Chicago Tribune's Scores

For 5,173 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 63% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 35% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 2.9 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Movie review score: 66
Highest review score: 100 Man on Wire
Lowest review score: 0 Chappie
Score distribution:
5173 movie reviews
  1. A fierce, brilliant film that breaks (and then mends) your heart.
  2. Sarandon delivers one of her very best performances; her shock at encountering the wrath of the victim's family is registered beautifully. And Sean Penn, who for too long has suffered with the label of being a "bad boy," gives an Oscar-caliber performance.[12 January 1996, Friday, p.B]
    • Chicago Tribune
  3. May show both director and star working at their professional peaks, but I don't think it's as good as that underappreciated masterwork "A.I." It's not as resonant and daring, not as full of magic and marvel. Spielberg stretches himself technically here but not emotionally.
  4. Delicately subversive, hypnotically sardonic, full of terror, banality and wafer-thin lyricism.
  5. Even with its limitations, I find Silent Light spellbinding.
  6. All but sweeps you away with its dazzling technique and shattering emotion. [27 November 1996, Tempo, p.1]
    • Chicago Tribune
  7. Toy Story is a complete joy.
  8. Wonderful performances by Donald Sutherland, Mary Tyler Moore, and Timothy Hutton. [19 Dec 1980, p.2-10]
    • Chicago Tribune
  9. Stone is spectacular, and she's reason enough to see La La Land. Chazelle is a born filmmaker, and he doesn't settle for rehashing familiar bits from musicals we already love. He's too busy giving us reasons to fall for this one.
  10. Finding Nemo and its Pixar predecessors tap into the shared gene among the kids and adults that delights in imagination-engaging, eye-tickling and wit-filled storytelling. You connect to these sea creatures as you rarely do with humans in big-screen adventures. The result: a true sunken treasure.
  11. Though it's a sad, somber, deeply questioning work, it's done with a light, loving spirit.
  12. One of the most curious and perversely brilliant films ever made in the American studio system. It's a shining example of qualities we don't normally see in our big theatrical pictures: vast ambition, huge resources and technical genius mated to a unique and compelling vision of life.
  13. Loach is a super-realist, and Sweet Sixteen has the disarming feel of a documentary. It's a film that miraculously catches life on the fly, without apparent embellishment, cliche or melodrama.
  14. Pulp Fiction isn't just funny. It's outrageously funny. [14 Oct 1994]
    • Chicago Tribune
  15. A great, velvety, beautiful anachronism. It's a movie almost drunk on romance, literature and cinema, a splendid period picture that keeps rashly breaking rules and boundaries [17 Sept 1993, Friday, p.A]
    • Chicago Tribune
  16. A beautiful film, harrowing, tough and rife with grief.
  17. It is enraging yet nuanced, an elusive combination for any documentary.
  18. The Sun sheds only so much literal light on its chosen subject; it's a film of shadows and silence, the calm before and after the storm. But everything you see and hear carries weight and an eerie poetic undercurrent.
  19. Green is a rare bird in American filmmaking: a humanist who knows how to tell a story.
  20. This is a superb film and one of Nicholson's great performances, tamped down but magnetic.
  21. More than a great love story. It's both a lighthearted and deeply impassioned inspirational lesson about life. [4 April 1986]
    • Chicago Tribune
  22. Sold as a romance, but actually is one of the funniest pictures to come out in quite some time. [15 Jan 1988]
    • Chicago Tribune
  23. It's a joy. Altman does Dallas the way he did "Nashville" in Nashville or Hollywood in "The Player."
    • Chicago Tribune
  24. One of the most beautiful of all recent films on the problems of old age -- and on the interplay of theater and life.
  25. Of all the movies that try to take us into the mind and viewpoint of a child, Carol Reed's 1948 The Fallen Idol, adapted by Graham Greene from his short story, is one of the most ingenious.
  26. The movie's neither hopeful in contrived ways, nor hopeless in different contrived ways. Somehow it manages to be wonderful.
  27. A sweet, sharp coming-of-age romance, Adventureland is a little warmer, a little funnier and a lot more truthful than the last 20 or 30 of its ilk. Especially its Hollywood ilk.
  28. Among its many excellences, Vera Drake functions superbly as a pure thriller; the last half is reminiscent in structure and detail of Hitchcock's "The Wrong Man."
  29. Not since Robert Altman took on “Popeye” a generation ago, and lost, has a major director addressed such a well-loved, all-ages title. This time everything works, from tip to tail.
  30. Steering clear of phony melodrama and indie pretense, Baumbach captures a crisis in one family's life that, though it shakes the foundation, leaves all four Berkmans drifting toward highs and lows unknown, each of them only dimly aware that, no matter what the movies tell us, we never really come of age.

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