Christian Science Monitor's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
For 3,518 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 56% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 42% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 4 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Movie review score: 66
Highest review score: 100 Silver City
Lowest review score: 0 The Wedding Planner
Score distribution:
3,518 movie reviews
    • 51 Metascore
    • 42 Critic Score
    The casting of both Riegert and Allen may sound like an "Animal House" reunion, but the two have no scenes together.
  1. It is not the redemptive uplift that I am objecting to here. It's the way that Bier manipulates us in order to send us aloft. She wants the world to be a better place. Fine. But what she has concocted here is an arty version of the same old Hollywood dumb-down dramaturgy. It just has a higher gloss.
  2. It seems a bit cruel to cast Garner, who exudes charm, in such a charmless role.
  3. This semiexpressionist fantasia is a botch.
  4. The flashback sequences sometimes come across like "'For Whom the Bell Tolls' for Dummies."
  5. Foster seems blinkered and tone-deaf to what's actually appearing onscreen.
  6. Writer-director Massy Tadjedin cuts back and forth between these twin temptations. Will Michael succumb and prove Joanna correct in her suspicions? Will Alex's French accent conquer all? Do you care? I didn't.
  7. The only saving grace is that this time around, the script (yes, there is one, and it was concocted by Ehren Kruger) has occasional wisps of lucidity, and Bay delivers – overdelivers – on the mayhem.
  8. Since the only really good "Planet of the Apes" movie was the 1968 original with Charlton Heston, I've always wondered why filmmakers can't just leave well enough alone.
  9. The problem with this year-by-year structure is that the slow crawl to the end can seem agonizing if the film isn't engaging. And One Day, despite strenuous attempts by all involved to make us laugh, cry, and laugh-cry, is more likely to induce winces. We've seen it all before – and better.
  10. His rise from a marginalized Jewish boy in Nazi-occupied Paris to his chain-smoking fame as the composer of such Euro-hits as "Je t'Aime … Moi Non Plus" is presented as one long, hallucinatory jag, revealing far less about Gainsbourg, I would imagine, than about Sfar.
  11. Frankly, if I'm going to be offered a heaping pile of revisionism about the greatest writer who ever lived, I'd rather it be from someone with more academic heft than the director of "Independence Day" and "Godzilla." I trust the teachers who receive this film's study guide have a shredder handy.
  12. Turns one of the greatest geniuses of German literature into a love-struck rapscallion.
  13. Muddled cop thriller The Son of No One has a top-drawer cast and a bottom-drawer script.
  14. I would imagine that even those who line up for this film will be somewhat let down, if only because it's clear that most of the juicy stuff will arrive in Part 2 – which won't be released until next November.
  15. The cast, at least on paper, is formidable, if ill-used.
  16. What this film really celebrates is crunch-and-thud video-game-style action, not especially well choreographed by director Guy Ritchie.
  17. The best thing about the film is the majestic mountain vistas, shot in Canada. You can practically inhale them.
  18. The film is more testimonial than drama.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 42 Critic Score
    Stephen Root, Ted Danson, Dermot Mulroney, and other familiar faces lend their support, but it's not enough to overcome the limp, by-the-numbers execution. The film comprises innumerable expository scenes, leavened with uninspired comic relief.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 42 Critic Score
    Harrelson is effective, but the film isn't helped by the inevitable comparisons to the far superior "L.A. Confidential" and "Bad Lieutenant" movies.
  19. This movie is "Finian's Rainbow" for dunderheads. Rudd has a few amusing moments talking to himself in a mirror (he's trying to convince himself he's a stud) but he would have been better off talking himself out of this film.
  20. The idiocy of the film's conceit is that Simon recruits innocents like Will to carry out these vigilante killings.
  21. The plot slogs along and family secrets are hauled out, each more implausible than the next.
  22. 360
    Morgan is a wonderful writer when he's working from the headlines, but his "personal" movies, like "Hereafter" and this one, release a bleary, pseudo-profound aspect of his talent that's best left in the dark.
  23. Potty jokes and bawdy gross-outs predominate, and the few good laughs are swamped by the overall laughlessness.
  24. As for me, I don't see why women being as slobby and gross as the guys is such a feminist breakthrough – especially since, as in Bachelorette, the slobbiness and grossness is witless.
  25. Sean Penn is one of those actors, like Nicolas Cage, who is best (sometimes worst) when he's over-the-top. Unlike Cage, Penn doesn't pour himself into dreadful commercial vehicles. No, his dreadful movies are usually not destined for the multiplex. Case in point: This Must Be the Place.
  26. One of the many, many things wrong with Joe Wright's Anna Karenina, starring Keira Knightley as literature's most famous adulteress – take that, Emma Bovary! – is that one never feels the love. It's a conceit in search of a movie. It could just as easily have been titled "Décor."
  27. The jokes mostly fall flat and the dramatic scenes fall even flatter.

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