Boston Globe's Scores

For 5,814 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 55% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 43% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 0.5 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Movie review score: 63
Highest review score: 100 Born on the Fourth of July
Lowest review score: 0 Porky's
Score distribution:
5814 movie reviews
    • 89 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    But as good as it is, the film falls short of translating the exaltation and near-gospel music feel of the band in full flight. [2 Nov 1984]
    • Boston Globe
  1. It’s clear To is striving to keep the action gripping and creative. Modestly inspired is more like it.
  2. It seems more a geek show than a slab of marketing wizardry.
  3. All the movie's good style goes to waste on a not terribly compelling conceit and loosely sketched characters.
  4. These are truly tedious stakes for an action movie. The franchise isn't worried about world safety. It's fretting over whether to start wearing Depends.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 50 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    A textbook case of filmmakers who can't make up their minds about their characters; it's a failure of nerve disguised as dramatic ambiguity.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 50 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    Watching Melancholia is like being stuck next to a brilliant depressive at a dinner party. The food is exquisite, the conversation scintillating, and the longer you sit there the more trapped you feel in another man's all-encompassing gloom.
  5. Full of action, but no soul.
  6. Perhaps Flynn, who did the adaptation, has been a little too faithful to her novel. The faux-punchiness of her dialogue doesn’t help matters. The characters sound like people trying to sound like people in the movies and not quite pulling it off.
  7. Is it being a spoilsport to suggest that the Hubble’s original 2-D images are a lot more stupendous than all the IMAX 3-D hurly-burly?
  8. Despite the material’s fit, the story’s relentlessly downbeat tone is challenging. Strong performances by Logan Lerman (“Fury”) and Sarah Gadon (Hulu’s “11.22.63”) can’t keep the film from feeling like exhaustingly slow going.
  9. Watching the uncertain and disappointing new apartheid documentary Amandla! A Revolution in Four-Part Harmony'' is like going to the lecture of an impassioned but really disorganized professor.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    Lawrence Kasdan's Body Heat--an homage to film noir--gets off to a nice start before it becomes entangled in its convoluted and somewhat uninteresting plot machinations.
    • Boston Globe
    • 77 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    Potrykus seems to be going for a critique of disengaged youth stuck in a corporate dystopia of dead-end jobs and fear of life itself. But as a “Clerks” for the Millennial generation, the social commentary of Buzzard tastes about as half baked as the Hot Pocket in Marty’s toaster oven.
  10. Beverly Dollarhide, Nicholas's mother, says of the period after her son's disappearance, "My main goal in life at that time was not to think." Apparently, the filmmakers have taken a cue from her. At least her unwillingness to think makes sense.
  11. The Graduate is not subtle in its writing off of the parental generation as hopelessly corrupt. [Review of re-release]
    • Boston Globe
  12. Harmless enough, but "indie comedy" sounds like something better seen at Urban Outfitters than at a movie theater.
  13. It's taken Dreamgirls 25 years and several false starts to get to the screen, so it's a shame to see what a rush job it feels like.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 50 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    The film's case against overdevelopment needs to be, and could be, aggressive, airtight. It should play to the unconverted. Instead, The Unforeseen gives us . . . poetry.
  14. While Last of the Mohicans is an eyeful - how could anything shot in the Blue Ridge Mountains of North Carolina not be? - it's mindless, meticulous in its externals, taking refuge from awareness by clinging to Cooper's distortions. In the end, it'll be remembered for its three S's: Stowe, Studi and the scenery. [25 Sep 1992, p.27]
    • Boston Globe
  15. As films about the young and the horny go, I preferred the smarter approach director Jeffrey Blitz takes in "Rocket Science."
    • 75 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    An Officer and a Gentleman has so many echoes that it never finds its own voice. [29 Jul 1982]
    • Boston Globe
    • 75 Metascore
    • 50 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    This payback-revenge storyline, told mostly at night with minimal dialogue, is tense but familiar, and Bruno's quick-draw costume changes are fun to watch.
  16. The characters are intended to be slightly stupid, but the writing isn’t necessarily smarter.
  17. You want the movie to stir your soul, push your intellect, or at the very least, break your heart. But it's such a repetitive and thinly constructed piece of filmmaking that the scope and complexity of Sampedro's case are turned to porridge.
  18. The Last King of Scotland joins the ranks of nightmarish innocents-abroad movies, from "Midnight Express" to "Hostel," where the disillusioned hero fights to return to civility.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 50 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    Primarily a one-man show for Darroussin, and the actor, a longtime pro in the French film industry, comes through with a scarifyingly believable portrayal.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 50 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    The film's a minuet fetishistically repeated until either the audience or the lovers go crazy. I'd say it was a tie.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 50 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    Barrels along on a diverting enough sugar high, but in the hangover that follows you may wonder where the wonder was.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 50 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    The movie trades the paranoia of modern omni-cam culture for a tighter, more personal drama, and while it sticks with you, you feel the missed opportunity like a phantom leg.

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