Boston Globe's Scores

For 5,170 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 55% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 43% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 0.7 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Movie review score: 62
Highest review score: 100 Elephant
Lowest review score: 0 All About Steve
Score distribution:
5,170 movie reviews
    • 76 Metascore
    • 88 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    May not be the best movie ever made about the perils of family life, but it is among the most ruthlessly comic.
  1. Moore's roving essay feels even more urgent now than it did when the jury had to make up an award to honor it at the Cannes film festival in May.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 88 Critic Score
    It is Bowie's alter ego as the androgynous Martian rock star that remains, 30 years later, his most enduring artistic achievement.
  2. That commendable sense of balance, which Dolgin and Franco use to approach this family reunion, ultimately makes the finished product devastating.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 88 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    Screenwriter Kaufman is in fine meta-fettle here, even if he's still losing control of his material toward the end, and while it's too soon to tell whether Clooney has the stuff of a great director, he certainly knows who to hire.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 88 Critic Score
    Richly allusive and eloquently stylized.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 88 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    The thread that winds through their stories is love lost and connections found, but only the audience is able to weave it into something to keep.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 88 Critic Score
    Earnhart's fundamental compassion toward his subjects elevates a riveting work that feels like a hybrid of ''Crumb'' and ''Nashville,'' with maybe a side of ''King of the Hill'' tossed on the barbecue.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 88 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    The ''R'' rating is understandable, but absurd. This is a family film in the most complicated and, ultimately, most cheering sense.
  3. In ''Trials,'' Hitchens is almost endearing, stalking Kissinger from one event to the next like a bleary-eyed Michael Moore.
  4. Proves acutely subtle. But its question of what we forgive art in the face of atrocity and immorality is one for the ages.
  5. Roughly translated, Touchez pas au Grisbi means ''don't touch the loot.'' But in literal terms, this film version of Albert Simonin's blockbuster really couldn't care less who ends up with the cash.
  6. An upsetting landmark. Don't take the children.
    • Boston Globe
    • 54 Metascore
    • 88 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    Watching Gus Van Sant's Gerry is the cinematic equivalent of watching paint dry. I mean that as high praise.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 88 Critic Score
    Does a terrific job of evoking the electric magic of an extraordinary era.
  7. The best movie Steven Seagal never made. Except that Statham, while just as marked for death, is harder to kill.
  8. The kind of richly layered film that Hollywood seldom attempts, much less brings off. But it's more than brought off here in grand, solid style and beautifully crafted detail.
  9. Resonates with intelligence and a poignancy made more sorrowful by what happened to all of us, but especially to New Yorkers, on that terrible day.
    • Boston Globe
    • 71 Metascore
    • 88 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    The most playful film to come out of the French New Wave, it's also the last time Jean-Luc Godard appeared to have any fun.
  10. Delightful and original, the film conjures up a corner of Paris distinct and specific, yet fairy-tale fanciful.
    • Boston Globe
  11. It is an uncompromising family tale, one that's dark but lyrical and moving in its rendering of the ties that bind even the most dysfunctional families, despite valiant efforts to destroy them.
    • Boston Globe
    • 75 Metascore
    • 88 Critic Score
    Poetic, surreal, and curiously powerful.
    • Boston Globe
  12. There's nothing paltry about its poultry.
    • Boston Globe
  13. Souffle-light and airily playful.
    • Boston Globe
    • 68 Metascore
    • 88 Critic Score
    This is art paying homage to art.
  14. Nicholson, Hunt, and Kinnear will win you over as they turn the film into a valentine to New York's walking wounded.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 88 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    Across the board, the performances testify, often hilariously, to the pain these characters feel and inflict but are incapable of expressing.
  15. From start to finish there's a shimmer of discovery about it - our discovery of it, Coppola's discovery of how much she can do.
  16. Hollywood filmmaking at its best, brimming over with feeling, texture, spirit, and several kinds of keenness that transmute experience into big pop myth.
