Denver Post's Scores

  • TV
For 236 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 65% higher than the average critic
  • 1% same as the average critic
  • 34% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 6.9 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average TV Show review score: 71
Highest review score: 100 Boomtown: Season 1
Lowest review score: 0 Rob: Season 1
Score distribution:
  1. Mixed: 0 out of 172
  2. Negative: 0 out of 172
172 tv reviews
  1. Supremely satisfying. [21 Oct 2004]
    • Denver Post
  2. Viewers should expect a bit of exposition before the series shifts into high gear. By the third episode, bada bing, it's off and running. [13 Jan 2000]
    • Denver Post
  3. The series remains smarter and funnier than most anything on television. ... But be forewarned: the 'Sopranos' season starts slowly and a bit unevenly. [4 Mar 2001]
    • Denver Post
  4. One of the best series anywhere. [8 Jun 2003]
    • Denver Post
  5. David Brent, brilliantly conceived and played by Gervais, remains among the most wonderfully annoying characters in modern TV comedy. [12 Oct 2003]
    • Denver Post
  6. The humor is often obscure. The flavor ranges from silly to heartbreaking, crazy to profound. The Emmy-winning show's unpredictability is part of the charm.
  7. Gritty and grim, The Shield takes the familiar genre to a new level of intensity, graphic violence, nudity and, not least, profanity. The vocabulary may shock some viewers; the casting will surprise others: Michael Chiklis plays the heavy, the corrupt cop at the center of The Shield. It's a riveting star turn. [12 Mar 2002, p.F05]
    • Denver Post
  8. If it's action you seek, Rectify is a poor choice. But for fine cinematography, great acting and probing character development, you'll want to tune in.
  9. The creepiness is slow and almost elegant. The vision is grand, epic even. The music, by Mogwai, is wonderfully absorbing. The whole creation, by Fabrice Gobert, is first-rate supernatural drama more than a mere horror show.
  10. What follows is a rich, funny, touching exploration not just of transgender life, but of family, identity and sexuality in general. Tambor's genius in the role is in creating a very particular female character well beyond makeup and wardrobe, seemingly on the cellular level.
  11. An engrossing drama about a modern seaside town that comes unraveled with the mysterious death of a young boy.
  12. This is high-definition bliss.
  13. This season's three installments--"Scandal in Bohemia" is followed by a scary "The Hounds of Baskerville" and "The Reichenbach Fall" in which nemesis Moriarty (Andrew Scott) returns--make a pleasingly diverse set.
  14. The horrors of war, the danger of shifting alliances and the anguish of intra-family rivalries raise the dramatic stakes, matched by the glorious visuals.
  15. The Corner is a marvel - a powerful testament to the crumbling inner city, the Catch-22 of urban social services, and the strengths and vulnerabilities of the human spirit. [16 Apr 2000, p.K-09]
    • Denver Post
  16. Judging by the first six episodes, this round is just as addicting as the first, the ensemble rising to the occasion of topping their first outting.
  17. The season's best new drama introduces a smart ensemble and immerses us in a tangle of conflicting viewpoints. The storytelling device, which occasionally backtracks in time, isn't distracting or forced. [29 Sept 2002, p.F-02]
    • Denver Post
  18. The series returns for season 2 on July 13 on Showtime, still excelling thanks to a confluence of terrific casting, great performances and smart storytelling about America in the repressed 1950s.
  19. These four transporting hours tell a touching, funny, heartbreaking story that underscores how complex life is, how fragile human interactions are.
  20. The season's best new comedy - we're talking laugh-out-loud funny. [2 Nov 2003, p.F-14]
    • Denver Post
  21. Suffice it to say creator Matthew Weiner unspools enough story to keep fans hooked, immediately satisfying some curiosities and creating others.
  22. No spoilers here, but there's a twist at the end of tonight's hour of Friday Night Lights that will reverberate through the season. This is cause for concern: The addition of a sustained mystery, not to mention the sight of teens jumping through windows to meet sex partners, could render Friday Night Lights more like every other show. Still, if it makes the story more accessible for those who crave a more literal narrative without altering the basic nature of the series, I'm for it. [5 Oct 2007, p.F-02]
    • Denver Post
  23. As the new season begins, this series continues to be among the best of the extraordinary number of great TV dramas vying for attention.
