Christian Science Monitor's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
For 3,841 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 56% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 42% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 3.9 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Movie review score: 66
Highest review score: 100 Sweet Smell of Success (re-release)
Lowest review score: 0 I Now Pronounce You Chuck & Larry
Score distribution:
3841 movie reviews
  1. Wilson has a gawky affability here that helps redeem much that might otherwise seem tasteless (as opposed to tasteless-but-funny).
  2. Bacon lavishes his camera on her (Sedgwick) in various states of dress and undress, but the script, by Hannah Shakespeare - talk about having to live up to a name! - is a cheat. It rarely expands on the boy's crises in having to deal with such a mother.
  3. Resembles a fast-and-flashy variation on "The Sixth Sense," with touches of "The Matrix" as a bonus.
  4. Caine puts all his formidable talent into pulling this off, but Jewison's directing and Roland Harwood's screenplay (based on Brian Moore's novel) provide a regrettably shaky foundation for him to build on.
  5. Barrymore and Busey walk away with the acting honors, but no aspect of the picture is more than mildly entertaining.
  6. The movie is gorgeously filmed and contains some fascinating lore about life in northern climes. But the plot is tritely predictable and far-fetched. Julia Ormond, Gabriel Byrne, and Vanessa Redgrave are among the performers who deliver less than their best.
  7. A promising feature-film debut.
  8. It may not be much of a movie, but it's a terrific concert.
  9. The movie takes no particular stance on the controversies surrounding its heroine, seen by some as a self-serving egomaniac and others as a tireless champion of the poor. Nor can much insight be gleaned from Madonna's energetic but oddly impersonal performance.
  10. Fanboys, directed by Kyle Newman, doesn't delve into the mania of fandom, it exploits it.
  11. At times this indie is as repetitive and self-indulgent as its protagonist, but it captures a bit of the madness of being unrequitedly in love.
  12. Intended as a parody of B-movie fantasies from the '50s, this satire more directly lampoons kiddie thrillers like "Captain Video," putting it perilously close to the pop-culture trash it aims to mock.
  13. Far from a great film, but it certainly stretches the envelope.
  14. Too bad the acting is uneven. And the ineptly done English subtitles will have you laughing in all the wrong places.
  15. True-blue golf buffs should find it a treat. For others it's no deeper than a tin cup on a putting green.
  16. Some scenes are just silly, others are dead-on uproarious. Ditka, a real-life football legend, is a real find as our hero's assistant.
  17. Hackman gives a powerful performance as the killer, and the storytelling is often gripping. But the film contains much extremely offensive language and gratuitous depictions of violence, some of it aimed at children, not needed to get the plot across.
  18. One of a kind, turning Foreman trademarks such as self-satirical acting and out-of-nowhere music into powerful elements of an outlandish story.
  19. Youngsters may enjoy it. But the humor is generally of the genre heard in the boys' locker room at the high school gym.
  20. Country Strong is the latest and, in many ways, the least impressive entrant in the achy-breaky sweepstakes.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 42 Critic Score
    The opening action sequence, unrelated to the main story, is nicely done, but after that it's all downhill.
  21. The result is fine fantasy fun.
  22. Influenced by Billy Wilder's classic "Ace in the Hole," this dark comedy-drama rambles on too long and strains credibility at times.
  23. If, as the ads would lead you to believe, you go to see The Break-Up expecting a romantic comedy, you will be severely disappointed. If you go to it expecting a good movie, you will also be severely disappointed.
  24. Spoiled by its simplistic portrait of people from the Mideast as incorrigibly violent and untrustworthy.
  25. Solomon keeps the drama generally clear and interesting, though some touches make the film-noir plot seem too pretentious.
  26. Fans of Jacquelyn Mitchard's novel may find enough echoes of the book to justify the price of admission. But others can see this sort of thinly crafted melodrama in TV movies every week. For free.
  27. While the production is attractive in a calendar-photo sort of way, there's not a speck of genuine feeling in its glossy images.
  28. Taylor is utterly believable even when the screenplay (from an Anne Tyler novel) is too self-consciously quirky, and Pearce nicely portrays the guy she obsesses over.
  29. Raimi’s film is supposed to be about magic, but magic is in scant supply.

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