Boston Globe's Scores

For 1,586 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 66% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 31% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 0.2 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Music review score: 71
Highest review score: 100 City of Refuge
Lowest review score: 10 Lulu
Score distribution:
  1. Negative: 9 out of 1586
1,586 music reviews
    • 67 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The former "Moesha" star has never made a bad album, and she's not starting now with the appropriately rich and varied Human.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    If sonic similitude is any indicator of future successes, When the World Comes Down will only cement the band's top-of-the-heap status.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    One thing we do know after listening to Leucocyte--the Esbjorn Svensson Trio's grandest achievement--is that its leader had much more to say, much more to explore.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    His singing throughout is flawless and expressive.
    • 89 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Some of the phrasing on "MPP" sticks; some of it soars; most of it slips and slides through puddles of rich sonic texture. Only at a distance does the magic of the whole major-key mess become clear.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Bringing in an unknown vocalist, Minneapolis alt-rocker Wendy Lewis, may sound like a risk, but it works exceedingly well.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    On his third and finest CD in 16 short months, the Florida-based MC has emerged as one of hip-hop's best by dropping unvarnished, aggressive songs with unsparing detail.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    This deeply introspective album is vast in scope while retaining the intimacy of a concert-hall recital.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    This album is his best yet with his own band, a potent dose of rock and R&B instead of the lighter jazz and world music of past efforts.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The man's wordsmithing is even headier than his beautiful songs.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Ray Guns Are Not Just the Future is not an enormous departure from their self-titled debut; after all, why mess with a good thing?
    • 70 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    For all its immediately recognizable debts, "Dance Mother" is something fresh.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    OST
    The three raw but riveting demos that conclude the album illustrate how close to fully formed Biggie's style was even as a teen.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    It's refreshing how single-minded some of the new songs are, especially when coupled with Allen's lyrical zingers.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    On his fourth album, the Arizona-born artist continues to impress on one well-written song after another.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Zapotec has a regal, brassy sort of sweep--check the martial melody 'The Akara'--and the best songs on Holland twist and turn over a warm, buttery backbeat.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The indie troubadour spins out his trademark blend of vintage country-folk that begs to be played on an old turntable and heard through the screen door. Fortunately, great music transcends its medium.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Years of Refusal is Morrissey's third album this decade, and it is easily his most vital and engaging and maybe even heartbreaking since 1992's "Your Arsenal."
    • 68 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    After releasing two albums that bored even its most ardent fans, . . . And You Will Know Us by the Trail of Dead is back to blowing minds with The Century of Self.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Troubadour, the Somali-born artist's follow-up to his great debut, is a smart fusion of influences.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Grimy and disheveled, clever and infectious, it's a sloppy heap of classic pop, psychedelic haze, spastic rock, and teenage disaffection mixed to lo-fi imperfection in some kid's filthy garage.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    All of these songs could stand alone on separate albums; it just so happens that this good music supports a good cause.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Wrath furthers Lamb of God's reputation for craft and innovation and argues to a broader audience that metal is a style rife with fresh ideas.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Roll On finds Cale back in vintage form.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Middle Cyclone is by far Case's most quixotic album, and that's saying a lot considering the abstract ideas behind her last studio album, 2006's "Fox Confessor Brings the Flood." Yet it's also the most revealing and rewarding work in a 12-year recording career that has seen Case evolve from an alt-country siren to a singular songwriter as capricious as a weather vane.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    This is a more basic, stripped-down affair, yet Copeland's vocals are no less powerful. Boy, has she got a set of lungs.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    He continues to deliver the goods on Lucky by singing about the unlucky.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    No matter the stage of the romance, it's always DEFCON 1 in Clarkson-ville. And on All I Ever Wanted, out Tuesday, that melodrama translates into a delightfully incongruous good time.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The striking thing about Justin Townes Earle's new record is the variety of styles it visits in just over 30 minutes. Just as striking, this variety doesn't come across as dabbling or disparity.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Bare Bones is a beautifully slow-cooked album that encourages us to look on the bright side. Not a bad message these days.