  24. The entire 14-hour, seven-night experience of Burns' latest opus is an engaging and at times surprising marathon.
  25. Benedict Cumberbatch is alive and well and in fine form.... Purists may find the fancy graphics distracting but creators Steven Moffat and Mark Gatiss use the high-tech touches sparingly.
  26. Part of what makes his series hilarious is the riotous pace and innovative comedic rhythms that sneak up on viewers. This distinctive style is as different from TV's old "Laverne & Shirley" model as third-wave ska is from Perry Como. [7 Nov 2004, p.F-15]
    • Denver Post
  27. Long before Sept. 11, the standout of the fall TV season was an ambitious thriller about a counter-terrorist. ... It's even more captivating now that terrorist threats are a daily fact of life. [4 Nov 2001]
    • Denver Post
  28. Innovative camera work and occasional sound effects throughout add distinctive elements to the series. [9 Jan 2000]
    • Denver Post
  29. Mad Men remains a brilliant, perfectly designed and visually exciting series--one of the very best the medium has to offer--whether you take it at face value or find the experience of watching the TV series enriched by tracing the modern echoes.
  30. Like the best TV shows, Ed has a profound point beneath its silliness. It seems it's always possible to return to Stuckeyville, the hometown we carry around inside, and see new possibilities. If we let go and embrace a magical dramedy that dares to dream, we may feel somehow ennobled. [5 Oct 2000, p.E-03]
    • Denver Post
  31. Dunham succeeds in making viewers uncomfortable while proferring a new (sharp, slightly bitter) flavor of introspective female comedy.
  32. While it's not fun entertainment (lacking the tragicomic notes of, say, "The Sopranos"), it is an amazing dramatic entry. It's only January, and only four episodes were available for review, but True Detective sets the bar for 2014's TV newcomers.
  33. Remarkable on many levels - as an interpretation of history, spotlighting what many consider to be the defining event of the 20th century, and as a tribute to heroism. Emotional and starkly realistic, it's not an easy 10 hours of television...The film also is notable as a collection of superb performances and, pragmatically, as an unimaginably expensive television production: $ 120 million. [6 Sept 2001, p.F-03]
    • Denver Post
  34. The engrossing, beautifully cast and well acted Masters of Sex is at once the tale of an odd couple and the story of a culture coming of age.
  35. This reprise won’t eclipse memories of the film, but it shouldn’t be automatically discounted. It’s a longer, slower study, suited to a different medium and hitting the same gruesome and all-too-human notes.
  36. What Nashville on ABC and "Arrow" on the CW have in common, is appealing characters in well-plotted stories.
  37. Judging by the first five hours of the second season, it successfully broadens the storylines of several key characters. The cast is first-rate; only Elizabeth McGovern? occasionally rings a false.
  38. As was the case with the controversial "In Treatment," those with no patience for self-analysis or a psychologically minded view of relationships may find The Affair slow going. But the mystery element should keep even impatient viewers guessing.
  39. The best comedy you're not watching.... Laurie Metcalf ("Roseanne"), Alex Borstein ("Family Guy") and Niecy Nash ("Reno 911") simply kill it as an ensemble, doing justice to the sharp writing of Mark V. Olsen and Will Scheffer.
  40. Prepare for top-notch dramatic writing, exceptional camera work and complex characters. [27 Oct 1996]
    • Denver Post
  41. The new season contains more laugh-out-loud funny moments, the characters are well defined and the male characters get more prominence.
  42. Assuming you aren't a programmer and don't plan to invent the next killer app, you may at first find HBO's Silicon Valley more pathetic than amusing.... By the end of the second episode, however, the personalities take off, the humor sharpens and there's no need to reboot.
  43. Producer Terence Wrong once again delivers fast-paced, narration-free, riveting footage, thanks to video crews who spent four months, unescorted and unhindered, with hospital personnel and patients at crisis points in their lives.
  44. This is put-your-feet-up, pour-a-brandy television, a tasty import that's good company for a culture undergoing its own sometimes dizzying shifts.
  45. The camera is discreet, cutting away at the very end, giving privacy when taste requires. The families involved are brave in ways not required of ordinary "reality TV" subjects. Even when they appear to be speaking for the camera, the situations are not manipulated. The impact is quite powerful.
