Edge Magazine's Scores

  • Games
For 2,611 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 15% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 82% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 9 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Game review score: 64
Highest review score: 100 The Last of Us
Lowest review score: 10 FlatOut 3: Chaos & Destruction
Score distribution:
2,611 game reviews
    • 82 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    In action the game is undeniably pretty, as long as you can stomach the monstrous camera. But beyond ther anime-inspired visuals, the action turgidly limps along without ever really engaging or entertaining. [May 2003, p.94]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 77 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    It's the Excitebots themselves that disappoint most, so drearily conceived that they make the predecessor's humble trucks look like flaming DeLoreans. [July 2009, p.100]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 77 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    Once guns are acquired you feel less helpless, but the combat is awkward with enemies reacting poorly to hits and a compulsory manual reload that is ponderous beyond belief. In trying to make the game realistic, Headfirst has grievously shot itself in the foot. [Dec 2005, p.112]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 77 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    For such a costly flagship title to provide neither the promised statement of mainstream grown-up appeal nor even polished, lesser disposable thrills is a landmark failure. [May 2006, p.92]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 77 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    With the episodic development cycle all but demanding that structure and form be locked down in the first instalment, with content added thereafter, the series' future looks precarious at best. [June 2008, p.90]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 77 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    With no real sense of connection with your monsters, or of engagement with the clumsily delivered plot, there is little here to help the game overcome its tendency towards charmless, chore-based repetition. [Jan 2004, p.106]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 76 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    You wonder if players will have wanted to spend this amount of time loafing around the Homestar Runner universe, or whether their interaction with it is best limited to ten-minute bursts via their web browser. [Oct 2008, p.101]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 75 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    For such a costly flagship title to provide neither the promised statement of mainstream grown-up appeal nor even polished, lesser disposable thrills is a landmark failure. [May 2006, p.92]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 75 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    You get the impression the only person who cares about Kain's legacy any more is the writer. The turgid battling lets an average game down. [Jan 2004, p.107]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 75 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    The pretty basic minigames are bland, and the worst, such as Pot Luck, are based on blind, dumb chance. So are the best, sadly. They’re fun with four people, but what isn’t? [June 2007, p.92]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 75 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    The virtual interface does little to help players and, if anything, slows the game down as you wait for it to catch up with things that are already evident to players – such as victory, failure and boredom. [Dec 2007, p.89]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 74 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    As far as either an authentic simulation or a fun re-imagining goes, it’s like some strange negative of the emperor’s new clothes; the pretty wrapping is there but the body is not. [Mar 2007, p.83]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 74 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    You get the impression the only person who cares about Kain's legacy any more is the writer. The turgid battling lets an average game down. [Jan 2004, p.107]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 74 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    Too brainless for adults, and increasingly too frustrating and needlessly obtuse for children, Lego Batman makes the simplest mistake any franchise title can: it serves the licence, and nobody else. [Dec 2008, p.89]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 74 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    In music, bad tribute acts play pubs and weddings: in games, they sit at the top of the charts.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    Faithful as a bloodhound to the Dreamcast original, this GBA port is a stunning example of when authenticity ought to be sacrificed to utility. This is not a lazy port. But the loyalty of the conversion is ill-advised. [Sept 2003]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 73 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    Instant deaths, glitchy combat, uninspiring boss encounters and twitchy controls conspire to make this a below-par experience. If it wasn't for the occasional flashes of imagination and the familiarity and richness conveyed through the license then The Emperor's Tomb would be utterly forgettable. [May 2003, p.99]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 73 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    As [Vince] laments the formulaic impositions of the game in successive cut-scenes, it only serves to remind you how much of a chore it is to play - and raises the question; why does every platform hero have to be a wiseguy? [Dec 2003, p.108]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 73 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    You wonder if players will have wanted to spend this amount of time loafing around the Homestar Runner universe, or whether their interaction with it is best limited to ten-minute bursts via their web browser. [Oct 2008, p.101]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 73 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    You can see things worth admiring here. The promise of sandbox combat emerging from the interplay between environment and gun-modes never comes good, instead devolving into a repetitive, gruelling bedlam - but that promise alone is more than many shooters offer. To make anything of it, however, Hard Reset would need to go right back to the drawing board.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 30 Critic Score
