Boston Globe's Scores

For 5,403 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 55% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 43% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 0.7 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Movie review score: 62
Highest review score: 100 Polisse
Lowest review score: 0 P2
Score distribution:
5,403 movie reviews
    • 67 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    The stakes in this story seem too low to justify its audience’s attention. If The Page Turner were a novel, it would hardly be a page turner. Why should we hold films to a lower standard?
    • 39 Metascore
    • 50 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    It's off-putting, rude, misshapen, and more often than not hysterically funny. The second half, sadly, is an ear-splitting train wreck.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 50 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    Stitched together from so many other movies that it plays like an attack of multiple déjà vu. Stray bits of “Star Wars,’’ “Pirates of the Caribbean,’’ “Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon,’’ and “Robin Hood’’ pass by like flotsam, and the overwhelming tone is good-natured but alarmingly generic.
  1. Conspicuously short on the kind of texture that makes us feel we're watching real people living real lives.
  2. The F&F series is the 21st century's beach movie, one for some beachless future world where the kids are crowning 25 and seem capable of living off of hair gel and exhaust fumes.
  3. Oh my God, evil. What's with you? Ever since "The Exorcist," it's been the same song-and-crab-dance: Demons don't kill, divorce does.
  4. Strauch’s orotund prose sounds much like that of Werner Herzog, but without the irony. Herzog’s sensibility is missed here; he could have made a masterpiece about the absurdity of these deluded seekers of Eden.
  5. More machine than mean, although it's anything but a smoothly running operation.
    • Boston Globe
    • 48 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    Not the knee-slapper it wants to be, but it's endearing nonetheless.
  6. It's taken Dreamgirls 25 years and several false starts to get to the screen, so it's a shame to see what a rush job it feels like.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 50 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    It's a doughty movie, stuck halfway between Masterpiece Theatre and Classics Illustrated, but, to his credit, gifted journeyman director Michael Apted understands he's playing the long game.
  7. This is a movie about excess. It's excessively long (at least it feels that way), the slo-mo is used in excess (so are the swords), and our heroine, Yuki (Yumiko Shaku), when she does emote, is excessively weepy for a coldblooded assassin.
  8. The imagery is lush, but the story is pretty cornball, with an ending that can only be called pure Hollywood. Only the marvelous Cate Blanchett transcends stereotype.
    • Boston Globe
  9. There is, however, Viola Davis, who might win an Oscar tomorrow for her one scene in "Doubt." Her part here - a minister combing the street for crack-whores to rescue - is about three times as large.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 50 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    If Ten9Eight brings NFTE to the attention of you, your child, or your school administrator, that’s probably all that matters.
  10. A climactic explosion is too obviously a rigged gunpowder charge, and it becomes a metaphor for the film's mistake of diminishing the frantic motion that kept things fizzy and fun.
    • Boston Globe
    • 51 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    Zizek is a revolutionary playing a comedian playing a revolutionary. Which makes him worth watching, even in this movie.
  11. An inconsequential high-school-reunion comedy that gets better when it stops trying to make you laugh.
  12. If most boxing movies are about redemption, Resurrecting the Champ is a boxing movie that goes to exasperating lengths to redeem its boxing writer.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 50 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    The hair is funny, in part, because not much else is. “Burt Wonderstone” is a lazy, underwritten imitation Will Ferrell movie.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 50 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    It's predictable fluff, sometimes pleasantly so, at others times irritatingly.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 50 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    You’ve seen pieces of this movie in “Psycho,” “Silence of the Lambs,” and 2004’s “Cellular.” Still, the early scenes in the Hive give The Call a needed novelty: It’s a workplace drama, and the work is responding to other people’s desperate worst-case scenarios.
  13. In its zeal to counter the negativity usually found in depictions of Mormons, God's Army eventually succumbs to overearnestness, sentimentality, and cliche.
    • Boston Globe
  14. The B-movie is still very much with us.
  15. Give credit to writer-director James DeMonaco for at least attempting to give his action thriller some heft with a plot that concerns our obsession with violence, ham-fisted as it is. But The Purge: Anarchy is still just an excuse to bombard us with high-powered weaponry, armored vehicles, vigilantes, and masked marauders in creepy Joker-like makeup.
  16. It’s a self-reflexive tour de force, laugh-out-loud in its outrageousness, a true gift from the Movie God, who, if not Tarantino, is in this case probably Sam Peckinpah. You just have to endure 90 minutes of inanity to get to enjoy it.
  17. The movie is weak on attempts at survivalist philosophy (anyone bit by a zombie is likely to become one). Even the religious overtones feel tinny and unpronounced.
  18. Walking Tall, which is credited to four different writers, is wanting for a reason to be.
  19. In Sandler's movies, men don't cry; they urinate. So the scene in which the stars empty their bladders and change the color of a swimming pool's water might be the weepiest of the year.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 50 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    Explicit yet consistently unerotic. It's also intensely sad, capturing everything about these people except the high they ceaselessly chase.

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