Edge Magazine's Scores

  • Games
For 2,628 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 15% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 82% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 8.9 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Game review score: 64
Highest review score: 100 LittleBigPlanet
Lowest review score: 10 FlatOut 3: Chaos & Destruction
Score distribution:
2,628 game reviews
    • 92 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    The present console cycle is expected to last nearly a decade, and there will inevitably be developers advocating the need for more sophisticated tools. But just like Machu Picchu, the Pyramids and every other engineering marvel of antiquity, Uncharted 3 will stand as a reminder to future generations of gamers that enough problem-solving imagination can turn any old trowel into a magic wand.
    • 92 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    By polishing away blemishes, Rock Band 2 carefully improves on its predecessor. Those expecting the likes of music-making functionality perhaps aren’t quite on Rock Band’s wavelength, which is about performance, not creativity. [Dec 2008, p.85]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 75 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Games are so rarely funny by design, but Jazzpunk is much more than a funny videogame. It’s a comedy, and one that wouldn’t be possible – or anywhere near as powerful – in any other medium.
    • 96 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Ultimately, no one will disagree that Uncharted 2 is one hell of a ride, and the best PS3 action game to date.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    An emphatic, feature-packed and sometimes stunning final act.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    TxK
    This is twitch gaming at its finest, with beautifully tuned thumbstick controls and a pulsing rave soundtrack that only seems to focus the mind more sharply.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    PGR3 hasn’t moved from its niche, not at all – at its core, it’s still pure PGR, a savvy and standalone mixture of real form and hyper-real function – but it’s been transformed into a wondrous and rewarding beauty spot. [Christmas 2005, p.88]
    • 90 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    It may be pulled together from no more than shards of light, but few games manage to be both a science and an art. [Oct 2008, p.99]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 90 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    It's unusual to find a game of this sort deal with losing, which is obviously the majority experience, with such care – the packaging of Barry's mad dash turns it into an endlessly rewarding marathon, rather than a series of disconnected sprints.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Gauge, then, is throwaway, minimalist, score-chasing brilliance, a game that's pulled together from the smallest selection of pieces, but that also feels bold and new and intensely imaginative.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Despite its hectic invention, then, Velocity retains a rare kind of focus. Vita owners finally have something tart to see them through the drought, and the Minis just got a new standard bearer.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    This is a brave and truly original work, and if this is what happens when Simogo explores its dark side, it should do so more often.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    It may not re-invent the wheel, but MotoGP2 is a shiny new alloy among racing games, and builds upon the series' excellent reputation. And that should be enough to stir up Xbox live all over again. [June 2003, p.100]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 85 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Combat is thrilling – each weapon packing a solid, vicious blast; movement suggesting heft and momentum. [Dec 2008, p.80]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 81 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Brutal and rather short, VVVVVV's also devious and darkly funny. It's a pedantic classic, and a game for watch-makers as much as speed-runners.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    It's a masterfully constructed piece of tabletop theatre, whose spell is only broken once, as we were delayed for over an hour by some key loot that took over a dozen attempts to drop. Many won't make it past this preposterous roadblock, but those who persevere to the bitter end will be heartily glad they did.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Combat is thrilling – each weapon packing a solid, vicious blast; movement suggesting heft and momentum. [Dec 2008, p.80]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 78 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Dead Rising 3 is a sandbox in the purest sense, one that urges you to experiment with its innumerable toys at your leisure. The result is an open world that, in spite of its reanimated inhabitants, feels more alive than most.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    It’s a strange situation for the series to truly hit its stride in a game that’s both beginning and conclusion, and you can’t help but wish Dante would never grow up, that there could have been more stories of his teenage roundhouse kicks. [Apr 2005, p.90]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 74 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Despite its unreserved nature, and being about as tightly tethered to reality as the Burnout series, Ridge Racer 6 hasn’t floated away from its roots. It’s content to sink into its well-established furrow of soaring slides and skids, and it still feels crisply satisfying with it. [Jan 2005, p.82]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 78 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The presentation is as characterful as you would expect from London Studio, it's welcoming to newcomers to the EyeToy, or even to gaming in general, and the navigation system has been much improved, responding snappily to your commands.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Bright, colourful and mostly dismissive of current trends, it’s clear The Behemoth wants to delight players with every moment of its latest performance. That it succeeds in only most of those moments is still a remarkable achievement.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Showdown is not just a party game, nor is it the limp refurb you might expect this late in a console life cycle. It feels like something as crucial to Codemasters Racing as any of its predecessors – less a spin-off than a deliberate change of tack.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Whatever the oddities and missed opportunities of its singleplayer mode, Bad Company 2 delivers a fulsome online game that continues to hone a winning formula. [Apr 2010, p.90]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 84 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    So while the campaign's filled with visual pleasures and colourful tricks, it's in the stark white spaces of the editor that Sound Shapes really dazzles, stepping away from the museum of hallucinations that all rhythm action games offer and threatening, at times, to become a genuine musical instrument in its own right.
    • 89 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The game's parts are by turns novel and enjoyable, but when played in longer bursts feel repetitive. Brotherhood is Assassin's Creed II 2, its new mechanics feeling more like extensions of an existing form than innovations. It's a greatest hits disc, then, a weighty, good-value deal that plays the series' best bits – but there's the constant danger that you've heard them before.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    This is a delightfully risky experiment, and the end result is pure alchemy: the blending of two fiercely traditional genres into something both unique and entirely natural. [Apr 2009, p.125]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 89 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    It would be easy to take The Minish Cap for granted, left as it is with little to do but shuffle and tinker with its immaculate heritage. That, however, would be a grave mistake... Maybe you can't go wrong with the Zelda template, but they haven't always gone this right. [Christmas 2004, p.91]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 80 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    With a defined beginning, four distinct seasonal environments and an affecting, surprising conclusion, there's no question that Proteus is a game. But if there's one concern, it's whether this is an island that's worth revisiting once you've seen all it has to offer. In a way, its lack of progression – the absence of skill trees, difficulty levels and save points – works in its favour; you won't dive back in to mop up the last few achievements, or to climb leaderboards, but simply because you want to play Proteus.
    • 93 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    It's a third and final chapter, then, with all that implies. It's off-putting to new players, too busy tying up loose ends to dangle any threads of its own, and fails to stand up as its own game in the same manner as its predecessors. But it's also a spectacular, powerfully imagined and dramatically involving final act to one of gaming's richest sci-fi sagas.