    European Assault is one of the ugliest current-gen games we’ve seen. Boring textures, a weak palette and a flimsy design ethic all round make it appear like slightly dressed up PSone data. The animation seems inspired by amateur puppetry and even the menus look like they were knocked up in the last day before submission. [Aug 2005, p.94]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 73 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    The last thing on Glory Days’ mind is fun: it instead angrily stomps forward to the beat of the ‘war is hell’ drum. [Oct 2007, p.99]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 73 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    Somebody up there probably regards this as a trailblazing taste of high-concept, one-size-fits-all blockbuster games to come. Consider that, and know true Primal fear. [March 2003, p.92]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 73 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    Instant deaths, glitchy combat, uninspiring boss encounters and twitchy controls conspire to make this a below-par experience. If it wasn't for the occasional flashes of imagination and the familiarity and richness conveyed through the license then The Emperor's Tomb would be utterly forgettable. [May 2003, p.99]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 72 Metascore
    • 30 Critic Score
    European Assault is one of the ugliest current-gen games we've seen. Boring textures, a weak palette and a flimsy design ethic all round make it appear like slightly dressed up PSone data. The animation seems inspired by amateur puppetry and even the menus look like they were knocked up in the last day before submission. [Aug 2005, p.94]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 72 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    Prinny sabotages the player's platforming with unsympathetic controls. [Aug 2009, p.106]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 72 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    Approached free of any expectations higher than endless, mindless single-button mashing, the kenpu collecting and scenery spotting can provide some limited enjoyment in smaller doses, but approached as an epic quest, Key Of Heaven is one better left untaken. [Mar 2006, p.94]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 72 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    Should a game about surviving an alcoholic, abusive parent be fun? Probably not. But it gains nothing from being wearying and frustrating.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    This is a smart template for future fun, but the details need work. When it comes to getting this kind of game onto iOS then, Madfinger has, in more ways than one, done all the boring bits.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    While there are some interesting mini-games to break up the wandering, Grunty's Revenge is mainly an abject lesson in breadcrumb following game design. [Dec 2003, p.106]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 72 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    For such a costly flagship title to provide neither the promised statement of mainstream grown-up appeal nor even polished, lesser disposable thrills is a landmark failure. [May 2006, p.92]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 72 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    Army Of Two is relatively straightforward thirdperson shooter, focused on large-scale skirmishes and the dynamics of a two-man team. It’s serviceable enough in some regards. [Apr 2008, p.91]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 71 Metascore
    • 30 Critic Score
    The world doesn't have the charm to warrant forgiveness, and progress-halting bugs prevent it anyway. With regular AI freezes and vanishing items, a mistimed autosave can prove fatal. Ultimately it all invites the refashioning of another line from Romero. When there's no more room in development hell, the dead losses will walk the Earth.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    The possibility of this all coming together in a more flexible and engaging manner is still a welcome one. But, for a game based on a culture of reputation, craftsmanship and leaving a mark, Getting Up is one that'll pass by largely unnoticed. [Mar 2006, p.86]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 71 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    Nasty, brutish and short - and that's once you've got past the interface problems. Temple of Elemental Evil is a huge disappointment by any measure. [Christmas 2003, p.124]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 71 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    This is a perfectly awful conversion with poor controls, cumbersome combat, an antiquarian save system, inadequate maps and clumsy menu design. [Jan 2004, p.111]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 71 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    As a novelty, this is fine and will provide the odd fun moment. But unlike its endlessly replayable older brothers, you won’t be coming back. [Sept 2008, p.90]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 71 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    So indebted is dev studio Matrix to the old ways that it seems to have granted a free pass to the old problems. Quest signposting is buried in unclear dialogue snippets, bosses are beaten through trial and error, and grinding is rife. [Dec 2010, p.99]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 71 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    Among its many failings one stands out as cardinal and, despite the slick presentation, simply can’t be forgiven: you never really feel in control of what’s going on. [Aug 2008, p.94]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 71 Metascore
