Boston Globe's Scores

For 5,215 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 55% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 43% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 0.6 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Movie review score: 62
Highest review score: 100 Polisse
Lowest review score: 0 P2
Score distribution:
5,215 movie reviews
  1. Riveting tale of family dynamics packed with as much drama, conflict, and poignancy as the best feature film.
    • Boston Globe
  2. What an amazing presence Gorintin has. Never mind her hunched back and white hair, she's no crone. She makes Eka needy for happiness but susceptible to heartbreak. It's a great performance, full of both joy and the quiet, disappointing parts of being alive that come with knowing change is part of life.
  3. The movie observes the general misery of needing serious medical treatment and the particular awfulness of needing medical treatment you can't pay for.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 100 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    With at least nine primary characters and running two and a half hours, it's a big, fat novel of a movie - a domestic epic that fuses bitterness and forgiveness in completely satisfying ways.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 88 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    Maddin's Winnipeg is a rich, funky, funny stew of fears and desires, of mangled civic chronology mashed up with hothouse private emotions. This is a secret history, and it's a wonder.
  4. This is an extraordinary artistic breakthrough from a Mexican director who was already fearlessly good to begin with.
  5. Revanche was a foreign-language Oscar nominee this year, and it's a better movie than most of the films in the main race. The word "revanche" means "revenge" in German, but "waiting" would have been just as good.
  6. Moonrise Kingdom is Anderson's seventh movie, and it's the first since "Rushmore" that works from the opening shot to the final image.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 100 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    In his masterful and haunting documentary Up the Yangtze, Yung Chang shows the old China drowning helplessly under the weight of the new.
  7. Never settling for mere irony, High Hopes becomes a small banner of sanity and good humor among the social ruins. Leigh never shies away from his unflinching dead-end class view of contemporary London. Nor does he wallow in '60s nostalgia. Which is part of the reason his passionate, life-embracing High Hopes is so exhilarating. [31 Mar. 1989, p.30]
    • Boston Globe
  8. Haunting, powerfully acted, penetratingly written, it's about people coming home -- and not coming home -- to their marriages.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 88 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    What Moreau does with this role is as inscrutably moving as anything Séraphine Louis painted.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 100 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    No matter their wealth or social status, these people share disappointments and elations and a sense that life, in the end, may be what life is about.
  9. Naked is one of the most scorchingly compelling films in years, Mike Leigh's masterpiece, an unflinching vision of civilization in retreat, life as apocalypse. [4 Mar. 1994, p.51]
    • Boston Globe
    • 84 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    Broadcast News grows in your memory. It recalls an era when movies were made by, for and with three-dimensional characters you cared about. Let's hope it doesn't take James L. Brooks another four years to make another one. We can't wait that long. [25 Dec 1987, p.53]
    • Boston Globe
  10. By nearly every measure, Milk is a beautifully made, far less conventional movie biography than most.
  11. This is a love letter from one auteur to another that doesn't feel like a term paper. Instead, Far From Heaven is an honest-to-God drama with resonance all its own.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 88 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    War Witch deals with a reality so horrific that the film’s touches of magical realism are welcome, even necessary — the only way to retain one’s bearings and sanity in a world without signposts.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 100 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    The surface of Oslo, August 31st is as cool and crystalline as a Scandinavian lake, but at its core is a benevolence for the life we all share and tears for the man who can no longer share in it.
  12. A watchful, winding-down tragedy of a movie that delivers what it promises. As commentary, it's grim. As filmmaking, it's a powerfully disturbing odyssey through the Bucharest health care system.
  13. The film is a tower of literary and cinematic references, tangential yet somehow essential characters, and one fantastic performance after another. It's a simple movie yet is anything but.
  14. Kurt and Mark's trip to those hot springs is a figurative return to Eden. Anyone who's had a disillusioning reunion with a moony old friend knows what Mark discovers: They're too old to stay that innocent. None of this hit me until after the movie ended. But it hit me hard: You can't go home again.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 88 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    Deeper, darker currents move through Momma's Man, eddying around fears of letting go on both sides of the generational divide.
  15. This is the most significant feature about poor black life since Charles Burnett's 1977 "Killer of Sheep."
  16. Volver brims with personal and cinematic allusions, but no one hungry for a well-told tale from a master storyteller is required to understand them.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 88 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    An electrifying, at times heartbreaking documentary from the Egyptian-born, Harvard-educated documentarian Jehane Noujaim (“Control Room”).
    • 84 Metascore
    • 88 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    I can't think of another movie this year that made me laugh or weep harder for the whole lumpy business of being - the compromises and connections that get us through the day and somehow add up to entire lives.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 100 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    Compact, nasty, and altogether wonderful, a tale of brotherly greed and New York comeuppance that shows an old dog dusting off old tricks using new technology.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 88 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    Happy-Go-Lucky isn't one of Leigh's epic social canvases like "Secrets & Lies" or even "Topsy-Turvy"; rather, it's an edgy character study whose message only gradually emerges.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 88 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    On the level of a popcorn thrill ride, Snowpiercer is a beaut.

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