Edge Magazine's Scores

  • Games
For 2,611 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 15% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 82% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 9 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Game review score: 64
Highest review score: 100 Bayonetta 2
Lowest review score: 10 FlatOut 3: Chaos & Destruction
Score distribution:
2,611 game reviews
    • 95 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    Naughty Dog has delivered the most riveting, emotionally resonant story-driven epic of this console generation. At times it’s easy to feel like big-budget development has too much on the line to allow stubbornly artful ideas to flourish, but then a game like The Last Of Us emerges through the crumbled blacktop like a climbing vine, green as a burnished emerald.
    • 97 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    No one makes worlds like Rockstar, but at last it has produced one without compromise. Everything works. It has mechanics good enough to anchor games of their own, and a story that is not only what GTA has always wanted to tell but also fits the way people have always played it. It’s a remarkable achievement, a peerless marriage of world design, storytelling and mechanics that pushes these ageing consoles to the limit and makes it all look easy.
    • 98 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    Yes, there's still the freedom to cause havoc, and inevitably you do; the difference is that you’re no longer impelled to toy with GTA IV's world in quite the same sadistic way - you live in it. [June 2008, p.82]
    • 93 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    It all adds up to what is easily the best and most progressive rhythm-action game ever made, if that label even applies anymore. [Christmas 2010, p.76]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 91 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    Sega's loss is Nintendo's gain: Bayonetta, twirling away from a gigantic demon's maw and smacking the highest choir of angels on the nose, has just given Wii U its first true classic. [Nov 2014, p.100]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 96 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    As a whole it is almost overwhelming in its depth, irresistible in value and certainly, unreservedly, brilliant. [Dec 2007, p.82]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 90 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    A beautiful and graceful fighting game that lets imagination loose, and winks before slapping Dante, Kratos and every other hero back to the drawing board. [Christmas 2009, p.90]
    • 95 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    It’s a multiplayer riot, a visual landmark, a feat of engineering, and one of the most charming games ever made. But even those accolades are dwarfed by its scope, its potential, and the apparent endlessness of them both. [Dec 2008, p.76]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 96 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    Half-Life 2 is a first-person shooter. But in action, storytelling, technical achievement, atmosphere and intensity it has far outdone its peers. Valve just hit the top note no other PC game developer could reach...The excuse that 'it's just a game' won't cut it anymore. [Dec 2004, p.102]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 93 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    How apt that this ultimate tale of hero-making should see Nintendo's hardware become the console it was always meant to be.
    • 94 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    In substance it's nothing new, merely a magnificent, beautiful monster of an FPS sequel. In concept and execution, though, Halo 3 is the future. [Nov 2007, p.80]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 97 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    Since the end of the N64 era, as Nintendo has explored new pastures and methodically tended old ones, it’s been easy to forget the times when every major release from the company felt like this. It’s a bravura piece of design that pulls off stunts no one else has even thought of. [Christmast 2007, p.76]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 96 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    As a whole it is almost overwhelming in its depth, irresistible in value and certainly, unreservedly, brilliant. [Dec 2007, p.82]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 92 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    A dazzling work of dank, abject horror that cements Miyazaki as one of the all-time greats. Sixteen months after PS4's launch, the new generation has finally begun. [May 2015, p.112]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 97 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    This isn't a game that redefines the genre: this is one that rolls it up and locks it away.
