Boston Globe's Scores

For 6,315 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 55% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 42% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 0.1 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Movie review score: 63
Highest review score: 100 The Kids Are All Right
Lowest review score: 0 The Nutcracker
Score distribution:
6315 movie reviews
    • 81 Metascore
    • 88 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    Arrival would be nothing without Adams.
  1. The coming of age is not just that of character but of a whole nation, and despite the mild-seeming moniker, the Jasmine Revolution earned its victories the hard way.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 75 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    If Gimme Danger never quite solves the secret of Iggy’s onstage atavism — how he pushed the myth of sheer, unhinged rock ’n’ roll abandon until he embodied it better (or worse) than anyone else, ever — it reminds us of when he was, verily, the velociraptor of popular music.
    • 99 Metascore
    • 100 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    In its quietly radical grace, it’s a cultural watershed — a work that dismantles all the ways our media view young black men and puts in their place a series of intimate truths. You walk out feeling dazed, more whole, a little cleaner.
  2. A Cinderella subplot involving the prince’s scullery maid (Zooey Deschanel) is similarly both familiar and tonally refreshing, from the whimsical vocals to the disco skate that subs for a glass slipper.
  3. The upshot: The movie develops a distinctively trippy identity.
  4. It is epic in scope, intimate in detail, and otherworldly in its dimensions, like the Bayeux Tapestry with special effects and a stentorian soundtrack.
  5. Ironically, the phoniness that iconic teen romantic Holden Caulfield despised pervades Jim Sadwith’s Coming through the Rye, a semi-autobiographical tale of hero worship and literary integrity.
  6. The performances are meticulous and passionate, the narrative low-key and obliquely sensitive enough to conceal, until the traumatic incidents keep piling up, the film’s contrivance.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 100 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    Elegantly depraved and immaculately degenerate, Park Chan Wook’s The Handmaiden is an astonishment. The filmmaking is masterful, very near to Hitchcock in its sly, controlled teasing of the audience.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 38 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    A new movie based on Roth’s 1997 novel “American Pastoral” offers proof yet again that this writer’s great literary gifts are almost impossible to translate to the screen. Roth is a protean American inner voice. The movies, sad to say, remain better at exteriors.
    • 42 Metascore
    • 63 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    Inferno is the exact cinematic equivalent of an airport paperback, which is what’s fine and forgettable about it.
  7. Campos really doesn’t need to tack on such heavy-handed irony as the scene near the end of a disconsolate woman eating ice cream and singing along with the theme song of “The Mary Tyler Moore Show.”
    • 88 Metascore
    • 88 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    Braga has hardly stopped working since, on either continent, but Aquarius is a comeback, a homecoming, and a character film in which both the heroine and the actress playing her are characters of the first order.
  8. The best moments come in seeing Galifianakis’s costars try to keep up with him as he finally, frantically lets loose.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 88 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    Is Kelly Reichardt the most under-acknowledged great director working in America right now? Her new movie, Certain Women, is one of the glories of this or any other year, but it stays true to Reichardt form, which is to say it’s low-key, allusive, lit up with implied meanings without ever leading us by the hand.
  9. It all makes for competent but routine suspense.
  10. Lassgård won’t let you off easy: A scene in which Ove weeps hopelessly before the magnitude of his loneliness will bring tears to the eyes of anyone who has suffered a loss. His Ove is a man indeed.
  11. Contrived, inane, absurd, and occasionally brilliant, it’s all a blur.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 63 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    The Accountant keeps you hanging on all the way to the looney-toon ending, well past the point where your higher brain functions have called it a night. It’s not a good movie but it’s not a bad way to kill a few hours.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 75 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    Ironically, the film itself is as gentle and unexploitative as they come. Yes, it deserves the rating, and yes, it depicts teenagers doing things the grown-ups would rather not admit they actually do, but it does so with a poetic curiosity and a sense of what it’s like to be young, poor, and rootless — both future-less and free.
  12. The film works adequately as a historical drama.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 63 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    If only the movie had the courage to be as gonzo as it wants to be!
    • 69 Metascore
    • 63 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    Produced, co-written, and directed by its star, The Birth of a Nation is very much a first film, its hesitancies disguised as bluntness, and the best things about it are Parker’s acting and his ambitions.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 50 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    There’s a lot of talent here and a lot of enthusiasm; also a lot of influences that haven’t been successfully reprocessed into something convincing or fresh. It’s a mess, but a reasonably charming one.
  13. The film’s lone strength is the fleeting dramatic scenes offering a little back story — and pathos — on Rafe’s home life with his sweetly understanding single mom (Lauren Graham, who you’d guess wouldn’t have bothered otherwise).
  14. Kenner and Schlosser not only remind us of a danger that never went away, but honor the men whose bravery was never recognized.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 50 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    It’s weird-stupid more than good-stupid.
  15. The movie bogs down only toward the finish, when it turns into a metahuman free-for-all.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 63 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    A taut, engrossing action movie about real-life heroes, so why is it a disappointment? Because director Peter Berg is telling the wrong story.

Top Trailers