Mike Newell directs Mona Lisa Smile with such assurance that the important moments are never mawkish or dull, and he encourages the women to act with absolute conviction.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 75 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    A gruesome, helpless spiral barely saved by an actress locating humanity where few would have cared to bother.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 75 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    All Peter Pan lacks is a Peter Pan with any discernible personality, no matter that Jeremy Sumpter is the first actual, genetic boy to play the role on film.
  45. If Millennium Mambo is the only chance to see Hou Hsaio-hsien's work at a movie theater, you'd better take it.
  46. Aileen is Broomfield working compassionately. Perhaps it's only because he knows he can't save Wuornos that he can offer her as she might have been: part wounded animal, part self-destructive martyr, and all tragedy.
  47. Demonstrates an idiosyncratic human touch. Kon is unafraid of the unseemly and unsightly. People are captured as they really might be.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 75 Critic Score
    Sometimes it gets into arcane talk of equipment that makes more sense for a Berklee College of Music engineering class than for a mass-market movie -- but as a probing look at a really nice-guy genius in the studio world, it succeeds admirably.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 75 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    Less striking for its storyline than for the world it presents -- a rural moonscape of coal-dust, casual environmental disaster, and atavistic behavior.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 75 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    The Dreamers isn't that bad -- actually, it's funny, affecting, interestingly twisted, and seriously erotic before it heads south in the final stretch.
  48. The last word in good-time mayhem.
  49. In Robot Stories, technology hasn't colonized human life, it's finding ways to make living (and loving) better.
  50. Lively and beautiful filmmaking. It may leave you scratching your head, but it shouldn't leave you cold.
  51. Gathers a sort of darkness as it comes to its oblique conclusion.
  52. What's unique about this documentary is that it grips history with both hands, shakes it, examines it, and exits with the entire wrinkled contents bravely in tow.
  53. There is a lot to recommend about James' Journey to Jerusalem. Its people are not among them. This searing little parable contains some of the more deplorable folks you're likely to see in a movie about faith.
  54. A jokey, junky potboiler.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 75 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    When Spartan is good, it's surprisingly gripping and fresh, and when it's bad, it's just another overcooked Hollywood paranoid thriller.
  55. This intimate, warmly made family portrait always feels true. The performances are particularly good.
  56. It is at least an "experience" that has to be labeled exhilarating.
    • 89 Metascore
    • 75 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    This is the art-film Carrey: repressed, lovesick, unshaven. Essentially he's doing the same intellectual sad sack played by John Cusack in "Malkovich" and Nicolas Cage in "Adaptation"
    • 64 Metascore
    • 75 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    Could fairly be described as a Robert Altman ensemble movie without the flab, or "Magnolia" with a mean streak and bigger laughs.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 75 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    The film's comic observations are rich, droll, and more than a little sad: Everyone in this isolated community seems beaten down by life.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 75 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    This is a film lover's film, and as if to underscore the point, Bon Voyage opens and closes in a movie theater.

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