Denver Post's Scores

  • TV
For 296 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 64% higher than the average critic
  • 1% same as the average critic
  • 35% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 6.5 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average TV Show review score: 71
Highest review score: 100 The Office (UK): Season 3
Lowest review score: 0 Rob: Season 1
Score distribution:
  1. Mixed: 0 out of 218
  2. Negative: 0 out of 218
218 tv reviews
  1. Season 2 of Manhattan gets off to a slow start and may require catch-up work. But the high-minded story about the creators of the atom bomb soon picks up the pace.
  2. This is not just a fun escape, it’s a clever puzzle.
  3. The show is fun to watch, but only because Maslany delivers such diverse and precisely defined characters worth watching.
  4. The film glosses over the turbulent aspects of Brown's personal life (domestic-abuse charges and an arrest record are mentioned in passing), and it isn't comprehensive (there's nothing about his four wives, six children, drug addiction or his death in 2006). But the tuneful feature-length film is packed with great vintage clips.
  5. As an immersive experience for viewers who wouldn't think of getting this close to war zones, the Witness films are amazing documents.
  6. The cast, from Katharine McPhee and Megan Hilty to Debra Messing and Angelica Huston, is superb. The subject matter is a carefully blended mix of artistic and accessible.
  7. Togetherness is very L.A., and very of the moment. For some it may feel too true.
  8. It's a beautiful interview piece with archival photographs and clips that will inform any viewer's appreciation of the performing arts.
  9. A beautifully executed 1940s period drama about the men and women involved in the top-secret Manhattan Project is at once transporting and provocative.
  10. Although it's less than exciting and not at all a comic respite, Saul has me along for the ride.
  11. Push Girls is a hybrid nonfiction series and, ultimately, an inspiring work.
  12. An engaging work of strong storytelling.
  13. The second hour gets into the wrangling with studio bosses, casting decisions and constraints to come. The minutia of line producing may be fascinating in theory, but watching hour after hour is a dreary prospect. [2 Dec 2001, p.F-01]
    • Denver Post
  14. Last Tango in Halifax is an absorbing, sometimes surprising tale of late-in-life romance marked by stunning performances.
  15. The film brings the crude, demanding LBJ into focus along with the insecure, desperately needy man in one indelible performance. It's a beautifully rounded portrait of a complicated man at a crucial point in history, pushing for an important victory while tiptoeing toward the future that was Vietnam.
  16. The evolution of the couple's relationship is as engrossing as the strong-arm spy stuff.
  17. Netflix has previously scored with "Orange is the New Black" and "House of Cards," but this is the first true comedy it has picked up and it looks to be a winner. Unbreakable? Unassailable.
  18. The hour, directed by Chris Rock, further cements her status as an all-medium power player. By turns coy, insecure, dramatic and challenging, Schumer has the flexibility to make her conversation both intimate and grandstanding.
  19. The first three hours leave us thirsting for more.
  20. Graphic cruelty, not to mention violence, makes for difficult viewing in this lavishly produced miniseries. But it’s worthwhile, especially as director Clement Virgo has opened a new window on the experience of blacks in Canada.
  21. The goal is not an academic history but a backstage, groupie-eye view. While it's familiar territory for longtime Stones fans, it works.
  22. The documentary, narrated by Benjamin Bratt (son of a Peruvian mother), is rather dry in spite of the rich subject matter. It's particularly slow-going at the start (the pre-Alamo section is a slog), but it picks up steam as the chronology moves toward the modern age with notables contributing first-person accounts.
  23. What a wonderful, funny, poignant origin tale for fans of “Doctor Who” and newcomers alike: An Adventure in Space and Time, airing Nov. 22, features a terrific performance by David Bradley as William Hartnell, the first Doctor. And a pleasing bit at the very end that will make you gasp.
  24. Seeso’s first original scripted comedy, written and directed by BAFTA-nominated Will Sharpe, is a head-scratcher. It does have Olivia Colman going for it.
  25. [Empire is] still addicting and with a number of hot guest stars.
  26. The series sometimes meanders, but only because Grohl's goals are lofty.
  27. The CIA office politics are getting old, but the topical references remain gripping.
  28. Deeply cynical about human beings as well as politics and almost gleeful in its portrayal of limitless ambition, House of Cards is a wonderfully sour take on power and corruption.
  29. Oliver is terrific at mining humor from the most popular topics of the day, that is, the idiocy of the media and politicians. He's funny when he's knocking our intelligence. But he's best when he sticks to a barrage of short bits, enhanced with clips or photographs, as in his first week's efforts.
  30. There seems to have been a conscious decision to add a dose of not just violence but horrific suspense and shocking violence. The first hour in particular feels like a disappointing departure. The character remains the same, even if he encounters accentuated gore and mental illness in the criminals. He even grows a bit.

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