Chicago Sun-Times' Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
For 4,621 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 75% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 23% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 9.4 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Movie review score: 71
Highest review score: 100 The Interrupters
Lowest review score: 0 Movie 43
Score distribution:
4,621 movie reviews
  1. Disclosure contains an inspiring terrific shot of Demi Moore's cleavage in a Wonderbra, surrounded by 125 minutes of pure goofiness leading up to, and resulting from, this moment.
  2. The Distinguished Gentleman prefers to give us measured laughs at a leisurely pace, and then it settles for the sellout upbeat ending. Ho hum.
  3. Far and Away is a movie that joins astonishing visual splendor with a story so simple-minded it seems intended for adolescents.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    But the later Rocky movies have been low on inspiration and eager to repeat the same formula, in which everything leads up to a climactic fight scene and a triumphant fadeout. Stallone is smart enough that he could have made this series into a meditation on sports celebrity in America, but that theme has always been at the edge of the stories; the formula takes center ring. If Rocky seems to be running on autopilot, that's also the case for the other characters. [16 Nov 1990, p.49]
    • Chicago Sun-Times
  4. If it does nothing else, Another 48 HRS reminds us that Murphy is a big, genuine talent. Now it's time for him to make a good movie.
  5. The more you think about what really happens in Cocktail, the more you realize how empty and fabricated it really is.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    As amiable and formfitting as Ghostbusters II can be, it's a thin, dimly conceived affair. For all its rave-up special effects, it adds little to director Ivan Reitman's original, which itself was no fountain of wit but at least had a fresh gimmick going for it. [16 Jun 1989, p.37]
    • Chicago Sun-Times
  6. People may go to see Eddie Murphy once, twice, three or even six times in disposable movies like Harlem Nights, but if he wants to realize his potential he needs to work with a better writer and director than himself.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    Big
    It's too involved in administering its reversion fantasy to acquisition-guilty yuppies to cast an eye on its own venture status. And the contradictions don't stop there. That this celebration of the Peter Pan syndrome was directed by a woman, Penny Marshall, adds another layer of dishonesty. [3 Jun 1988, p.31]
    • Chicago Sun-Times
  7. Director Peter MacDonald keeps the action exploding across the screen, building to a climactic game of "chicken" between Rambo in a Russian tank and the Soviet commander in a helicopter. Gung-ho Rambo fans won't be disappointed. [25 May 1988, p.43]
    • Chicago Sun-Times
  8. All of the materials are in place for a film that might have pleased Orwell. But somehow they never come together.
  9. It's a visually effective and often scary film to watch, but the story is so leaky that we finally just give up.
  10. Great energy and creativity went into the construction, production and direction of this movie, but it doesn't have a story that does justice to the production.
  11. The screenplay, by Sara Parriott and Josann McGibbon, has a good feel for female best-friend relationships, and the dialogue has life and edge to it.
  12. The beauty of Twilight Zone -- The Movie is the same as the secret of the TV series: It takes ordinary people in ordinary situations and then (can you hear Rod Serling?) zaps them with "next stop -- the Twilight Zone!"
  13. Lots of sight gags and one-liners are attempted, but few of them succeed. The cast is talented but stranded in weak material.
  14. Watching this film I reflected that there are only so many Cracker Jacks you can eat before you decide to hell with the toy.
  15. In the end, I'm conflicted about the film. As an accessible family film, it delivers the goods. But it lives in the shadow of "March of the Penguins." Despite its sad scenes, it sentimentalizes.
  16. The movie is focused on two kinds of chemistry: of the kitchen, and of the heart. The kitchen works better.
  17. If you're a fan of Hector Lavoe and Latin music, or Lopez and Anthony, you'll want to see El Cantante for what's good in it. Otherwise, you may be disappointed. The director (Leon Ichaso) and his co-writers haven't licked a crucial question: Why do we need to see this movie and not just listen to the music?
  18. The whole movie is so solemn, so worshipful toward its theme, that it's finally just silly.
  19. Once you realize it's only going to be so good, you settle back and enjoy that modest degree of goodness, which is at least not badness, and besides, if you're watching Rush Hour 3, you obviously didn't have anything better to do, anyway.
  20. The movie is a first-time directorial effort by Justin Theroux, a splendid actor, son of the writer Phyllis, nephew of the novelist Paul. He might have done better to have taken on something by them.
  21. In The Hottest State, Hawke uses fairly standard childhood motivations for his unhappiness and reveals too little real interest in the Sara character.
  22. This movie, for all its noble intentions, is a bore.
  23. Here is a great story born to be creepy, and the movie churns through it like a road company production. If the first three movies served as parables for their times, this one keeps shooting off parable rockets that fizzle out.
  24. There seem to be two movies going on here at the same time, and December Boys would have been better off going all the way with one of them.
  25. Everything is brought together at the end in a flash of revelation that is spectacularly underwhelming.
  26. Benton has made better movies, but this one has no organic reality.
  27. There are small moments of real humor.

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