Christian Science Monitor's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
For 3,626 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 56% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 42% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 4.3 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Movie review score: 66
Highest review score: 100 Control Room
Lowest review score: 0 Vegas Vacation
Score distribution:
3,626 movie reviews
  1. Wants to appear bold and liberated, but it seems awfully solemn about the subculture it explores.
  2. The film would work better if its story unfolded more swiftly and if its twists were more unexpected. The acting is solid, though.
  3. Any resemblance (except qualitatively) to "An Officer and A Gentleman" is strictly unaccidental.
  4. Along with the lapses of taste that have become standard in pictures aimed at teen audiences, filmmaker John Hughes offers moments of wit and warmth.
  5. The writer-director Andrew Niccol is best known for writing "The Truman Show," another movie that got carried away by doomsday deep-think. The deep-think here is even sillier.
  6. The package would be more enticing if it didn't fall so squarely into overused Hollywood formulas.
  7. A creaky and slow-going morality play.
  8. The action, directed by Shane Black, ranges from passable to interminable. The plot goes from clang to bang. Downey Jr. is still the best thing about this series.
  9. This comedy is as down-and-dirty as you'd expect from the Farrelly team...but more than one sequence manages to be hilarious on its own outrageously crass terms.
  10. Polson's well-filmed thriller swims down the usual lanes for this sort of story, and everyone looks way too old for senior year; but many of the suspense scenes work fine, and Bradford is terrific as the endangered hero.
  11. Mostly just another exercise in snappy editing and over-the-top mayhem that will leave most grown-up movie- goers cold.
  12. Moderately amusing sequel, which is best when it relies on dead-pan acting by the stars, worst when it drags in summer-movie stupidities like an incessantly talking dog.
  13. In all, the film is a striking, if flawed, achievement by a talented actor who may become an important director if he sticks to the genre that suits him best.
  14. The story is as simple as the average football cheer, but the dialogue has amusing echoes of "Clueless," and Dunst and Bradford make a mighty cute couple.
  15. It's always hard to predict what Winterbottom will try next, but this experiment isn't worth repeating, the lively concert scenes notwithstanding. Be forewarned that the sexual scenes aren't simulated.
  16. Young viewers may guffaw, but seasoned fans of "There's Something About Mary" will be disappointed.
  17. W.
    Stone may think he's made a movie about the toxicity of the Bush presidency, but what we have instead is a cautionary tale of a decidedly lower order. As far as I can make out, the real message of W. is: Don't vote for anybody who talks with his mouth full of food.
  18. Something happens to Robin Williams in serious roles. He becomes so drab that it's almost as if he's trying to efface himself from the screen.
  19. Is it possible to truly start life all over again? Arthur Newman might have been better if it had not started at all.
  20. The honey runs thick in The Secret Life of Bees, and so does the treacle. The cloying dullness sets in early, although not from the first frame.
  21. Eastwood and Morgan are not con artists, but their awe here is so unblinking that their film comes across as a transcendent con job.
  22. It’s like an over-the-hill gang variant on “The Dirty Dozen,” except not as much fun as that sounds.
  23. Is Malick deliberately courting self-parody here? Probably not. That would imply he had a sense of humor.
  24. It seems a bit cruel to cast Garner, who exudes charm, in such a charmless role.
  25. Oldman makes a four-course dinner out of the scenery with enough slash and burn to leave you wondering if he is vying with Nicolas Cage for the title of filmdom's biggest hambone.
  26. If you go to Burlesque expecting a campy hoot on the order of "Showgirls," you may be in for a disappointment. It's not quite awful enough, although it's plenty bad.
  27. Wilson does his callow good-guy routine (if you close your eyes you'd swear he was his brother, Owen) and Thurman looks as if she'd rather be stalking prey in "Kill Bill."
  28. 360
    Morgan is a wonderful writer when he's working from the headlines, but his "personal" movies, like "Hereafter" and this one, release a bleary, pseudo-profound aspect of his talent that's best left in the dark.
  29. The jokes mostly fall flat and the dramatic scenes fall even flatter.
  30. Bug
    If you have claustrophobia and/or fear insects, the last film you should see is Bug. I'm not sure it's worth a trip even if you don't suffer from those maladies.

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