Boston Globe's Scores

For 5,735 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 55% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 43% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 0.6 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Movie review score: 63
Highest review score: 100 Polisse
Lowest review score: 0 The Devil Inside
Score distribution:
5735 movie reviews
    • 79 Metascore
    • 88 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    You never know where Mother is going to go next. All you know is that you're in the hands of a master with an appreciably bent sense of humor.
  1. The characters look as if they’d be more comfortable with intertitles than spoken dialogue. And the faces — Marion Cotillard as Ewa, the beleaguered Polish immigrant of the title, holds a close-up as well as Lillian Gish or Louise Brooks.
  2. Like another documentary set in North Dakota, Jesse Moss’s “The Overnighters,” they follow the story for months as it unfolds, offering no editorial guidance except dates and places and a soundtrack by T. Griffith that underscores the growing angst and pending horror. Welcome to Leith. Say goodbye to certitude.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 88 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    After 152 epic minutes, ‘Lake of Fire’ comes down to this: If you’re not living this woman’s life, maybe you shouldn’t tell her what to do.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 88 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    The result is Grade-A agitpop, a mixture of archival footage and cheeky, creative animated reconstruction that's funny and frightening in equal measure.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 88 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    Watching Gus Van Sant's Gerry is the cinematic equivalent of watching paint dry. I mean that as high praise.
  3. The cinematic equivalent of a high, arching rainbow of a three-pointer from midcourt.
  4. The miraculous thing about Let's Get Lost is that Weber has managed to create something that's both impossibly stylized and unmistakably moral (not judgmental, moral).
    • 73 Metascore
    • 88 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    Three quarters of Cold Mountain consist of some of the most masterful and absorbing filmmaking of the year. The final quarter is Hollywood business as usual.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 88 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    The film is as spare and unvarnished as a wooden temple floating on a lake, but its reflections run deep, and it can ripple your thoughts for months.
  5. Hurtling from the screen with a vigor and importance that are all but absent from contemporary film, it's a deeply moving social drama, raw and gritty in style, shining with moral purpose as it delivers a scathing take-it-into-the-streets critique of feral capitalism and racism. [18 July 1997, p.D1]
    • Boston Globe
  6. A movingly acted, terrifically old-fashioned World War II picture rethought as a post-colonial rebuke.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 88 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    Across the board, the performances testify, often hilariously, to the pain these characters feel and inflict but are incapable of expressing.
  7. The decadence is obvious. But true to the Valentino prerogative, it's beautiful - sad, too: a dream life moving into the unknown.
  8. At once riveting and heartbreaking. This youngest daughter of Robert F. Kennedy has the good sense — far rarer among documentarians than you’d like to think — not to get in the way of her material.
  9. Bug
    Engrossingly manic version of Tracy Letts's great stage play.
    • 90 Metascore
    • 88 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    Takahata and his animators balance aspects of nostalgia and the present day, urban modernity and rural timelessness, love and regret with a visual and aural sensitivity that draws a viewer in from the first frames.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 88 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    Wants to claim Bukowski (1920-1994) as a 20th-century West Coast Walt Whitman -- a people's poet of modern degradation. Through a selective presentation of his writing and a reverently crass treatment of his life, it makes a funny, often intensely moving case, and you're having such a good time that you're glad to let it.
  10. A witty yet fiery and, in the best sense, provocative play of ideas about freedom of expression.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 88 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    A movie called Snakes on a Plane had better be one of two things: So bad it's good or so good it's great. Darned if it isn't a little bit of both.
  11. Superior and original filmmaking. You won't be able to take your eyes off it.
    • Boston Globe
    • 67 Metascore
    • 88 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    A delightfully deadpan comedy from Germany, is one of those movies where nothing whatsoever seems to happen until you look closely, at which point everything happens.
    • 89 Metascore
    • 88 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    The Lives of Others has similarities to Francis Ford Coppola's 1974 classic "The Conversation" but with undercurrents that resound across an entire century of European political history.
  12. Signe Baumane opens her sardonically hilarious, sneakily moving, autobiographical animated feature, Rocks in My Pocket, with what looks like a darker version of one of those chipper psycho-pharmaceutical ads.
  13. Incisive, highly entertaining political farce.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 88 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    Jason Schwartzman is a fine actor, but he has a knack for creating characters you want to punch in the face, and Philip, who has a second novel coming out and is intent on burning all his bridges, is almost marvelously obnoxious.
  14. Has a power that doesn't announce itself until it's over: You leave not wanting to give up on life, just resentful of the world we live in.
  15. In this engaging, understated comedy, it is the journey and not the destination that matters.
    • Boston Globe
  16. Add to those John Curran’s adaptation of Robyn Davidson’s autobiographical book “Tracks.” In it he presents a vision of nature that shimmers with uncanny beauty and eerie solitude, transcended by Mia Wasikowska in one of the best performances of the year.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 88 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    Happy-Go-Lucky isn't one of Leigh's epic social canvases like "Secrets & Lies" or even "Topsy-Turvy"; rather, it's an edgy character study whose message only gradually emerges.

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