Boston Globe's Scores

For 1,295 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 47% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 50% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 5.2 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average TV Show review score: 60
Highest review score: 100 Game of Thrones: Season 3
Lowest review score: 0 Sons Of Hollywood: Season 1
Score distribution:
  1. Mixed: 0 out of 655
  2. Negative: 0 out of 655
655 tv reviews
  1. Given the welcome arrival of spring, some viewers may not be ready to dive into the wintry expanses of Fargo, but, based on the first few episodes, it will be worth reliving the chill.
  2. A strange, fascinating, and sometimes brilliant contemporary take on the father of forensic crime-solving.
  3. The return of You’re the Worst is a welcome event, a great way to fill in some of the TV dead zone between now and the mid-September rush.
  4. Unlike the majority of today's youth-market vehicles, Undeclared has been put together with a refreshing lack of cynicism (as well as a refreshing lack of laugh track). [25 Sept 2001, p.E1]
    • Boston Globe
  5. At points, the new episodes strain to link past and present, with Thackery launching into didacticism about how addiction needs to be viewed as an illness, and not a moral failing. His argument seems a bit too forward-thinking, and it threatens the show’s hard-earned period authenticity. But generally, the writing pulls in still-festering themes effortlessly, blending them with plotlines that are never less than engaging.
  6. Everything else about A Poet in New York, which is timed to air alongside the centennial of Thomas’s birth, is small and underwhelming. That sounds like a damning complaint, but the limits of the script, by Andrew Davies, actually benefit Hollander’s performance to some extent.
  7. Nashville falls somewhere in between the two extremes, a story that thrives on heightened melodrama and big twists but gives its characters more depth than you generally find in network lather-fests.
  8. Starz’s The Missing is a reminder that familiar material can indeed yield extremely absorbing drama, that often the excellence of a series comes from the crispness of the script, the intelligence of the directing, and the intensity of the acting, and not necessarily the newness of the concept.
  9. Now, in the weeks after their deaths, which came a day apart in late December, “Bright Lights” is something more than an intimate study in two very different approaches to fame; it’s also a lovely elegy.
  10. Rarely do they strain the credulity of real situations or the constraints of the time.
  11. The story of the plague has been told before, and it will and should continue to find new life. But The Normal Heart tells it with admirable honesty and plenty of emotion.
  12. The acting is extraordinary.
  13. It’s a promising reentry. All the major themes, so subtly articulated across the first six seasons, are coming to a head.
  14. The high and witty style of Ian Richardson and the production team headed by Ken Riddington will have you coming back for more, even though there's really much less going on here than meets the eye. [20 Mar 1991]
    • Boston Globe
  15. This season as much as last, In Treatment brings us into more intimacy with its characters than almost any other series on TV.
  16. Given how sharp his songwriting is, it’s little surprise that Sondheim makes an excellent storyteller, always candid and precise, and by turns funny and rueful. And it’s a remarkable tale, one that could probably make for a great musical.
  17. American Crime is indeed filled with some impressive material, if you can get past the pretensions.... Both Hutton and Huffman act up a storm.
  18. For those who have read Wright’s book, there isn’t much new here, but Gibney skillfully weaves the stories and visuals, particularly an extended passage about Cruise, into an engrossing narrative.... By focusing on the powerful and damning stories of the church’s most destructive practices, including the forced “disconnection” of members from family and friends, Gibney has made a forceful and memorable case.
  19. She was one of the best and brightest correspondents on “The Daily Show,” and she puts that same sharp, clever, unflinching sensibility front and center on Full Frontal. It helps that she is backed by dexterous writers who slip in a lot of wily asides.
  20. The Killing quickly hooks you with its steadily unfolding story line. Created by Veena Sud, based on a Danish TV hit named "Forbrydelsen," the show draws you into the tragedy of the crime, and then makes you crave its solution.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    While the performances are first-rate, "EZ Streets" is a tad too in love with itself, and at least for the first two hours, it never shakes free of its pretentiousness. [26 Oct 1996]
    • Boston Globe
  21. With none of the conventional plot techniques TV viewers are accustomed to, it is a collection of rich moments and poignant characters that loosely adds up to something quite powerful.
  22. For a new series, Sports Night already has a nicely developed sense of ensemble and texture. Charles and Krause show a natural chemistry as anchors and friends, and Robert Guillaume has strong presence as the imposing executive producer. The most appealing actor, though, is Huffman, who is dynamic as the committed producer who lives only for airtime. She's got caffeine running through her veins. [22 Sept 1998, p.C1]
    • Boston Globe
  23. The Dresser is a British prestige blowout. It’s rich in commanding, frightening, and sad performances, all of which are in service of a beautifully layered script that takes on aging, missed opportunity, and dire regret.
  24. Breaking Bad works as an unabashedly bold story about a man in extremis, told with the iconographic and ironic sensibility of Quentin Tarantino.
  25. In the first four new episodes, her characters remain in their self-contained cultural warp, still only just beginning to mingle with hipsters and hard drugs and cold, careering artists, and, yes, black people.
  26. Like “Louie,” “Atlanta,” and “Better Things,” the show operates more as a slice of life than as a plotted story. It’s an extraordinary portrait of an ordinary, relatable, and delightful person.
  27. Tonight's premiere isn't one of the series' most cleverly wrought scripts; it's more of a welcome-back party than a gem.
  28. It is a treat, if not a revelation, for fans. This is very well plowed ground, after all. As for the as yet uninitiated, what they don’t find baffling they’ll likely find excessive.
  29. Created by Mike Judge, it does for techies, venture capitalists, and tech-biz campuses what Judge’s film “Office Space” did for cubicle dwellers, their bosses, and office parks back in 1999.

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