Boston Globe's Scores

For 5,368 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 55% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 43% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 0.8 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Movie review score: 62
Highest review score: 100 Moolaadé
Lowest review score: 0 Porky's
Score distribution:
5,368 movie reviews
  1. The one-sidedness of Farmageddon isn't just an artistic failing. It's an argumentative failing, too.
    • 40 Metascore
    • 38 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    Del Toro does remind you of Brando here; unfortunately, it's the Brando of ''Apocalypse Now,'' the one with the green face and puffy line readings. Jones fares better, even if he wears the same grieving-for-humanity expression throughout the film.
    • 34 Metascore
    • 38 Critic Score
    A veritable rip-off of 1995's "The Usual Suspects," Beach's crime caper not-so-subtly apes Bryan Singer's use of multiple red herrings and flashback-heavy interrogation scenes, but lacks the stylistic flair and sophisticated narrative skills to pull off a similar feat of cinematic intrigue.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 38 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    Works hard to give quirk a bad name.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 38 Critic Score
    It was possible to hope that Blade II would turn out to be good. Well, forget it.
  2. Nothing works. Or some of it works, but that doesn't matter because what's working is so deeply, painfully boring.
  3. Audiences are going to want to brace themselves, too – for a movie that refuses to recognize when it’s going too far, with its wince-eliciting jokes about jailhouse rape in particular.
  4. It's not boring to watch, but in the end it's too lame and too tame. [21 Apr 1995]
    • Boston Globe
    • 30 Metascore
    • 38 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    If most December movie releases are epic-length and Oscar-ambitious, then Punisher: War Zone has to be considered Hobbesian counterprogramming: It's nasty, brutish, and short.
    • 39 Metascore
    • 38 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    Young children and adults with high pain thresholds will enjoy the movie during its brief pause on the way to your On Demand menu.
    • 36 Metascore
    • 38 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    It must have looked great on paper. On screen, it’s a soapy mess that even Joan Crawford in her delusional late-period prime couldn’t save.
  5. Some bad movies can make you feel awful for the people who made them and worse for the audience that shows up. The actors, the script, the camera: There's nowhere good they can go. For Greater Glory is that kind of bad movie: a total embarrassment.
  6. Unlike most of what Moore has been in, Dedication is unlikely to delight retirement homes on movie night. But it's not imaginative, lively, or true enough to speak to its intended audience of American Apparel shoppers, either. It's a slog.
  7. The most popular facial expression for victims in The Grudge 2 is something I'd like to call "deep befuddlement." This time "deep befuddlement" goes double for paying customers.
    • 39 Metascore
    • 38 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    Watching Arthur and the Invisibles is like sticking your head in a Gallic pinball machine: It's hectic, technically impressive, and your skull starts to pound after a while.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 38 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    A torpidly precious love story about death-obsessed adolescents, the film's becalmed and embalmed in its own sensitive self-pity.
  8. The Hollywood version of one of those fawning "60 Minutes" segments about musical prodigies. For most of it, I could hear the congested awe of Morley Safer.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 38 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    A peppy, fast-moving, wafer-thin amusement that's fine for kids if you don't mind a lot of Three Stooges-style martial arts. For grown-ups, it's the equivalent of a 59-cent tin globe.
  9. Isn't going to be a contender
  10. It plays better as exasperating comedy than genuine horror -- although there is something terrifying about being stuck in a movie whose idea of a bogeyman is a scarecrow with an eating disorder.
  11. If Bunraku were serious about subverting or reinventing the genres it's cobbled together, Moore would play the gunslinger or the samurai or the crime boss. But no. All she gets are a couple of scenes that demonstrate that she still looks great soaking wet.
  12. The young cast comes through with appealing, naturalistic performances. But Weber’s programmatic, preachy story and emotional manipulation is so blatant that it verges on the fatuous.
  13. Avalanches are nothing compared to the deadening touch of the stereotyping and audience-insulting simplicities in the scenic but brain-dead Vertical Limit.
    • 34 Metascore
    • 38 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    Noisy, silly, gratingly upbeat, and piously sentimental, 'Cheaper by the Dozen 2 is what passes for wholesome family entertainment these days. It's the sort of movie to send small children and grandparents out of the theater hugging each other and strong men in search of bourbon.
  14. Perhaps Employee of the Month, which was typed then directed by Greg Coolidge, is unfolding in the key of satire. But you'd have to be a dog to hear it.
  15. Human trafficking is an awful societal issue, and Trade happens to be an awful movie about human trafficking.
  16. It's a lame and painfully overextended satire of homophobia.
    • Boston Globe
  17. Funny about retribution, though - it's a tricky thing to make time for when you've still got mutant zombie hordes after you. The real premise turns out to be a busy rehash of the first movie's story line.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 38 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    The top-secret message this pigeon is carrying reads ''Wait for the DVD."
  18. What the Hughes brothers have come up with is, to borrow another phrase from that bygone age, a penny dreadful.
    • Boston Globe

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