    • Boston Globe
  17. Intimidated by the words "avant-garde film"? Then hand yourself over, without reservation, to the skills of documentarian Martina Kudlacek and her astonishingly accessible primer, In the Mirror of Maya Deren.
  18. lluminating and exceptional docu-portrait.
  19. A bleak road movie that often ambles. But its many moments of poetic grace make this haunting and harrowing journey a rewarding one.
  20. As savage and as epic as film gets.
  21. It's the kind of romantic comedy that doesn't cheapen the word ''heartwarming.''
  22. Awash in strangeness, a poem that details what it's like to be 13 at the end of a millennium.
  23. You walk out amazed and refreshed by the way it kicks the assumptions out from under the genre.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 88 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    The filmmakers are smart to cut between their primary interview and later footage of Junge watching that interview and offering further commentary -- living footnotes, as it were.
  24. A rarity among modern movies: a coming-of-age tale without cliche or sentimentality. Bolstered by a luminous lead performance from Lauren Ambrose.
  25. Smart, unpredictable, and alive with the energies of actors who clearly are enjoying being stretched by their material.
    • Boston Globe
    • 71 Metascore
    • 88 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    I have seen the future of Hollywood movie stardom, and its name is America Ferrera.
  26. More a bleak docu-melodrama than an esoteric morality play.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 88 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    Compston's performance and the downer milieu, presented with appropriate paint-peeling profanity, are more than enough to keep an audience riveted and ultimately moved close to tears.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 88 Critic Score
    Sensual, funny, and moving film.
  27. A tender genuflection to the women's energies that keep that spinning world from keeling over.
  28. It's lively, edgy, full of zigs and zags, juicy performances, and offbeat fun.
  29. If you thought ''Moulin Rouge,'' or, for that matter, ''Tommy,'' was trippy, Hedwig, with its glorious convergence of material and performer, will show you what you've been missing.
    • Boston Globe
  30. Like a whacked pinata, it spills over with treasures - and one of the best things to fall out is Steve Buscemi, doing a riotously meek variation on the mad-scientist-with-cracked-lenses-and-lab-coat bit.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 88 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    Nothing if not a celebration of our willingness to be gulled by life's charming strangers.
  31. It's slick, sleek, and stylish, and if it doesn't quite redefine cool, it certainly offers a snazzy update.
    • Boston Globe
  32. Sad, funny, brilliant.
    • Boston Globe
  33. The movie is the product of his (Friedman) big, shiny love of forgotten soul legends whom superstardom (and the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame, I might add) has eluded.
  34. Incisive, highly entertaining political farce.
  35. A lively, invigorating comedy: a near-perfect mix of fresh characters, well-cast voices, superb visuals, and a fast-paced, fantasy-adventure plot.
    • Boston Globe
  36. The film is conducted in a delirious cinema-verite style; most of what you see has a brutal, you-are-there immediacy. You're not merely watching history, you're engulfed by it.
  37. The cinematic equivalent of a high, arching rainbow of a three-pointer from midcourt.
  38. A slick, twisty, top-of-the-line crime thriller with gorgeously sensual textures and a screenful of wickedly faceted performances.
  39. It's the best drug-busting movie since ''The French Connection.''
  40. One of the most compelling films the Holocaust has yet produced.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 88 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    A rambunctious joy.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 88 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    The key to why the new ''American'' is so good and so true, though, is Brendan Fraser as the title character.
  41. An inventive, propulsive office thriller.
  42. What Christlieb and Kijak do so well is keeping these folks from not seeming like loons.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 88 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    The movie's strength is its refusal to offer easy answers.
  43. The film makes more apparent than ever that Howard is quite underrated as a filmmaker, possibly because he's been hidden in full view in the mainstream for so long.
    • Boston Globe
  44. As full of joy as pain, it's a perspective we need to see more often.
  45. Superior and original filmmaking. You won't be able to take your eyes off it.
    • Boston Globe
  46. The film's bountiful warmth and gusto do their work. By the end, we feel part of the family, too.
  47. Serendipity returns us, if only for a couple of hours, to the Manhattan of our dreams.
    • Boston Globe
    • 78 Metascore
    • 88 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    It's a honey of a performance: controlled, achingly human, and funny in the deepest ways.
