Boston Globe's Scores

For 5,842 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 55% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 43% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 0.6 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Movie review score: 63
Highest review score: 100 The Secret of the Grain
Lowest review score: 0 All About Steve
Score distribution:
5842 movie reviews
  1. Efficient, but in the end quite pedestrian.
    • Boston Globe
  2. It makes for a structurally glitchy inspirational exercise whose climax carries all the goosebump-making drama of a Pats preseason game.
  3. The film doesn't have enough innovation or pizazz to attract teenagers, and it lacks the novel charm that made ''Spy Kids'' a surprising winner with both adults and younger audiences.
  4. Returning director Wilson Yip commits to this tone too late, getting lost in tangential conflict and stunt casting — in this corner, Mike Tyson! — at the expense of the drama and even the action.
  5. Riggen has no shame when it comes to jerking the tears — surging music, cute children, suffering children — and sometimes her manipulations work even on the hardest of hearts.
    • 31 Metascore
    • 50 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    Goldsman takes Helprin’s book — a work overflowing with events, ideas, characters, passions — and pounds away at it until all that’s left is mush.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 50 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    The carnage is cartoonishly graphic, but the onlookers watching through binoculars from a nearby sandy bluff are impressed.
  6. Stabs at the dramatic don't amount to anything that makes us care, even for Bell, who has been solid on AMC's "The Walking Dead'' and in the chairlift chiller "Frozen.'' But genre fans who have been thirsting for gore via acupuncture needles or a LASIK machine should get their giddy fill.
  7. The movie is only sporadically interesting.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 50 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    Formulaic enough to suggest that franchise would be B level at best, a TV series at worst. But it's also just good enough to make you want to watch it, anyway.
  8. The best thing about the new film of H.G. Wells's The Time Machine is the machine.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    The heart of On Broadway is in the right place. But when the story behind a film is more interesting than what's on the screen, that's a problem.
  9. Gangster Squad is an almost movie. It's almost terrible. It's almost entertaining. But it's missing the shameless insanity of a wonderfully bad movie, and the particular vision, point of view, and coherence of some very good ones. So it sits there in between - loud, flashy, and unnecessary.
  10. In the end, it's much ado about not very much, certainly not enough to catapult Bass into a film career, but probably enough to satisfy 'N Sync fans.
    • Boston Globe
    • 69 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    A long crawl from inception to climax.
    • Boston Globe
    • 33 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    Entertaining in a B-movie sort of way, and you can't help admiring its earnestness about the philosophical issues it invokes.
  11. Martin is lots of friendly fun, proving once again that he is an actor with untapped range and style. Without him, the movie would deflate. [20 Dec 1991, p.54]
    • Boston Globe
    • 51 Metascore
    • 50 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    A pall of disaster, in fact, hangs over everyone in this shapeless, hankie-wringing adaptation of the best-selling Jodi Picoult novel.
  12. What makes the film such a guilty pleasure is how Williams's righteous self-pity is perfectly matched to Collette's nuttiness and despair.
  13. Only in the epilogue does the film mention that none of the miners was compensated and no one was held responsible.
  14. The film is content to remain at the level of the mildly entertaining, with no real surprises and not much sass. [04 Dec 1992]
    • Boston Globe
    • 64 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    Murder should either be unsparingly real or kitschy like the ''Texas Chainsaw Massacre.'' This is neither.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 50 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    Watching Prometheus is like opening a deluxe gift box from Tiffany's to find a mug from the dollar store.
  15. Based on her short film, Candler’s Hellion pads its slender, commonplace, but potentially rewarding premise with contrivances, clichés, repetitiousness, and, when all else fails, implausible, arbitrary melodrama.
  16. For all Kendrick's stolidity, he delivers a couple of wrenchingly tender scenes.
  17. Angelo Pizzo knows inspirational sports drama. As the writer of “Hoosiers” and “Rudy,” Pizzo has made a career out of mining the genre and its themes of underdog determination and locker-room brotherhood. But he’s overmatched in his directing debut, the well-intentioned football biopic My All American.
  18. Last Days aspires to the kind of no-frills, psychological terror of Duncan Jones’s brilliant “Moon” (2009) but, despite some determined performances, settles for the clichés of the abortive “Apollo 18” (2011).
    • 49 Metascore
    • 50 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    The result is a state-of-the-art multiplex three-ring circus whose special effects stagger the senses and play like a video game, whose human drama aims for the cosmic and lands waist-deep in the Big Silly.
  19. The camera, costumes, and art direction do everything right. Too much so. The movie strips away both the grand weirdness of the circus and the dire desolation of the Depression. Diane Arbus and Dorothea Lange are exchanged for Vanity Fair.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 50 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    A Good Woman is pretty to look at and fakes witty elegance passably, so consider it a diversion -- a movie that might have been in the Oscar race if the elements had jelled but has instead been properly hung out to dry in February.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 50 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    It's ''Hannah and Her Sisters'' with all the emotions and half the artistry.