    • 98 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    Yes, there's still the freedom to cause havoc, and inevitably you do; the difference is that you're no longer impelled to toy with GTA IV's world in quite the same sadistic way - you live in it. [June 2008, p.82]
    • 83 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    While certainly being Treasure's most fragmented game, there’s a sense that the lack of narrative, character and even proper framework makes this its most raw, pure and delightful. [June 2008, p.95]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 83 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    This is a remarkably assured game for such a young studio, the work of a small team that knows exactly what it wants to do and executes it almost without error.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Even if the DNA of its forebears is barely apparent, such a bold, brilliant transformation certainly involves something a little like magic. [Dec 2009, p.100]
    • 95 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    As with previous GTA games there's lots to criticise, but San Andreas survives, scathed but still walking tall, buoyed by the kind of ambition that sees most games crumble under the weight of it all. It's a multi-faceted, multi-achieving experience, a rough-edged but massively substantial landmark. [Christmas 2004, p.78]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 86 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Every single moment of Four Swords is magically familiar and every single moment is dazzlingly fresh...Whether being experienced in the competitive, co-operative cackle of multiplay, or the captivating atmosphere of singleplayer, the extraordinary virtues of the game itself remain the same. [May 2004, p.96]
    • 90 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    The best platformer on iPhone just got better, and there's still no sign of any meaningful competition. [Sept 2009, p.93]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 93 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    No other beat 'em up developer is quite as willing to experiment with the form in a bid to stave off the moribundity that's gradually subsuming the genre. [Import - June 2003, p.88]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 85 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    It's a puzzle game and a strategy game as much as an action game, then, and like Rockstar's Manhunt, it will sicken you even as it provides its murky thrills.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    It can be a little basic in places, and it isn’t a ‘paradigm shift’ in any sense, but it is proof that games can love their roots and use the quality of being a ‘game’ to give form to their stories – and excel at it. [Feb 2008, p.90]
    • 90 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    The only thing that's hard to adjust, in fact, is the tension in your muscles. GTR 2 is hugely better than its predecessor in exactly the area that matters. [Oct 2006, p.89]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 96 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Zelda virgins might well play The Wind Waker and deem it the best game they've ever encountered. To those of us who already have an idea of what to expect, though, it's 'merely' brilliant. [May 2003, p.88]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 82 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Sokobond introduces complexity via level furniture that breaks bonds or lets you adjust the position of bonded atoms, but even the basic chambers provide ingenious challenges. Forget chemistry: it takes alchemy to produce a puzzle game as refined and smart as this.
    • 89 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Valve has taken something unscripted and dynamic, and seeded it with the right amount of narrative flavour, pacing and spectacle. [Christmas 2008, p.82]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 87 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    It arrives fully formed, with a challenge and aesthetic that's beautifully intertwined and finely crafted. Joyous.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Mario Kart 8 is yet another overwhelmingly powerful argument in favour of the company’s idiosyncratic approach to design.
    • 90 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    A game that's more than the sum of its parts. [Dec 2009, p.98]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 95 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    GTAIV’s modern weapons spit bullets like angry hornets until a health circle depletes; here, lives end in uncompromising fashion. For the western aficionado, it is viciously accurate; for the fan of wanton sandbox carnage, it is comically frank.
    • 93 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Super Smash Bros is a series that has often been unfairly derided as button-mashing, largely thanks to its surface sheen of cutesy characters, but it has one of the most enduringly innovative and deep systems of any fighter. [Apr 2008, p.84]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 89 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    The freedom of movement requires a new level of spatial imagination. Before Prince of Persia, platform games were like playing Tetris with only the blocks and bars. [Christmas 2003, p.100]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 89 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    If L4D2 is sometimes over-complicated by its glut of small innovations, then it also substantially rewards the player with its few large ideas: confusion gives way to depth and dynamism, grander thrills and starker dramas. We’re still interested in the fate of the original game’s heroes, but this sequel affirms that the way ahead is due south.
    • 92 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    A work of progressive genius that hauls its staid genre up by the bootstraps and takes its place alongside the WOWs and Oblivions of this world. It's altogether too good to be true. [Christmas 2006, p.74]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 85 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    An ambitious and largely successful attempt to meld the accuracy of traditional firstperson battling with the extra spatial agility and awareness afforded by thirdperson movement. It does feel slightly overdone, but not to the point of obscuring its offering of intensity and flighty action. [May 2005, p.90]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 89 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Charting a course through Earth's imminent destruction is as unashamedly difficult as it was in 1994's X-COM. It's possible, through bad planning and bad management, to doom the planet early on, making the game feel unfair. Get it right, however – survive the stresses of management, and the strains of aliens – and you'll feel like world's greatest hero.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Like the very best narratives, Thirty Flights Of Loving relies on economy more than excess, and it races you breathlessly to its conclusion rather than herding you through an awkward gauntlet of false choices and bottlenecks.
    • 89 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Borderlands 2 might not develop extensively on its forebear, but it has even greater power to hold you for hours on end, deftly weaving RPG stat development with skill-based play. It's enough to make every decision you make meaningful and fun, and lend the realisation that Gearbox knows more about the fundamentals of the shooter than almost any other developer.