    • 30 Critic Score
    European Assault is one of the ugliest current-gen games we've seen. Boring textures, a weak palette and a flimsy design ethic all round make it appear like slightly dressed up PSone data. The animation seems inspired by amateur puppetry and even the menus look like they were knocked up in the last day before submission. [Aug 2005, p.94]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 71 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    Supernauts is both too limited to succeed as a town-builder and frustratingly restrictive as a creative tool, while its superhero interludes are disempowering and dull. [Sept 2014, p.116]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 71 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    The plot may be filled with sub-Lynchian fumbles, but it weaves an intriguing story, while the charismatic muddle of awards that accompanies each solution goes some way to wiping away the grey memory of what you're actually being congratulated for.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    Each of the areas you’ll traverse in Scurge feel like they’ve simply had a box of random enemies shaken into it, all making a sudden focused beeline toward you the minute you set foot in the room. [Nov 2006, p.92]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 70 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    Jett Rocket's mistakes remind us of the N64 days, when developers were feeling their way through Nintendo's brave new 3D world. [Aug 2010, p.99]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 70 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    Ultimately, World Rally is not a bad game, just entirely unnecessary.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    Judged solely on its Balance Board controls, Skate It comes up little short of unplayable thanks to a bewildering complexity. [Jan 2009, p.96]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 70 Metascore
    • 30 Critic Score
    It resembles nothing more than a Skinner box, eventually rewarding your endless hours of button pressing with a short, amusing skit or a familiar face from the Star Wars universe. While some will no doubt be snared by its insidious little feedback loops, we can only reiterate Ackbar’s grave warning: it’s a trap.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    You get the impression the only person who cares about Kain's legacy any more is the writer. The turgid battling lets an average game down. [Jan 2004, p.107]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 70 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    For a series that puts so much stock in its grace and composure, the lack of an intuitive control scheme is hard to overcome. [June 2007, p.86]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 70 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    A pretty but vapid experience. [Sept 2010, p.98]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 69 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    Nintendo is claiming that The Conduit might attract Halo fans to its console, but this game isn’t fit to wait Master Chief’s table.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    Sparsely scattered save points, un-skippable animations and cutscenes, and repeated locations and boss fights are anachronisms that will frustrate and alienate all but the most ardent traditionalist.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    The possibility of this all coming together in a more flexible and engaging manner is still a welcome one. But, for a game based on a culture of reputation, craftsmanship and leaving a mark, Getting Up is one that’ll pass by largely unnoticed. [Mar 2006, p.86]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 69 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    The possibility of this all coming together in a more flexible and engaging manner is still a welcome one. But, for a game based on a culture of reputation, craftsmanship and leaving a mark, Getting Up is one that’ll pass by largely unnoticed. [Mar 2006, p.86]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 69 Metascore
    • 30 Critic Score
    Clock Tower 3 is never scary: rather it's unwitting proof of the banality of evil. [June 2003, p.101]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 69 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    Ends up feeling like it's been built by PC game developers obsessed with quick saves. There's absolutely no creative latitude; it's a case of remembering where enemies appear and getting them before they get you. [May 2005, p.86]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 68 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    A remake that's peculiarly of its time: a western-style, casual gaming aping of the Japanese shoot 'em up that's less homage than banal dilution, and the game sucks the life and vibrancy from its rich lineage. [July 2008, p.99]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 68 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    Playing it instils a completely neutral response, as though it were no more than a means of absorbing time. [Jan 2008, p.91]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 68 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    Playing Gungrave OD, there's a nagging sensation that the design team experienced the original through a shop window...In attempting to meet criticisms of Gungrave's single-minded focus, that focus has been squandered. The result is unlikely to satisfy. [May 2004, p.110]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 67 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    Occasionally gripping but frequently unfulfilling, Sniper Elite V2 comes in at a heavy price for a package that's all gore and little reward.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    Ends up feeling like it’s been built by PC game developers obsessed with quick saves. There’s absolutely no creative latitude; it’s a case of remembering where enemies appear and getting them before they get you. [May 2005, p.86]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 67 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    For a title trying hard to inject personality into the genre, the experience feels irreparably mechanical. There's plenty of variety in terms of racing categories and machinery, but the overall lack of involvement is inexcusable. [Feb 2004, p.102]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 66 Metascore
