Denver Post's Scores

  • TV
For 181 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 66% higher than the average critic
  • 1% same as the average critic
  • 33% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 7.5 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average TV Show review score: 72
Highest review score: 100 Borgen: Season 1
Lowest review score: 0 Rob: Season 1
Score distribution:
  1. Mixed: 0 out of 136
  2. Negative: 0 out of 136
136 tv reviews
  1. Judging by the first five hours of the second season, it successfully broadens the storylines of several key characters. The cast is first-rate; only Elizabeth McGovern? occasionally rings a false.
  2. The new season contains more laugh-out-loud funny moments, the characters are well defined and the male characters get more prominence.
  3. Assuming you aren't a programmer and don't plan to invent the next killer app, you may at first find HBO's Silicon Valley more pathetic than amusing.... By the end of the second episode, however, the personalities take off, the humor sharpens and there's no need to reboot.
  4. This is put-your-feet-up, pour-a-brandy television, a tasty import that's good company for a culture undergoing its own sometimes dizzying shifts.
  5. The camera is discreet, cutting away at the very end, giving privacy when taste requires. The families involved are brave in ways not required of ordinary "reality TV" subjects. Even when they appear to be speaking for the camera, the situations are not manipulated. The impact is quite powerful.
  6. Producer Terence Wrong once again delivers fast-paced, narration-free, riveting footage, thanks to video crews who spent four months, unescorted and unhindered, with hospital personnel and patients at crisis points in their lives.
  7. It would be naughty to call it dry. But the lack of personalities leaves the viewer groping for an angle. The overwhelming nature of the event begins to feel overwhelming on the couch, too.
  8. A superbly acted and exquisitely rendered gem.
  9. A medically sound, educational effort.
  10. Moody, dark yet at times poetic, this is TV made in the indie-film style, without pretense. Adult, premium-cable caliber without the visual excess.
  11. The show is fun to watch, but only because Maslany delivers such diverse and precisely defined characters worth watching.
  12. This is not just a fun escape, it’s a clever puzzle.
  13. As an immersive experience for viewers who wouldn't think of getting this close to war zones, the Witness films are amazing documents.
  14. The cast, from Katharine McPhee and Megan Hilty to Debra Messing and Angelica Huston, is superb. The subject matter is a carefully blended mix of artistic and accessible.
  15. Push Girls is a hybrid nonfiction series and, ultimately, an inspiring work.
  16. Last Tango in Halifax is an absorbing, sometimes surprising tale of late-in-life romance marked by stunning performances.
  17. The evolution of the couple's relationship is as engrossing as the strong-arm spy stuff.
  18. The first three hours leave us thirsting for more.
  19. The documentary, narrated by Benjamin Bratt (son of a Peruvian mother), is rather dry in spite of the rich subject matter. It's particularly slow-going at the start (the pre-Alamo section is a slog), but it picks up steam as the chronology moves toward the modern age with notables contributing first-person accounts.
  20. What a wonderful, funny, poignant origin tale for fans of “Doctor Who” and newcomers alike: An Adventure in Space and Time, airing Nov. 22, features a terrific performance by David Bradley as William Hartnell, the first Doctor. And a pleasing bit at the very end that will make you gasp.
  21. The goal is not an academic history but a backstage, groupie-eye view. While it's familiar territory for longtime Stones fans, it works.
  22. This ambitious undertaking sticks to over-arching themes through the chronology.
  23. There seems to have been a conscious decision to add a dose of not just violence but horrific suspense and shocking violence. The first hour in particular feels like a disappointing departure. The character remains the same, even if he encounters accentuated gore and mental illness in the criminals. He even grows a bit.
  24. Deeply cynical about human beings as well as politics and almost gleeful in its portrayal of limitless ambition, House of Cards is a wonderfully sour take on power and corruption.
  25. The second season looks to be equally incisive [as the first]. With heart.
  26. Frankly, the acting merits more accolades than the storylines so far.
  27. A spoofy, sarcastic and hilarious exercise in adult animation.
  28. Laurie is a wonder. His drawn face, scraggly beard, hollowed eyes and gaunt body add an offbeat distinction to his dignified performance. His is a sinister quirkiness. [15 Nov 2004, p.F-01]
  29. The first four episodes supplied to critics are engaging, but especially in the aftermath of his passing, the shadow of James Gandolfini is, sadly, everywhere.
  30. It is exploring new turf in terms of a relationship drama with a bold narrative premise, and vaguely spiritual aspirations.