  46. A superbly acted and exquisitely rendered gem.
  47. It would be naughty to call it dry. But the lack of personalities leaves the viewer groping for an angle. The overwhelming nature of the event begins to feel overwhelming on the couch, too.
  48. Moody, dark yet at times poetic, this is TV made in the indie-film style, without pretense. Adult, premium-cable caliber without the visual excess.
  49. A medically sound, educational effort.
  50. This is not just a fun escape, it’s a clever puzzle.
  51. The show is fun to watch, but only because Maslany delivers such diverse and precisely defined characters worth watching.
  52. The film glosses over the turbulent aspects of Brown's personal life (domestic-abuse charges and an arrest record are mentioned in passing), and it isn't comprehensive (there's nothing about his four wives, six children, drug addiction or his death in 2006). But the tuneful feature-length film is packed with great vintage clips.
  53. As an immersive experience for viewers who wouldn't think of getting this close to war zones, the Witness films are amazing documents.
  54. The cast, from Katharine McPhee and Megan Hilty to Debra Messing and Angelica Huston, is superb. The subject matter is a carefully blended mix of artistic and accessible.
  55. A beautifully executed 1940s period drama about the men and women involved in the top-secret Manhattan Project is at once transporting and provocative.
  56. Push Girls is a hybrid nonfiction series and, ultimately, an inspiring work.
  57. The second hour gets into the wrangling with studio bosses, casting decisions and constraints to come. The minutia of line producing may be fascinating in theory, but watching hour after hour is a dreary prospect. [2 Dec 2001, p.F-01]
    • Denver Post
  58. Last Tango in Halifax is an absorbing, sometimes surprising tale of late-in-life romance marked by stunning performances.
  59. The evolution of the couple's relationship is as engrossing as the strong-arm spy stuff.
  60. The first three hours leave us thirsting for more.
  61. The goal is not an academic history but a backstage, groupie-eye view. While it's familiar territory for longtime Stones fans, it works.
  62. The documentary, narrated by Benjamin Bratt (son of a Peruvian mother), is rather dry in spite of the rich subject matter. It's particularly slow-going at the start (the pre-Alamo section is a slog), but it picks up steam as the chronology moves toward the modern age with notables contributing first-person accounts.
  63. What a wonderful, funny, poignant origin tale for fans of “Doctor Who” and newcomers alike: An Adventure in Space and Time, airing Nov. 22, features a terrific performance by David Bradley as William Hartnell, the first Doctor. And a pleasing bit at the very end that will make you gasp.
  64. The series sometimes meanders, but only because Grohl's goals are lofty.
  65. Deeply cynical about human beings as well as politics and almost gleeful in its portrayal of limitless ambition, House of Cards is a wonderfully sour take on power and corruption.
  66. Oliver is terrific at mining humor from the most popular topics of the day, that is, the idiocy of the media and politicians. He's funny when he's knocking our intelligence. But he's best when he sticks to a barrage of short bits, enhanced with clips or photographs, as in his first week's efforts.
  67. There seems to have been a conscious decision to add a dose of not just violence but horrific suspense and shocking violence. The first hour in particular feels like a disappointing departure. The character remains the same, even if he encounters accentuated gore and mental illness in the criminals. He even grows a bit.
  68. This ambitious undertaking sticks to over-arching themes through the chronology.
  69. The second season looks to be equally incisive [as the first]. With heart.
  70. You may have read the transcripts over the years, but to hear the dialog, now on the eve of the 40th anniversary of his Aug. 9, 1974 resignation, is newly eye-opening.
  71. Frankly, the acting merits more accolades than the storylines so far.
  72. Overall, The Knick is a sublimely addictive ride for which viewers will want to scrub up.
  73. A spoofy, sarcastic and hilarious exercise in adult animation.
  74. Laurie is a wonder. His drawn face, scraggly beard, hollowed eyes and gaunt body add an offbeat distinction to his dignified performance. His is a sinister quirkiness. [15 Nov 2004, p.F-01]
    • Denver Post
  75. The first four episodes supplied to critics are engaging, but especially in the aftermath of his passing, the shadow of James Gandolfini is, sadly, everywhere.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Maximum Bob evokes a little of that quirky show ("Northern Exposure"), with a talented ensemble cast, rich characters, and a script that doesn't write down to viewers. [4 Aug 1998, p.E-01]
    • Denver Post
  76. It is exploring new turf in terms of a relationship drama with a bold narrative premise, and vaguely spiritual aspirations.
