Edge Magazine's Scores

  • Games
For 2,867 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 15% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 82% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 8.7 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Game review score: 65
Highest review score: 100 The Orange Box
Lowest review score: 10 FlatOut 3: Chaos & Destruction
Score distribution:
2867 game reviews
    • 82 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Sokobond introduces complexity via level furniture that breaks bonds or lets you adjust the position of bonded atoms, but even the basic chambers provide ingenious challenges. Forget chemistry: it takes alchemy to produce a puzzle game as refined and smart as this.
    • 89 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Valve has taken something unscripted and dynamic, and seeded it with the right amount of narrative flavour, pacing and spectacle. [Christmas 2008, p.82]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 86 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    It uses preexisting flaws as the foundations for something that is better in just about every single way: bigger, more coherent and, best of all, immeasurably more generous. With that comes, appropriately, a puzzle for Bungie to solve. How do you continue to build on a game that has so few chinks in its lustrous, gleaming exotic armour? [Dec 2015, p.106]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 87 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    It arrives fully formed, with a challenge and aesthetic that's beautifully intertwined and finely crafted. Joyous.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Mario Kart 8 is yet another overwhelmingly powerful argument in favour of the company’s idiosyncratic approach to design.
    • 90 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    A game that's more than the sum of its parts. [Dec 2009, p.98]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 95 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    GTAIV’s modern weapons spit bullets like angry hornets until a health circle depletes; here, lives end in uncompromising fashion. For the western aficionado, it is viciously accurate; for the fan of wanton sandbox carnage, it is comically frank.
    • 93 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Super Smash Bros is a series that has often been unfairly derided as button-mashing, largely thanks to its surface sheen of cutesy characters, but it has one of the most enduringly innovative and deep systems of any fighter. [Apr 2008, p.84]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 89 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    The freedom of movement requires a new level of spatial imagination. Before Prince of Persia, platform games were like playing Tetris with only the blocks and bars. [Christmas 2003, p.100]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 89 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    If L4D2 is sometimes over-complicated by its glut of small innovations, then it also substantially rewards the player with its few large ideas: confusion gives way to depth and dynamism, grander thrills and starker dramas. We’re still interested in the fate of the original game’s heroes, but this sequel affirms that the way ahead is due south.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    While it's unlikely to win as many hearts as Resident Evil 4 did, it's an equally important and remarkable entry in the series' tumultuous timeline. [March 2017, p.94]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 92 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    A work of progressive genius that hauls its staid genre up by the bootstraps and takes its place alongside the WOWs and Oblivions of this world. It's altogether too good to be true. [Christmas 2006, p.74]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 85 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    An ambitious and largely successful attempt to meld the accuracy of traditional firstperson battling with the extra spatial agility and awareness afforded by thirdperson movement. It does feel slightly overdone, but not to the point of obscuring its offering of intensity and flighty action. [May 2005, p.90]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 88 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Despite a handful of minor issues, then, and occasionally patchy framerates in particularly busy areas, Dishonored 2 is consistently remarkable. [Jan 2017, p.102]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 89 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Charting a course through Earth's imminent destruction is as unashamedly difficult as it was in 1994's X-COM. It's possible, through bad planning and bad management, to doom the planet early on, making the game feel unfair. Get it right, however – survive the stresses of management, and the strains of aliens – and you'll feel like world's greatest hero.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Like the very best narratives, Thirty Flights Of Loving relies on economy more than excess, and it races you breathlessly to its conclusion rather than herding you through an awkward gauntlet of false choices and bottlenecks.
    • 89 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Borderlands 2 might not develop extensively on its forebear, but it has even greater power to hold you for hours on end, deftly weaving RPG stat development with skill-based play. It's enough to make every decision you make meaningful and fun, and lend the realisation that Gearbox knows more about the fundamentals of the shooter than almost any other developer.
    • 93 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    It’s a game designed to exhaust the world’s supply of adjectives. It’s a world littered with riches - tiny details sewn into a vast, varied and utterly spectacular canvas. [Sept 2005, p.90]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 89 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    The core Titanfall moveset is a joy, and it has been thoughtfully expanded with a delightful grappling hook. [Jan 2017, p.112]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 90 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Playdead's debut title is a rare thing – a wholly realised place as well as a successfully realised game, and both Limbo and the Limbo inside it are one-of-a-kind places to be stuck in.
    • 92 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Awakening offers an excellent game of strategy, but it’s the relationship system that makes it.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Your achievements in the game stem from legitimate advancements in your understanding of physics. [July 2015, p.102]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 85 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Far Cry 3 asked for the definition of insanity, and its sequel answers it. [Jan 2014, p.100]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 87 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    A virtuoso feat of creativity. [July 2015, p.110]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 66 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    A quiet game within which burns a fierce revolutionary spirit. [July 2015, p.114]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 94 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    The only real criticism that can be levelled at Knights of the Old Republic is that, particularly towards the end of the game, it all feels fairly easy, but then this is a game that's designed to be experienced rather than conquered, and lightsaber wielding Jedi aren't supposed to find things difficult. [Oct 2003, p.86]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 90 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    It is an instinctive, ingenious joy to play for every minute, and it sets a new gold standard for game interface design on any platform. [Sept 2007, p.86]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 87 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    A vast, almost encyclopaedic look at the united nations of rally, Dirt 3 doesn't feel definitive despite America – it wouldn't feel definitive without it.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    The Last Guardian doesn't just live up to its forebears' legacy, it goes further. Despite the callbacks to Fumito Ueda's previous works, it is a unique creation. Outside of indie experiments, we don't get to say that about modern videogames often enough.
    • Edge Magazine
    • 83 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    SFXT successfully combines the best of the most popular 2D and 3D fighting games in the world, proves Capcom's most newcomer-friendly fighter, and boasts a combat system of bewildering depth. If any company was going to move the genre forward, it seems fitting that it's the one that invented it.

Top Trailers