Christian Science Monitor's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
For 3,674 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 56% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 42% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 4.2 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Movie review score: 66
Highest review score: 100 Guerrilla: The Taking of Patty Hearst
Lowest review score: 0 Mixed Nuts
Score distribution:
3,674 movie reviews
    • 51 Metascore
    • 42 Critic Score
    The casting of both Riegert and Allen may sound like an "Animal House" reunion, but the two have no scenes together.
  1. Perhaps Nair believes that heroism in our tabloid era has become degraded. If so, she overcorrected. Amelia is so pure in heart that it slides right off the screen.
  2. As the boarding school honcho Father Benedictus, Geoffrey Rush chews so much scenery that he looks ready to burst.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 42 Critic Score
    It's a distasteful jumble that stirs up the worst instincts of its audience by heaping abuse on Bill, encouraging us to identify with him, then prodding us to enjoy his bursts of venom and violence. [1 Mar 1993]
    • Christian Science Monitor
  3. The cast, at least on paper, is formidable, if ill-used.
  4. Ought to have been state of the art. But there's not a whole lot of artistry to be found in this movie.
  5. This movie is "Finian's Rainbow" for dunderheads. Rudd has a few amusing moments talking to himself in a mirror (he's trying to convince himself he's a stud) but he would have been better off talking himself out of this film.
  6. I kept expecting Sacha Baron Cohen to traipse onto the scene. Alas, he doesn’t.
  7. By turns antic, frantic, and dull, "Pippa Lee" is unconvincing – emotionally, dramatically, filmically.
  8. 42
    The filmmaking is TV-movie-of-the-week dull and Robinson’s ordeal is hammered home to the exclusion of virtually everything else in his life.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 42 Critic Score
    A young and as-yet-unformed actor, Stewart is cast in a role she's simply not ready for, and her effort to work hard – exactly what any actor must hide from the audience – is painfully visible in every scene. By contrast, Pattinson is smooth as glass, a born movie star who only needs to slant his eyes to grab attention.
  9. Blanchett miraculously gives a good performance, even when saddled with lines like this one, to Clive Owen's Sir Walter Raleigh: "In another world, could you have loved me?"
  10. Sometimes empty is just empty. What Gertrude Stein said about Oakland can also apply to Somewhere: "There is no there there."
  11. The plot slogs along and family secrets are hauled out, each more implausible than the next.
  12. Being touted as the first film ever shot in the Smithsonian complex. With any luck, it will also be the last. This is not the best use of our landmarks.
  13. How can we take this doomsday scenario seriously when we keep waiting for Bruce Willis to rise from the ashes?
  14. One of the many, many things wrong with Joe Wright's Anna Karenina, starring Keira Knightley as literature's most famous adulteress – take that, Emma Bovary! – is that one never feels the love. It's a conceit in search of a movie. It could just as easily have been titled "Décor."
  15. There is no reason why Reservation Road could not have been great. George has co-written some powerful films in the past, including two for Daniel Day-Lewis, "In the Name of the Father" and "The Boxer." He is not wrong to want to mainline intensity here, but the inner lives of these men have not been explored, only displayed.
  16. Turns one of the greatest geniuses of German literature into a love-struck rapscallion.
  17. Muddled cop thriller The Son of No One has a top-drawer cast and a bottom-drawer script.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 42 Critic Score
    Stephen Root, Ted Danson, Dermot Mulroney, and other familiar faces lend their support, but it's not enough to overcome the limp, by-the-numbers execution. The film comprises innumerable expository scenes, leavened with uninspired comic relief.
  18. As for me, I don't see why women being as slobby and gross as the guys is such a feminist breakthrough – especially since, as in Bachelorette, the slobbiness and grossness is witless.
  19. Why would you take your kids to see Space Chimps, an uninspired animated feature about chimp astronauts, when you could take them instead to see "Wall-E"? And if they've already seen "Wall-E," you're really lowering the bar by venturing into this one.
  20. This is the kind of movie where life lessons are posted every quarter-hour. (I timed it.)
  21. The Legend of Zorro, starring Antonio Banderas as the masked one, made me long to re-watch "Zorro the Gay Blade," the great spoof starring George Hamilton. In that film, the Spanish accents were meant to sound deliberately fake.
  22. At least we have Alan Arkin playing the head of CONTROL. His drone and deadpan are a perfect complement to Carell's. But please, pretty please, let's not go for a sequel on this one, OK?
  23. Although the film's visuals are a cut above, say, "Sin City," another serioso graphic novel-turned-movie, it has the same mood: a film-noir-ish soddenness punctuated by megaviolence. Watchmen is the anti-"Incredibles."
  24. Emma Roberts is squeaky-clean to a fault and so is the movie.
  25. As a laughing-through-tears jokester tourist, Richard Dreyfuss provides the only moments of real acting, as opposed to overacting, mugging, and scenery chomping.
  26. If you were a fan of David Cronenberg's "Crash," based on J.G. Ballard's book about people who get sexually excited by auto accidents, you might just be the target audience for Quid Pro Quo, a perverse psychological drama.

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