    • 30 Critic Score
    There's practically no aspect that doesn't appear half-hearted. Black Isle's drawn-out death has undoubtedly poisoned Brotherhood, but it's hard to tell if there was ever a good game here to begin with. [May 2004, p.109]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 66 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    Unfortunately, no sooner does Geist suggest it can blossom into something fresh and exciting that it's undermined at every turn by a frustrating insistence on being nothing more than a mundane firstperson shooter. [Oct 2005, p.88]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 66 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    While the basic mechanic shows promise, the game itself is purely mechanical, and predictably joyless as a result. [July 2006, p.92]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 66 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    The story is inventively fantastical but ridiculously so, like a child’s weightless daydreaming, and its shallowness is made all the clearer by Agetec’s lifeless and laborious translation. [Feb 2006, p.92]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 66 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    For a title trying hard to inject personality into the genre, the experience feels irreparably mechanical. There's plenty of variety in terms of racing categories and machinery, but the overall lack of involvement is inexcusable. [Feb 2004, p.102]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 66 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    As an interim project, it's good to see Criterion still interested in its most beloved IP, but it's just a shame there's so little of interest in the game itself.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    The majority of insights are lost in a flood of banal dialogue and sluggish, shallow puzzles. [Aug 2009, p.107]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 65 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    Instant deaths, glitchy combat, uninspiring boss encounters and twitchy controls conspire to make this a below-par experience. If it wasn't for the occasional flashes of imagination and the familiarity and richness conveyed through the license then The Emperor's Tomb would be utterly forgettable. [May 2003, p.99]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 65 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    Something of a departure, sure, but it's nothing new. Falling awkwardly between action and strategy, it's unlikely to satisfy anyone other than rabidly obsessive fans of the character.
    • Edge Magazine
    • 65 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    Darkspore remains a humdrum deep-space Diablo, but one doomed to be defined more by what it's missing than what it offers. [June 2011, p.98]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 65 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    The irony is that in mining some unforgettable games, Curve has delivered a forgettable hodgepodge. [Mar 2011, p.105]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 65 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    In-app purchases require delicate balancing, but with T-Coin bundles costing up to £69.99, and annual T-Club subscriptions available for £20.99 a year, EA could hardly be more obvious in letting you know that, as far as it's concerned, the 69p you paid to download the game was only the beginning.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 30 Critic Score
    The levels are so gloomy, grey and fog-drenched (there's even fog in the mall) that it's hard to see buildings in the near distance, nevermind enemies. Dark, oppressive and torturous, Omega Strain is about as much fun as a wet weekend in a Kafka novel. [July 2004, p.107]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 65 Metascore
    • 20 Critic Score
    Objects that can be interacted with are circled with an icon, but this only appears if you are looking at exactly the right spot. Indeed, much of Rogue Ops is spent trying to make this cursed cursor appear. It's not a pleasant way to spend an evening. [Feb 2004, p.108]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 64 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    Arzest has laid an egg here, but not of the golden variety.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    Whether there truly is a demand for the high-fidelity thrills found on other formats among shooter-starved Wii owners is largely academic, because Conduit 2 - like its predecessor - just isn't up to the task of providing them. [June 2011, p.92]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 64 Metascore
    • 30 Critic Score
    There's practically no aspect that doesn't appear half-hearted. Black Isle's drawn-out death has undoubtedly poisoned Brotherhood, but it's hard to tell if there was ever a good game here to begin with. [May 2004, p.109]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 64 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    Unless you possess a particular zeal for collecting and upgrading slightly different weapons, the familiarity of slicing through yet another batch of spawning creatures soon grinds way at the thin gameplay. [June 2009, p.97]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 64 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    An ugly, throwaway cash grab. [March 2015, p.110]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 64 Metascore