    • 93 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    It’s a game designed to exhaust the world’s supply of adjectives. It’s a world littered with riches - tiny details sewn into a vast, varied and utterly spectacular canvas. [Sept 2005, p.90]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 90 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Playdead's debut title is a rare thing – a wholly realised place as well as a successfully realised game, and both Limbo and the Limbo inside it are one-of-a-kind places to be stuck in.
    • 92 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Awakening offers an excellent game of strategy, but it’s the relationship system that makes it.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Far Cry 3 asked for the definition of insanity, and its sequel answers it. [Jan 2014, p.100]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 94 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    The only real criticism that can be levelled at Knights of the Old Republic is that, particularly towards the end of the game, it all feels fairly easy, but then this is a game that's designed to be experienced rather than conquered, and lightsaber wielding Jedi aren't supposed to find things difficult. [Oct 2003, p.86]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 90 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    It is an instinctive, ingenious joy to play for every minute, and it sets a new gold standard for game interface design on any platform. [Sept 2007, p.86]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 87 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    A vast, almost encyclopaedic look at the united nations of rally, Dirt 3 doesn't feel definitive despite America – it wouldn't feel definitive without it.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    SFXT successfully combines the best of the most popular 2D and 3D fighting games in the world, proves Capcom's most newcomer-friendly fighter, and boasts a combat system of bewildering depth. If any company was going to move the genre forward, it seems fitting that it's the one that invented it.
    • 90 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    From its sluggish, restrictive start, Human Revolution opens into a world of scintillating possibility in which your actions' significance reaches far into the future. And with something like that difficult future approaching fast, Human Revolution achieves a rare accolade: it's not just a great game, but a timely one.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    The game's unflinching depiction of wartime suffering is particularly unsettling in a medium that commonly focuses on pyrotechnics and headshots. [Jan 2014, p.118]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 93 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    The central achievement of Minecraft is a willingness to let the player define the experience; to make them the most interesting element in a world that's already dynamic and fascinating. It's a decision that has made designer Markus Persson a millionaire, and it's ensured that the most important PC game of the past five years is also the most timely.
    • 94 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    So if Arkham Asylum was defined by its limits, Arkham City is a careful, considered exercise in stripping those limits away. Its open city lets players be a different kind of Batman to the stealthy predator of Asylum – this is the Batman of dropped smoke pellets and theatrical getaways, the Batman with an ear to the ground for the strong picking on the weak, and the Batman who floats above the city with a gothic majesty.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    As an accessible, powerful game-building tool, LBP 3 is remarkable, and offers more scope than we dared to expect. [Christmas 2014, p.108]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 91 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Reach is a fine conclusion to Bungie's stewardship of the series, but that's what stops it from being anything more. Halo felt like the future. Reach is merely a brilliantly engineered present.
    • 93 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    This is Mario like you’ve never seen him before, and unlike so many of his next-gen rivals, he nips along at an effortless 60fps. If the true measure of new hardware’s worth is how stark the difference is between it and what came before, then this is the most next-gen game that 2013 has yet produced.
