Clash Music's Scores

  • Music
For 1,997 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 55% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 42% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 0.3 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Music review score: 72
Highest review score: 100 Bright Phoebus [Reissue]
Lowest review score: 10 Wake Up!
Score distribution:
1997 music reviews
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Beautifully produced and blessed with Guy Garvey in fine voice, it's a small but perfectly formed step forward.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    As ever with this band, it’s sure to be an idiosyncratic but beguiling direction, although there’s no hurry with so much to pick over on this thoughtful latest outing.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    Whilst each track delivers exactly what is to be expected from an IAK album it is a little disappointing that there seems to have been no development from the previous outing.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    It's unfathomably exciting stuff.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Driven by crispy drum machines and shimmering synths, Lanza’s second full-length Hyperdub offering is instantly more direct and relatable than its predecessor; cloudy reverb is replaced by sheeny production.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    A solid debut then, full of yearning and barstool tales.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    It bursts with techno beats that jump wildly from deep and dark to bright and euphoric.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Ultimately, Salad Days is an aural testament to the old adage that there’s a fine line between genius and insanity.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Some of the riffs are quite incredible ('A More Perfect Union'), and the general effect of the whole album is that the listener will want to weep and dance simultaneously. Simply brilliant.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    For TNP converts this will no doubt be regarded as a masterpiece. But for the casual listener, it’s simply another solid 21st century ambient record to help while away the late hours.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    If you can cope with the extreme twee, Heartleap is a diamond.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    It’s her vocal prowess that threads together the line-up of producer-du-jour types that feature on For All We Know. That, and the infectious grooves that dominate this album provide endless enjoyment--18 tracks worth, to be precise.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    All Our Gods Have Abandoned Us isn’t a sonic leap into new pastures, rather it’s the sound of a band nailing their sound and operating at the very top of their game. In a genre as crowded as metalcore, Architects have managed to craft a sound that’s instantly and recognisably Architects.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    The only maturity in their sound is towards a more ambient quarter. Elevator music not quite, but rising out of the background might be an issue.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Fade finds YLT at their most wistfully contemplative; a thought only softened by the paradox that this might just be one of their best yet.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    It’s reality music, and while obviously tailored around the life and times of Shawn Carter, offers so many narratives that the common man can relate to in astounding measures.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    A magnificent aural topography of Kaitlyn Aurelia Smith’s inspired imagination.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Earl Sweatshirt is telling truths rather than forging fantasy, and Doris is a disturbed and penetrating journey into the mind of the boy that came back from Samoa.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    [Gibbs] expertly negotiates Madlib’s minefield, forcefully popping words off the producer’s gorgeously mined snares and snatched vocal loops.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Clements and Griffiths have sculpted something truly special out of their final time with their friend and, while too late for all of the numerous lists, it deserves to be held up as one of the most affecting and impressive releases of a difficult year.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Romare sets out to bring in elements of his distinct sound from across his career always combining it with something fresh and invigorating. The fact that all of these elements come together into such an approachable and restrained album is quite impressive.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    After the impulsive creativity of Logos, Parallax, by contrast, is a much more refined listen.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Rest assured, his remarkable voice and grasp of melody remain undimmed and while it may not sound exactly as you were expecting, it is a bold, distinctive and genuinely excellent record.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    She embraces their words, often of death and reminiscence on youth, as if they’d come from deep within herself. It is, after 38 years, a fine reminder of her vital place in British musical tradition, as the essential elder stateswoman of folk.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    This is an album that can make you weepy in the hazy blur of the wee small hours, and euphoric in the fuzzy afternoon sun.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Rather than risk nestling ever-deeper into their cushy role as purveyors of twee-approved, candied indie-rock, The Radio Dept. have opted for a collection of songs that is as decidedly unapologetic as it is cemented in political sludge.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    The group feel more at home with the methodology of early prog or post-punk, with a sense of the abstract rippling beneath those crystalline waves of perfect sound. Shine on, you diamonds.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    It may spend a lot of its time reflecting on the past. But as an argument for that now famous district in South Los Angeles and its continued importance and centrality to hip-hop, it’s forceful and convincing, and one that ensures those Hollywood-style ‘COMPTON’ letters will continue to loom large--not just over L.A., but over this genre as a whole.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    The album is a bold, idiosyncratic collection of songs crafted under intense time pressure after producer John Congleton insisted that Grant have all of the material ready to go before entering the studio. Such a challenge certainly seems to have focused the mind.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Here everything seems whole and fully realised, the sound of a fleshed out band sure in its own identity rather than the end result of a prolonged mixtape crush.