Charlotte Observer's Scores

  • Movies
For 1,454 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 57% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 40% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 2.5 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Movie review score: 64
Highest review score: 100 The Squid and the Whale
Lowest review score: 0 Waist Deep
Score distribution:
1,454 movie reviews
  1. An articulate plea to Westerners not to repeat these terrible sins of omission.
  2. The film has two active virtues, too. It shows human beings in all their pitiable, noble, stupid or sensitive modes of action, and it reminds us there's always time to fall in love, if only for a few days.
  3. Enchanted charmingly reworks all the old favorites while incorporating fresh twists of its own.
  4. The leads blend as seamlessly as any young-old character coupling I've seen. The prosthetically altered Gordon-Levitt, unrecognizable at first, really resembles Willis.
  5. Gandolfini's fans expect something quirky whenever he shows up, and they'll get what they've bargained for.
  6. Every era gets the Robin Hood it needs…Now director Ridley Scott and writer Brian Helgeland have given us an intelligent, layered story suited to our grim, patience-trying times.
  7. The funniest, crassest, wildest, most musical, most satirical and most scatological of the Powers trilogy. And you get to watch Britney Spears' head explode. What more could you want?
  8. The irony is, this family isn't mismatched: All six bickering characters are connected by empathy as well as blood, and we wait for them to figure that out.
  9. Those of us who admire Charles Portis' novel have waited 40 years for a screen version that's as literal as possible – and the Coen brothers just about deliver it.
  10. The plot is thin: You'll guess the villain early, then pick holes in story construction. But Black's ear for mock-noir speeches doesn't fail him, and he gleefully parodies the chase scenes that dominated his action movies.
  11. The chorus backs the soloists powerfully, and they are as fresh as the rest of the film: fat and fit, homely and handsome, young gods and old codgers – in short, people you might really see in Greece. Reality in a musical? That alone makes it worth your open-eared attention.
  12. The rabbits, foolishly introduced to a land that couldn't support them as they bred and dispersed, are symbols of the English: ravenous, unheeding, ineradicable and a constant threat to the native way of life.
  13. Can be unbearably moving or annoyingly mawkish, sometimes in the same scene.
  14. Talkies may have killed silent movies, the way TV serials and soap operas wiped out radio dramas. But there are stories most effectively told in the old style, and The Artist is proof.
  15. This is a game of numbers, not personalities, and a shrewd man wants the bigger numbers on his side when historians pick up their pens.
  16. Two things keep the film off Disney's top shelf. First, Naveen is a dull hero; his good-natured vanity isn't engaging until late in the story. Second, Newman's songs are less bland than usual but no more memorable.
  17. (Mendes') film debut shows he can shock not only with noise and nakedness but with subtle observations.
  18. It's a gentle look at people who cut themselves off from others and realize consequences too late. If Southern Baptists believed in karma, this would be their touchstone.
  19. The most sophisticated and satisfying ghost story on film since "The Sixth Sense."
  20. In rare cases – and The Woman in Black is one of them – a story may be more atmospheric when less is left to the imagination.
  21. You can't root for Ronnie. You can't identify with him. You can't hope he gets the girl – any girl. But you may want to look on with stunned fascination as he ticks away, ready to explode.
  22. Picks up steam from the ominous opening scene and ends as a quietly suspenseful thriller.
  23. Li plays haughty, brilliant wushu master Huo Yuanjia, whose recklessness leads to tragedy after he becomes a champion at the end of the 19th century.
  24. The film offers an unusually rounded picture of a Latino family. All the men work, getting up early to do blue-collar jobs that demand dedication and responsible behavior. (We don't see much of them, but they have a strong presence in the household.)
  25. Most of the actors live their roles, and Fassbender (Rochester in the last "Jane Eyre") is superb as the wolflike, undisciplined assassin.
  26. Anyone who enjoys the novels of Ed McBain, the Oscar-winning "All the President's Men" or any televised variation of "CSI" will be at home here.
  27. To adapt it for a 130-minute movie, Irving ruthlessly cut away subplots, eliminated supporting characters and pared down the traits of the ones that remain.
  28. Turn a potentially unforgettable movie into a broad crowd-pleaser that sustains itself on three acting performances.
  29. Yi Yi is an intimate movie, for all its length and complexity.
  30. Gone Baby Gone would be an accomplishment with anyone at the helm; from a first-timer, it's a revelation.

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