    • 89 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Fez
    The route you pick through Polytron's floating world is nearly impossible to verbalise, while its puzzles resolve themselves in your mind unexpectedly, in clear, wordless chunks. There's really no language to cover many of the things you get up to in Fez. For a videogame in 2012, that may be the ultimate endorsement.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Fight Night has tirelessly rebuilt itself when many expected retirement. Cautious improvements from Round 4 - the removal of the cut-man game and automation of recovery - have been confidently reinforced, while ring physics, ragdolls and cloth dynamics are in a different class to the chaotic Round 3. [Apr 2011, p.103]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 84 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    The micromanagement is on a previously unimagined macro scale and yet is accessible and coherent enough to draw you in, making hours of concentrated playtime pass like minutes. [Dec 2003, p.101]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 76 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    To give in to its spell, you just need to let go. [Christmas 2014, p.123]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 85 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    The fundamentals of the game are intoxicating.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Spelunky digs its way so deeply into your brain and often pops up when you're busy playing something else. You'll flashback when another game's arsenal reminds you of just how powerful Yu's simple toolset is, or when another level designer tries and fails to encourage a different approach and reward convoluted strategies.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Paradise loops its action into an endless rush, the possibilities, for arcade racing and battle enthusiasts alike, increasing with every hour. It’s hard not to see it as the birth of a new era, but in truth it might be the last Burnout you ever need. [Feb 2008, p.86]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 84 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    With such a focus, People Can Fly has made the best game possible: one which is smart enough to make a case for looking dumb. [Apr 2011, p.86]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 82 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Its prudence, that veil of simplicity masking a system of astonishing possibility and depth, makes it one of the purest fighting games on the market today.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    At six to seven hours, Tearaway isn’t the longest game in Vita’s library, but it packs in more joyfully realised ideas than many games manage in three or four times the runtime. It’s a beautiful, brilliant game, but it’s more than that: it’s the first great Vita game.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Like all great puzzle games, you’re beholden to the whims of fortune, forcing you into leaps of faith that often prove frustratingly fatal. But like all great puzzle games, Stickets’ surface simplicity is merely a cover for mechanics of astonishing depth and longevity.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    To have been worth the wait for PC gamers it would have needed to considerably improve on the Xbox original. Put simply, it doesn't. [Dec 2003, p.109]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 90 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    A shrewd and often brilliant game that reaches its destination with most of its goals realised, not discarded and left in the dust like the forced march of its predecessors. [Apr 2011, p.94]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 92 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    It's a potent return to form for Takahashi, then, a glowing comeback for the Japanese RPG, and an injection of creativity for some tired hardware. Xenoblade Chronicles manages to impress, enrich and, best of all, inspire wonder.
    • 91 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Tecmo's refusal to extend any kind of handhold to less dedicated players is simply a failure of design, not a badge of hardcore honour ... it's impossible to believe they couldn't have found a way to increase the accessibility of the game without undermining the gloriously intractable nature of the challenges it contains. [Apr 2004, p.96]
    • 91 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    A much-needed statement of authority for PC - an online spectacle that eclipses the grand rhetoric volleyed back and forth between the manufacturers of tomorrow's super-powered consoles. A new level of multiplayer combat begins here and now, with shock and awe.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    It’s a game that leads by example, never keeping still while making sure you do likewise, and is every bit as essential now as it was 12 months ago.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    The triumph of SpaceChem is that overcoming these situations is more a case of inventing a solution than discovering one - creating a technique on your own terms that, once learned, you find yourself reusing in later stages. [Apr 2011, p.101]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 75 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Simply for the harrowing elegance of this risk-reward proposition, Impossible Road’s lone developer Kevin Ng deserves to have his pockets paved with gold.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    A perfectly sized, expertly-crafted romp, Pacific gives other download games their marching orders. [Aug 2009, p.97]
    • 93 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    It still possesses the series’ trademark ability to deliver Tempest-like ‘in the zone’ moments of remarkable intensity unlike any of its contemporaries, but now comes with a confidently revised dynamic, marking this as Criterion Games’ finest hour. [Oct 2004, p.100]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 88 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    If you've been writing the series' Vita appearance off as a compromise or a contractual obligation, you're in for something of a treat. That 5 inch OLED screen is a chance to see Media Molecule's staggering achievement afresh, and to witness one of this generation's most intriguing engines of creativity at its most energetic and effective.
    • 90 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Civilization's revolution is daring for a series built on expansion. It strips and pares away, making management easy and command enjoyable. [Nov 2010, p.91]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 80 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Outlast’s combination of stealth, platforming and horror is exceptional, the benefits of the diverse experience of its highly talented development team always in plain sight.
    • 89 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Valve has taken something unscripted and dynamic, and seeded it with the right amount of narrative flavour, pacing and spectacle. [Christmas 2008, p.82]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 93 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Okami doesn’t just successfully follow Zelda’s structural template and tone – a rare feat – it makes it its own, toeing that line with grace, ingenuity and a strongly individual style. That’s not only rare, it’s unique. [Dec 2006, p.78]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 85 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    It’s uncompromising and involved and may not be for everyone, but you sense it’s the game Bizarre have been meaning to make for the last seven years, and for that alone, it’s precious. [Nov 2007, p.86]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 92 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    There's a remarkable consistency to the design even as the levels gets steadily bolder until, after hovering vacuums, teleporters, and levers that freeze time, Simogo throws in a climactic boss battle that is as nerve-wracking as it is joyous. It's a compliment to say that Beat Sneak Bandit feels like a Rhythm Tengoku minigame taken to its logical extreme; it's constructed with a precision and a sense of mischief – and, in its final surprise, a generosity of spirit - that echoes the best work of the WarioWare team.