  77. While uneven and not as immediately seductive as David Chase's 'The Sopranos,' Ball's Six Feet Under is a daring exploration on a theme, funny to creepy to plain weird. [3 June 2001, p.E-01]
    • Denver Post
  78. This series won’t change the world, or even the world of TV comedy, but it is an intriguing diversion.
  79. Problematic. ... The captivating McDermott as a defense attorney needs tougher characters to bump up against if he is to struggle meaningfully with his inner self. [2 Mar 1997]
    • Denver Post
  80. Beneath the craziness and violence are some great character studies, meditations on the nature of humanity, clever social commentary, fun flashbacks to vampire lives in past centuries and, as always, cable-ready hard bodies.
  81. Whedon’s trademark humor in the midst of action-adventure (per “Buffy the Vampire Slayer”) saves the day as often as the very human, yet very gifted heroes. That protects the fantastical from becoming ridiculous.
  82. His name is above the title and, depending how you feel about James Spader, NBC’s The Blacklist may become your favorite fall show.
  83. The series has some work to do to extricate its characters from the hole it dug in season 3.
  84. [Elf: Buddy's Musical Christmas is] clever enough for adults, sweet enough for young kids and musically inventive enough to please the worst Scrooge.
  85. Conflicts and tortured characters abound. Unfortunately, the drama goes somewhat soggy when the camera leaves the tight confines of the submarine and the complex plotlines twist into knots.
  86. If you can get past the showy physicality, there's real meat here...Unfortunately, the series is frequently its own worst enemy...Every so often, (it feels like every few scenes), the visuals overwhelm the content, and it's clear the producers are intent on using every bit of license that cable networks allow. Story is overwhelmed by effects. It all becomes "deeply superficial," without the ironic twist. [1 Sept 2006, p.F-01]
    • Denver Post
  87. Tremendous footage of mountain treks and river running make the spectacle compelling while the sometimes clunky dialogue gets the message across.
  88. Bunheads hasn't quite found its footing, but shows great promise thanks more to the cast and crew than to the initial hour.
  89. Will delight those who know a bit about the star-making machinery. It will tickle sports fans and entertain anyone in search of a decent adult comedy. [7 Aug 1996, p.G01]
    • Denver Post
  90. While Moore's performance is riveting, the most insightful aspects of the tale are the insider reactions.
  91. Chronicling Cathy's journey, executive producers Darlene Hunt and Jenny Bicks (a cancer survivor) have so far taken her from denial to rage to bargaining and depression. Onward to acceptance, and to a satisfying conclusion.
  92. Purists will miss the trappings of 221B Baker Street. But Elementary is appealing on several counts. Count No. 1 is Miller.
  93. HBO tackles some familiar territory--beauty and the perils of aging, crowsfeet to sagging cheeks--but treats the subject from several new angles thanks to the candor of the older, wiser, still stunning former models.
  94. What "Nashville" on ABC and Arrow on the CW have in common, is appealing characters in well-plotted stories.
  95. The direction by Susanna White is subtle, except for a too-frequent visual pun of kaleidoscopic, prism-like refractions to help us see that the world at the moment of Parade’s End is splintering into pieces. Cumberbatch pulls off the stoic-to-shell-shocked expressions of Tietjens, Hall is masterful in a demanding role and Clemens is suited to playing the fresh young thing.
  96. G&O feels less serious of intent, less urban or urbane than “Broad City.” But fun.
  97. The first film is well constructed to be unnerving; the second offers the sight of "Grey's" Dr. Yang toting a revolver. Both make for creepy-rich summer viewing.
  98. After a very slow start, Outlander, from the book series by Diana Gabaldon, is a bodice-ripper with a sprinkling of science fiction, a fantasy drama with a bit of action-adventure.
  99. Flockhart... is a compelling presence, and the tone of the writing is both fun and thoughtful. [7 Sep 1997]
    • Denver Post

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