  20. The fundamental problem with this Macbeth is that it insists on reducing the mystery of motivation to the pop psychology of a magazine article.
  21. Ramona and Beezus the movie, should not be confused with "Beezus and Ramona'' the book.
  22. Unfortunately for Tatum and Seyfried, Ryan Gosling and Rachel McAdams did a far more convincing version of this same basic dance in “The Notebook.’’
    • 66 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    Much like reality TV, nothing much of consequence happens.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    The movie feels padded. And Hopkins's deft touch as a writer and director leaves him when it comes to casting.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 50 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    Hot gospel singing and earnest family squabbles are all that distinguish Joyful Noise.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 50 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    I'm still not convinced we needed a new Spider-Man series, but at least this installment is interestingly mediocre instead of actively bad.
  23. Funny thing, though: The sunnier that Barrymore gets in her scenes with Sandler, the more the iffy elements and leaden bits seem to just melt away.
  24. The actors also acquit themselves well singing the film's numerous tunes. Breslin's voice is pleasantly melodic, while Nivola sounds like someone who's been grinding it out on tour for years.
  25. The movie is long and uniquely bad, the last of Stephenie Meyer's four books greedily tortured into two installments.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 50 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    Story lines don't come any clammier.
  26. It's too psychically flat and dramatically inert. Instead of reinvigorating a Hollywood classic, Burton only takes it to camp.
    • Boston Globe
    • 72 Metascore
    • 50 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    ParaNorman is supposedly for kids, but it's really aimed at their snarky older brothers, and it illustrates the limits of the new family creepshows.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 50 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    Watching Melancholia is like being stuck next to a brilliant depressive at a dinner party. The food is exquisite, the conversation scintillating, and the longer you sit there the more trapped you feel in another man's all-encompassing gloom.
    • 36 Metascore
    • 50 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    A well-made, reasonably diverting night at the multiplex that will seem overly familiar to everyone except teenage girls.
    • 38 Metascore
    • 50 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    Suffice to say that Shawn Levy, director of the "Cheaper by the Dozen" movies, is no Blake Edwards; for every finely tuned slapstick fillip, there's a ton of messy, family-friendly buffoonery.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 50 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    An acceptable but uninspired simulacrum: an overly faithful multiplex translation of a very, very popular airport novel.
  27. Beverly Dollarhide, Nicholas's mother, says of the period after her son's disappearance, "My main goal in life at that time was not to think." Apparently, the filmmakers have taken a cue from her. At least her unwillingness to think makes sense.
  28. If one were to compare this film to one of Jobs’s own products, it would be more like the Cube than the iPod.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 50 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    The movie looks great at least, and the cast includes such stalwarts of Italian cinema as Claudia Gerini and Pierfrancesco Favino.
  29. Little more than a screenful of boy meets boy, boy meets baggage, boy loses baggage.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 50 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    The new version is a shiny piece of hardware that might as well be called "Sleuth 2.0," and it's exactly what you would expect from Pinter: very clever, extremely cold. Maliciously entertaining, too, until the halfway point, when you suddenly start wondering why anyone should care.
  30. It's a parade float atop which Streep can pose and impose. Sometimes her showmanship amounts to shamelessness. She wants us to watch her sack another part.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 50 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    For all its unforgivable blandness, "High School Musical" opens young audiences to the charms of this most transporting of movie genres.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 50 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    Whatever Works is very minor Woody, querulous, fitfully funny, and removed from any shared reality.
  31. Studding your movie with friends, admirers, and sycophants is having a ball; it does not bring us to question the illusory power of cinema or the politics of entertainment.
  32. He doesn't just kill a good buzz. He bludgeons it.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 50 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    Point is, the property is running on bald tires, and, for all its ear-splitting racket and lavish effects, “Apocalypse” is the barest of retreads.
  33. These movies are more about the experience of hearing girls and women who should know better holler at the screen. They could just as well be at a concert.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 50 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    This is no corporate project made to squeeze a few more dollars from a fading cash cow. No one else has been asking for another "Rocky," other than maybe Burt Young . No, this is a rarer beast -- an auteur sequel -- and it's so wrapped up in its maker's personal mythology and psychic needs that it becomes a hall of mirrors to which we're given a slack-jawed ringside seat.
  34. These are truly tedious stakes for an action movie. The franchise isn't worried about world safety. It's fretting over whether to start wearing Depends.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 50 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    Isn't just lame; it's neutered.
  35. We do learn that love heals and that the movie's title makes a terrifically lewd little rock song. (Thank you, Sol.) But that's about it.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 50 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    Essential viewing for builders, graphic designers, visual artists, and other optically inclined folk, but it’s a bit of a slog for the uninitiated.
  36. Takes on provocative and stimulating subject matter, but can't bring it into satisfying dramatic focus, stranding three strong actors who are superior to their material.
  37. Despite the climactic hugs all around and spiritual healing celebrated by a tearful service in the cathedral, some moments en route make an impression.