  48. It's a treat to encounter the deadpan light-handedness with which Mamet goes about his business.
  49. It's deeply stylized, but there's an accompanying patience and gravity that are hard to shake. They're the architecture of a lingering, unsentimental sadness.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 88 Critic Score
    Elaborately layered movie about schemes and more schemes that pile up faster than chips on a blackjack table. The other half is realizing, about halfway through the film, that you won't figure it out until it's over.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 88 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    Scorsese and his team of Grade A talents are working on an operatic scale here, and like many operas, this is long, overwrought, sprawling, and more than frequently brilliant. It also hits just enough discordant notes to keep it from greatness.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 88 Critic Score
    A quirky, welcome addition to Disney's cavalcade of animated stars.
  50. Whatever portion of the alienated teen angst championship Thora Birch left unclaimed after ''American Beauty,'' she nails down brilliantly in Ghost World.
    • Boston Globe
  51. Fresh, original, and arresting.
    • Boston Globe
  52. As goofy action comedies go, Shaolin Soccer is one of the best.
  53. Bernal, with his sweet man-boy looks, makes Padre Amaro's portrait of corruption all the more flabbergasting in its irony.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 88 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    It's Cronenberg's finest film, it's star Ralph Fiennes's riskiest role, it's a tour de force for actress Miranda Richardson.
    • 90 Metascore
    • 88 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    Pixar is so good at what it does that every other kiddie-entertainment purveyor -- including parent company Disney -- flounders in comparison.
  54. The most disorienting and trippiest data-retrieval caper in years.
    • Boston Globe
    • 55 Metascore
    • 88 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    A comedy, and for all its cliches and clumsiness, close to a great one.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 88 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    A tremendous human drama, with each stage of its characters' journey a white-knuckle thriller in miniature.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 88 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    Utterly adorable.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 88 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    It's spookily touching to see this massed group of former rock gods gathered to honor one of their fallen. Bald spots and graying shags predominate; the giant velvet lapels of 1969 have given way to sensible sport coats; the granny glasses are for real.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 88 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    What's most unusual about the original 24 years later, though, is its elegant minimalism.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 88 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    The opening 15 minutes of Master and Commander: The Far Side of the World are so well crafted that they restore your faith in commercial cinema.
  55. Nathaniel fares well with his father's fellow masters, although Frank Gehry seems evasive.
  56. AKA
    The triptych is a device but never a gimmick: three windows into one fractured soul.
    • 94 Metascore
    • 88 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    Yet what I felt when the lights came up at the end of this visionary, titanic, relentless experience was something different: a strange relief that it was, at last, over.
  57. The film's central drama is not between the former secretary and the filmmaker. It's between McNamara and history.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 88 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    Three quarters of Cold Mountain consist of some of the most masterful and absorbing filmmaking of the year. The final quarter is Hollywood business as usual.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 88 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    Osama works simply as the story of one unlucky young girl.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 88 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    As sagas of endurance in the face of ridiculous odds go, this story is up there with Shackleton and ''Into Thin Air.''
  58. As casually insensitive and careless as you might expect from a film of this era, but it's also surprisingly crafty about finding ways to incite discussion
    • 73 Metascore
    • 88 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    A straight-up drama and thus the only film in "The Trilogy" not forced into a genre straitjacket -- suspense thriller ("On the Run") or farce ("An Amazing Couple") -- "Life" is also the finest of the three. This isn't a coincidence.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 88 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    Filmed with a cold, poetic beauty, The Return slowly strips away motivation until it arrives at a place of myth both private and oddly universal.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 88 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    One of the most enjoyable movies I've seen lately, but it has a biting knowledge of that which history gives and history takes away.
  59. Eloquent and unapologetically cute.
  60. Despite its ultimate nuttiness, has a quiet, consuming power that sneaks up on you and doesn't go away. This is something new and ambitious for Von Trier: a work of compassion.

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