Edge Magazine's Scores

  • Games
For 2,568 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 15% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 82% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 8.7 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Game review score: 64
Highest review score: 100 Half-Life 2
Lowest review score: 10 FlatOut 3: Chaos & Destruction
Score distribution:
2,568 game reviews
    • 84 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    With such a focus, People Can Fly has made the best game possible: one which is smart enough to make a case for looking dumb. [Apr 2011, p.86]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 84 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    It feels, in other words, an awful lot like classic Street Fighter, and praise doesn’t come much higher than that.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    A perfectly sized, expertly-crafted romp, Pacific gives other download games their marching orders. [Aug 2009, p.97]
    • 83 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    To have been worth the wait for PC gamers it would have needed to considerably improve on the Xbox original. Put simply, it doesn't. [Dec 2003, p.109]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 83 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    It can be a little basic in places, and it isn’t a ‘paradigm shift’ in any sense, but it is proof that games can love their roots and use the quality of being a ‘game’ to give form to their stories – and excel at it. [Feb 2008, p.90]
    • 83 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Stealth games are only as good as the flexibility of their encounters, and in that regard Black Flag is the most generous Assassin’s Creed game to date.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    ODST doesn’t quite take Halo into unfamiliar territory, but it does show how robust and adaptable the core of the game is – and, more importantly, stands on its own two feet as a spin-off that’s better than the vast majority of original games.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    SFXT successfully combines the best of the most popular 2D and 3D fighting games in the world, proves Capcom's most newcomer-friendly fighter, and boasts a combat system of bewildering depth. If any company was going to move the genre forward, it seems fitting that it's the one that invented it.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    For a game with a premise as simple as kill the aliens before they kill you, Ziggurat's stylishly retro visuals, gleeful arcade precision and deeply interlocking mechanics trigger a chain reaction that kicks off like some interstellar combustion. Not the sound of a world ending. But the sort of bang that would make Richard Dawkins lean back, fold his arms and grin like a chimp.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    While certainly being Treasure's most fragmented game, there’s a sense that the lack of narrative, character and even proper framework makes this its most raw, pure and delightful. [June 2008, p.95]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 83 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    This is a remarkably assured game for such a young studio, the work of a small team that knows exactly what it wants to do and executes it almost without error.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Complex but accessible, inventive yet familiar, a game that has gripped browser windows is every bit as troublingly addictive in the palm of your hand.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Sokobond introduces complexity via level furniture that breaks bonds or lets you adjust the position of bonded atoms, but even the basic chambers provide ingenious challenges. Forget chemistry: it takes alchemy to produce a puzzle game as refined and smart as this.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    The action creeps up slowly, starting out like a gorgeous-looking but fairly standard shoot 'em up. However, by the middle of level two, it's pummelling you with a relentless parade of conceptual set pieces so audacious and inventive you'll laugh with delight as you gape in horror. [Sept 2004, p.94]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 82 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    A fairytale comeback. Extravagance was one of the signatures of the graphic adventure: extravagance to bring them in, and a cracking story well told to keep them.Both tenets of the Broken Sword series remain intact here, and that's all the devoted fans could have wanted. [Christmas 2003, p.94]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 82 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Its prudence, that veil of simplicity masking a system of astonishing possibility and depth, makes it one of the purest fighting games on the market today.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    It's a dazzling experience, combining carefree spectacle with careful score attack, a game that's as concerned with its looks as the precision of its underlying mathematical systems. [JPN Import; June 2009, p.94]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 82 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Halo exhibits a single-minded focus that the modern FPS, with its choreographed set-pieces and thrilling scripted sequences, largely disregards. This is a game about the arc of a perfectly thrown grenade, a game about tense games of cat-and-mouse with foes as powerful as you, a game about constant improvisation with the tools at your disposal. It's a game that always feels tactical, and a game that – even now – has the capacity to surprise.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Nidhogg is not about lengthy stage lists, improvable online systems, fussy control mapping or AI. Nidhogg is about the purity of two friends on a couch duking it out as Daedelus’s moody dynamic electronica frames acrobatic displays of wits and reflexes. In that sense, it has no equal.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Outlast’s combination of stealth, platforming and horror is exceptional, the benefits of the diverse experience of its highly talented development team always in plain sight.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    From Dust's not magnificent because of its breezy intricacy and rugged grasp of geology. It's magnificent because it's designed with a playful deity in mind. It's built for a god who knows that to succeed is human, 
but to err – and to be creatively led astray time after time – is truly divine.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    To give in to its spell, you just need to let go. [Christmas 2014, p.123]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 80 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    As an accessible, powerful game-building tool, LBP 3 is remarkable, and offers more scope than we dared to expect. [Christmas 2014, p.108]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 78 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Crucially, Autosport’s career structure and nuanced vehicle handling combine to alleviate any potential frustration for players weaned on effortless victories.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Codemasters had a hard act to follow in Grid, but with this sequel it’s delivered a dazzling package that can proudly take its place among the best racing games of this generation. It not only smooths off nearly all of the awkward edges that have plagued the studio’s ongoing attempts to cohere its racing games with driver-focused storylines, but it does so with enough pomp and spectacle to send current-generation hardware off with a memorable bang.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    A fairytale comeback. Extravagance was one of the signatures of the graphic adventure: extravagance to bring them in, and a cracking story well told to keep them. Both tenets of the Broken Sword series remain intact here, and that's all the devoted fans could have wanted. [Christmas 2003, p.94]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 75 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Simply for the harrowing elegance of this risk-reward proposition, Impossible Road’s lone developer Kevin Ng deserves to have his pockets paved with gold.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    If it’s a demo, Ground Zeroes is the best demo ever; if it’s a prologue, it sets up the story so well you’ll spend the next year thirsting for revenge; and if it’s a tutorial, the systems it teaches are so intriguing that the prospect of spending an entire game with them is irresistible. Ground Zeroes is a resounding success in every respect bar its price tag, but value is relative. Fourteen hours in, we’re still learning.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Games are so rarely funny by design, but Jazzpunk is much more than a funny videogame. It’s a comedy, and one that wouldn’t be possible – or anywhere near as powerful – in any other medium.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    This is far, far more than a nostalgic return to form - instead, it's a game so adept at exploiting its own heritage that it can integrate thorough modernity into its design without denting its retro appeal in the slightest. [Sept 2006, p.78]
    • Edge Magazine