  38. It's cheap the way The Grey wants to be both a Liam Neeson "Quit Taking My Stuff'' movie and an existential thriller about survival.
  39. There are echoes of Roman Polanski’s “Rosemary’s Baby” in all of this that are impossible to miss.
  40. I wish I could say there is something pleasurable in watching John Goodman reminisce about the good old days while impaled on a steering wheel in the Volvo he's crashed on a California freeway, but I can't find what it is.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 50 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    Directing the film version, Lee gets lost in the grotesque pomp of the halftime spectacle and its lead-up. He gets fine performances from the actors playing the soldiers and a terrible one from Stewart, who flails her arms like an amateur. Martin’s role is beneath his talents, while Vin Diesel’s, as a Zen warrior of a sergeant, is almost beyond belief.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    After an hour of biting charm, Something Wild turns into something else. In a twist that turns the movie into a silly story of violence, Demme surrenders his style to a stupid plot. [7 Nov 1986]
    • Boston Globe
  41. All Dogs Go to Heaven" has the right spirit, and its warmth will offset what for small kids might be some scary moments. But it does seem skimpy and warmed over. [17 Nov 1989]
    • Boston Globe
  42. The idea behind Girl Rising is strikingly simple and even more strikingly imaginative.
    • 34 Metascore
    • 50 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    Completely unnecessary but painless, like dentistry performed by mimes.
  43. Far and Away is a throwback to the handsome but stodgy historical romances Hollywood used to make, and it can at least be said that it's more ambitious than most of what we'll see this summer. [22 May 1992]
    • Boston Globe
    • 47 Metascore
    • 50 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    One of the most lazily scripted, poorly structured, smugly stereotyped star vehicles in recent memory. Bizarrely, this seems to be the point.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    Rockwell is a hoot as Frankie, but during the stretches when he's not on screen, the air goes out of the film.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 50 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    It's just another happily idiotic Will Ferrell comedy, ably directed by Jay Roach ("Meet the Parents," "Dinner for Schmucks") and tossing its bawdy jokes at the side of the barn.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 50 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    The movie has a pleasing skinned-knee innocence that makes you wish everything else about it wasn't so shoddy.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 50 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    Of the two French films opening in the Boston area today - "Beloved" is the other - Little White Lies is the less ambitious, more watchable, and ultimately more annoying.
  44. More to the point, the title doubles as accusation. Progress is dangerous and requires survival tactics, just as a hurricane or avalanche does.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    In this TV reality show masquerading as a movie documentary, Brian Herzlinger is a creepy voyeur, a run-of-the-mill loser who obsesses about living the celebrity high life but lacks the talent to pull it off.
    • 28 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    Molly Hartley is dull at worst and surprisingly spooky at best.
  45. But that ending is a whopper all the same: a heartless blast of tragedy, exploitation, amusement, and general flagrance.
  46. It's too fragmented and diffuse to ever bring its parts together in any really satisfying manner.
  47. It's a movie so late in noticing a shift in American male grooming that for a documentary on the subject to work, Spurlock would either have to pitch it to our grandparents (or be a grandparent) or trace the arc of the shift and unpack it.
  48. Before long, it runs out of steam, playing like the pilot for a TV sitcom called "Baby Knows Best." [13 Oct 1989, p.37]
    • Boston Globe
  49. The problem with this adaptation of Lawrence Block’s detective yarn isn’t that it casts Neeson in a role we’re seeing him play again and again. It’s that no one else in the movie makes a character feel nearly as broken-in and fully inhabited as he does.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 50 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    A sweet, splattery bit of in-jokery; if it’s not actually a good movie, on some level you have to admire the chutzpah of a film set in 1850s Ireland but shot on Staten Island.
  50. A more convincing star could make this a degree more tolerable, although in Cyrus’s defense not much more.
  51. Doing nothing special, Freeman manages to make the picture seem wiser, funnier, and more eloquent than it is.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 50 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    It's the sort of thing you'll either find enchanting or an excellent reason to reach for the Scotch.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 50 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    This Equalizer is a brooding, brutal origin tale, one that starts well but steadily caves into genre clichés. It’s a B-movie sheep in A-movie clothing, acceptable meathead mayhem as long as you know what you’re paying for.
  52. The movie seems terrified of true psychological complexity or perversity. It's less a family tragedy than a lousy country dirge.
    • 20 Metascore
    • 50 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    Ultimately, the problem with An American Carol is the problem with far too much political discourse in this country, left or right: It highlights the worst excesses of the opposition for the sole purpose of discrediting the vast middle.
  53. Some of this vigilante-fantasy misbehavior is wickedly funny.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 50 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    Blandly noisy and inoffensively average.
  54. Runs out of fresh ideas about how to make its heroine look nuts.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 50 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    I know the opening credits for a James Bond movie are supposed to be silly, but the start of Spectre achieves almost orgasmic levels of kitsch.

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