Denver Post's Scores

  • TV
For 180 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 66% higher than the average critic
  • 1% same as the average critic
  • 33% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 7.6 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average TV Show review score: 73
Highest review score: 100 Frozen Planet: Season 1
Lowest review score: 0 Rob: Season 1
Score distribution:
  1. Mixed: 0 out of 136
  2. Negative: 0 out of 136
136 tv reviews
  1. For better and worse, it feels like an extended version of a "Curb Your Enthusiasm" episode.
  2. There seems to have been a conscious decision to add a dose of not just violence but horrific suspense and shocking violence. The first hour in particular feels like a disappointing departure. The character remains the same, even if he encounters accentuated gore and mental illness in the criminals. He even grows a bit.
  3. The Michael J. Fox Show is not only an enjoyable TV comedy about a likeable guy in a likeable family, it’s not only a step toward wider recognition of a specific disease and of disabilities in general, it’s the return of a primetime icon after years away battling Parkinson’s.
  4. It has the feel of a quirky cable comedy.
  5. Executive producers Haskins and Emily Halpern are sharp and the lines are funny and maybe, just maybe, there’s a show here.
  6. Heavy dysfunction gets a backup laugh track, and it can turn mean. But Lorre knows how to wring dark humor from tragic circumstances.
  7. It’s goofy, but fun.
  8. Cultural commentary mixed with the mystery, along with lavish production values, gives Irving’s tale a clever twist. The hour is trying to cover a lot of bases, but it may find its focus.
  9. The documentary, narrated by Benjamin Bratt (son of a Peruvian mother), is rather dry in spite of the rich subject matter. It's particularly slow-going at the start (the pre-Alamo section is a slog), but it picks up steam as the chronology moves toward the modern age with notables contributing first-person accounts.
  10. The tone ranges from fun to scholarly as colorful drawings enliven the film.
  11. A funny but not particularly inventive political comedy about four Republican Senators sharing a house in Washington, D.C.
  12. Like most docu- reality TV mashups, the need for drama on-screen trumped detailed explanations. Choppy editing comes standard. Still, the tension between the impulse to search and the need for privacy is clear. Emotions run high and the conflict makes for good television.
  13. While the first hour is daunting, the series offers a terrific villainess who also has a knack for humor. [28 Aug 2005, p.F-03]
  14. Grand special effects, impressive acting by the young Sequoyah and an enduring interest in all things supernatural may help Believe to catch on.
  15. A worthy new configuration - the side-splittingly sad sitcom. [2 June 2005, p.F-01]
  16. While the characters are slight and the dialog is silly, there's a story there somewhere.
  17. The extremes of smart and wacky writing styles have never been so much at odds.
  18. Think the Clintons meet "Dallas" in D.C. And that, for six episodes, may be enough.
  19. Conflicts and tortured characters abound. Unfortunately, the drama goes somewhat soggy when the camera leaves the tight confines of the submarine and the complex plotlines twist into knots.
  20. It would be naughty to call it dry. But the lack of personalities leaves the viewer groping for an angle. The overwhelming nature of the event begins to feel overwhelming on the couch, too.
  21. Much of the insanity that drove viewers to “hate-watch” the show in its first season has been scrubbed. Competence reigns. The results are mixed.
  22. It is formulaic but built to last. Think of this expensive remake as 'Touched by a Kimble.'... The workmanlike hour continues to mine old themes of alienation, injustice and the search for truth. [5 Oct 2000, p.E-03]
  23. As the lead character, actor Kevin James has a certain something. We just hope it's not contagious. [21 Sept 1998, p.G-05]
  24. Fans will enjoy picking out the many sight gags and puns in the dense, multilayered animation. But, on first viewing, and unlike "The Simpsons," the "Futurama" pilot isn't fall-off-the-couch funny. [25 Mar 1999]
  25. Funny - barely - in an uncomfortable, theatrical way, some moments feel like performance art or improv exercises, albeit with nice title sequences. [14 Aug 2005]
  26. The talented cast and upbeat pilot work in the series’ favor, but if the half-hour is to be more than a platform for Williams’ improv, the story will have to go deeper. And make us care.
  27. While the atmospherics are great and the cast is impressive, the weight of the film is too much for the slender premise.
  28. Not a brilliant effort, but worth a look.
  29. The likability of a lying, cheating, essentially egomaniacal criminal defense lawyer is a stretch in the first place. It takes a lot of grinning and tousling from Kinnear to make it work.
  30. If you can get past the showy physicality, there's real meat here...Unfortunately, the series is frequently its own worst enemy...Every so often, (it feels like every few scenes), the visuals overwhelm the content, and it's clear the producers are intent on using every bit of license that cable networks allow. Story is overwhelmed by effects. It all becomes "deeply superficial," without the ironic twist. [1 Sept 2006, p.F-01]