    • 30 Critic Score
    The Run doesn't have the structure or production values to carry off its concept. Even if it did, its successes would be smothered by a procession of awful technical flaws. Lacking charm and polish, only the Need For Speed name will sell the game – which will no doubt mean that it fares well enough. But in a year that has seen gaming's biggest franchises one-upping each 
other and demanding players' attention like never before, The Run simply doesn't cut it.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    Its stripped-back beat-matching will leave you tapping your foot - but out of impatience as much as approval of its grimy dubstep. [Feb 2011, p.103]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 64 Metascore
    • 30 Critic Score
    The original HOTD: Overkill is no holy grail of the genre, but it did spice up the ailing niche with some eccentricity and zany thrills. To see it massacred in this way is a shame both for the series and for iOS newcomers whose first taste of this most guilty of pleasures will be a sour one.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    The game effectively highlights the difference between a sandbox which facilitates player experimentation, and a game environment that only allows prescribed actions. [May 2009, p.95]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 64 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    There’s a nugget of brilliance at the heart of Micro Machines that’s too simple and solid to crush, it’s true, but the laughable track editor, fussy interface and baffling load times certainly don’t justify this release. [Aug 2006, p.93]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 63 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    A soulless videogame that stands as a grave indictment of how stale a series can become if it loses its spark of creativity and imagination. [March 2005, p.93]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 63 Metascore
    • 20 Critic Score
    Objects that can be interacted with are circled with an icon, but this only appears if you are looking at exactly the right spot. Indeed, much of Rogue Ops is spent trying to make this cursed cursor appear. It's not a pleasant way to spend an evening. [Feb 2004, p.108]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 63 Metascore
    • 30 Critic Score
    The frequent glitches and pop-up testify to a lack of preparation, and a question has to be asked about what exactly Treyarch has been doing for the past two years. [July 2007, p.89]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 63 Metascore
    • 30 Critic Score
    Successful only as an interactive showcase of Jurevicius' art – and arguably the Flash original was more effective in that regard – it's almost criminal that a world this vivid should be so wearying to explore.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    Lords Of Shadow 2 is clunky, ugly and deeply misguided. It’s a game that sees the lord of the damned as a vehicle for rat-powered linear stealth, and that takes a future-Gothic London setting and then sets the action in tower blocks and sewers.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    Sonic games, and platformers in general, have always been about memorising the lay of the land, but rarely have mistakes been so costly or heavily punished, and it says much that one retailer’s preorder bonus consists solely of 25 additional lives.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    There are some interesting ideas here, but in practice the game is overloaded with cut corners and blunting repetition. [Mar 2010, p.97]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 63 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    Despite the obvious talent at work here, the studio has chosen to bury The Order's potential under a fug of dissociative, QTE-focused game design that's as stifling as the smog that creeps through its Victorian streets. [Apr 2015, p.106]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 63 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    Given that its bland combat is little enhanced by the ability to create cover, you suspect that the promises made for the technology have simply dug its own grave. [Dec 2008, p.90]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 63 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    It's the cutest game we've seen in a while, but not nearly as good as it looks. [July 2010, p.105]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 62 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    There's a fine line between graphic artistry and immaturity, and while Alter Echo makes an attempt at the former, it probably falls into the latter. The hues are creative enough, and the faux-naturelle structures suitably curled and alien but perhaps the real problem is that a world made from plastic would look as dull as it sounds. [Nov 2003, p.109]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 62 Metascore
    • 30 Critic Score
    Technically, ... Dead Man's Hand is a mess - which is a shame because this could have been a whole barrel of fun. [May 2004, p.107]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 62 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    A stunt-filled shooter in the vein (but not the league) of Stranglehold, it's a game that takes control away, reverts to how things used to be done, and judders between debilitating combat and haywire presentation. [May 2009, p.92]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 62 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    A maddening, misguided mongrel of a game... Luck plays a huge part, and simply navigating the world can be exactly as hard as the hardest challenge: a random, enraging, minutes-long bore, especially with moving enemies straying across your line. [Dec 2005, p.115]
    • Edge Magazine