Chicago Tribune's Scores

For 4,541 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 63% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 35% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 3.8 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Movie review score: 66
Highest review score: 100 The French Connection (re-release)
Lowest review score: 0 UHF
Score distribution:
4,541 movie reviews
  1. The superb United 93, from the British writer-director Paul Greengrass, does not waste time defining the undefinable. Nor does it strain for poetry when, with this story, prose is enough.
  2. Delicately subversive, hypnotically sardonic, full of terror, banality and wafer-thin lyricism.
  3. The more you learn, the more questions you have about life in that Great Neck house. Leo Tolstoy wrote that "every unhappy family is unhappy in its own fashion," but not even he could have invented the Friedmans.
  4. The whole movie, a feast of ensemble wiles and stunning hair, is juicy, funny and alive.
  5. Still packs a wallop. It's also a movie with no easy passage to its dark heart.
    • 90 Metascore
    • 88 Critic Score
    Without significantly changing the books’ content, they bring in a wealth of emotional tones--particularly a playful, wry humor.
  6. Dislocated from their native country and former lives, Bob and Charlotte come to establish a language of their own. Coppola has done the same, proving she boasts one of today's truly distinct filmmaking voices.
  7. A major cinema event of the year, a masterpiece of Italian film traditions in social/political realism and historical family epic.
  8. A rich and troubling documentary highlight of the year.
  9. Works beautifully, both as a social and psychological drama and as a taut, tightly wired thriller.
  10. It's as thrilling and lushly beautiful a movie as has been released all year, matched only by Zhang's epic "Hero." And I think this film is the more powerful.
  11. The film itself is perfectly poised between artistry and audacity. It's beautiful.
  12. Borat is a rarity: a comedy whose middle name is danger, or as the Kazakhs say, kauwip-kater.
  13. As is, Cotillard (nominated for best actress) scrupulously avoids melodrama. There's enough without it, in watching a story of an ordinary woman argue for her dignity, her colleagues' better instincts and her own livelihood.
  14. The creator of the original "Mad Max" trilogy has whipped up a gargantuan grunge symphony of vehicular mayhem that makes "Furious 7" look like "Curious George."
  15. It's good for the soul, and composer Joe Hisaishi's themes are so right they sound as if they came straight out of the ground with the girl in the bamboo.
  16. May be the best and saddest film of the year so far.
  17. The acting's so true, and Bahrani's so observant, you find yourself caring about everyone onscreen.
  18. Like "Lincoln," written by Tony Kushner and directed by Steven Spielberg, DuVernay's Selma ushers us into the world of the backstage, back-room and back-scratching political process, dramatizing how the sausage was actually made.
  19. The Artist may not be great art, but it's pearly entertainment.
  20. In Jan Campion's The Piano, the emotions are deep, fierce, primordial. Sexuality overwhelms the film's characters like ocean waves blasting against a cliffside. [19 Nov 1993]
    • Chicago Tribune
  21. All of the performances are first-rate; Pesci stands out, though, with his seemingly unscripted manner. GoodFellas is easily one of the year's best films. [21 September 1990, Friday, p.C]
    • Chicago Tribune
  22. Always engaging, never boring. You constantly appreciate Kaufman's intelligence and Gondry's lively filmmaking.
  23. German emigre Dupont directs all this with the style, flair and tension he brought to his 1925 Emil Jannings classic, "Variety." But it is Wong, shimmering with charisma, who gives Piccadilly its unforgettable center.
  24. The word masterpiece costs nothing to write and means less than nothing in an age when every third picture and each new Clint Eastwood project is proclaimed as such. After two viewings, however, Letters From Iwo Jima strikes me as the peak achievement in Eastwood's hallowed career.
  25. It's a very small piece, working in a deceptively casual storytelling style. But it's my favorite music film since "Stop Making Sense," and it's more emotionally satisfying than any of the Broadway-to-Hollywood adaptations made in the last 20 years.
  26. The greatest rock concert movie ever made -- and maybe the best rock movie, period.
  27. What I did like unreservedly was the acting. Enid, as enacted by the sometimes astonishing Birch, is one of the more convincing, no-nonsense teens in recent movies.
  28. Raunchy, smart, ebullient, melancholy, insightful, surprising, funny, frank and sexy as all get-out.
  29. The movie's excellence, a stylistic world apart from the strikingly photographed but rather hysterical 1967 film version of Capote's masterwork, is in capturing its subject without pinning him down.

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