    • 95 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    It's fitting that we're able to steal a line from the script to sum everything up. No spoilers here, just an epitaph, from the moment Cortana turns to Master Chief and says this: "It's not a new plan. But we know it'll work." [Christmas 2004, p.74]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 91 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    If "Far Cry" was a game of ambition, then here is one of power. Power which Crytek has channelled, with both passion and care, into superb freewheeling gunplay. [Christmas 2007, p.84]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 89 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    If L4D2 is sometimes over-complicated by its glut of small innovations, then it also substantially rewards the player with its few large ideas: confusion gives way to depth and dynamism, grander thrills and starker dramas. We’re still interested in the fate of the original game’s heroes, but this sequel affirms that the way ahead is due south.
    • 92 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Rome: Total War is more compelling, more beautiful and more expansive than anything that has gone before. [Dec 2004, p.104]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 94 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    A dazzling package. A singleplayer campaign crammed with set-pieces that pull the player through at breakneck speed sits alongside Spec Ops, 23 co-op missions and a MW greatest hits package, before that superlative multiplayer, which really needs no introduction. With such attractions on offer, this is a shooter that demands playing, and playing again. It is still Call Of Duty, but its execution is skilful, mostly thoughtful, and it boasts the highest of production values.
    • 89 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    The game's excellent controls and stream of grisly scares make it the current standard for survival horror, and it now boasts eruptions of blockbusting action that rival this generation's biggest games. [Feb 2011, p.94]
    • 90 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    It may well have been a great game at its initial deadline, but the staggering level of detail in its amplified incarnation helps it run rings around its already estimable predecessor.
    • 89 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Dark Souls beckons the masochistic with its chilly indifference. If you steel your nerves and persevere, the loot you'll uncover is an adventure so exquisitely morose and far-ranging that it will tug at your mind insistently during the hours you spend apart.
    • 93 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    It may produce an experience which is as gruelling as it is compelling, but that’s a badge of honour the game wears with pride. [Nov 2006, p.86]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 90 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    The ambitious, exacting craftsmanship of Evolution goes a long way to ensuring that every person who gives the game a proper chance will be seduced into becoming precisely such a fan. [May 2012, p.106]
    • 88 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    The Stanley Parable is brave. It’s brave because it offers the freedom to define the parameters of your experience. It’s brave because it’s willing to explore the ways in which games manipulate players, and to extrapolate that point into a discussion of the way we are all manipulated by the structures of real life. It’s brave because it’s willing to make fun of itself.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Codemasters had a hard act to follow in Grid, but with this sequel it’s delivered a dazzling package that can proudly take its place among the best racing games of this generation. It not only smooths off nearly all of the awkward edges that have plagued the studio’s ongoing attempts to cohere its racing games with driver-focused storylines, but it does so with enough pomp and spectacle to send current-generation hardware off with a memorable bang.
    • 90 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    You’ll never be able to play enough Dota 2 to totally master it, and although it’s an F2P game it can be too cruel and unusual for some. But persist through the tough start and accept the idiosyncrasies, and you’ll start to understand why so many have stuck with it for more than a decade. Why would they need something new when they’ve got this incredibly deep, rewarding multiplayer experience?
    • 92 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    The freedom of movement requires a new level of spatial imagination. Before Prince of Persia, platform games were like playing Tetris with only the blocks and bars. [Christmas 2003, p.100]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 89 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Demon's Souls is the antithesis of the fashionable approach to gaming. It encourages mastery over mere perseverance and every reward is so hard won as to make it almost unattainable. But if gaming's ultimate appeal lies in the learning and mastering of new skills, then surely the medium's keenest thrills are to be found in its hardest lessons. For those who flourish under Demon's Souls' strict examination, there's no greater sense of virtual achievement.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    This still stands as one of videogaming’s greatest achievements, one finally properly served by an excellent English translation to reveal a game that feels far fresher than its age, setting and rivals might otherwise suggest. [Nov 2007, p.97]
    • Edge Magazine