Entertainment Weekly's Scores

For 5,286 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 68% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 30% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 3.9 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Movie review score: 66
Highest review score: 100 Fever Pitch
Lowest review score: 0 Mr. Magorium's Wonder Emporium
Score distribution:
5,286 movie reviews
  1. Graeme and Clive, representatives of a nation of nonbelievers in UFOs and big dinner portions, come to the psychic capital of a country that wants to believe, and they're transformed. In Paul, Simon Pegg and Nick Frost do likewise, in celebration of what the Spielbergian cosmos is all about.
    • 89 Metascore
    • 83 Critic Score
    Surprisingly, given Lee's penchant for experimentation, there's nothing remotely innovative about this sober, often intensely moving exploration of a community's lingering grief and outrage -- just the usual talking heads, stock footage, montages of stills, and such.
  2. Bale is mesmerizing and Rodriguez keeps up with him as the whole unsafe contraption zooms.
  3. The film is held together by Clive Owen, who spends most of his time on screen hidden beneath matted hair and a scruffy beard but still has more aura than any actor around.
  4. The visual and verbal jokes are as bouncy and multilevel (hip height for adults, knee-slap-size for kids) as we have come, no doubt selfishly, to expect from DreamWorks.
  5. The Fifth Estate is flawed (it grips the brain but not the heart), yet it feverishly exposes the tenor of whistle-blowing in the brave new world, with the Internet as a billboard for anyone out to spill secrets. Call it the anti-social network.
  6. That's Trumbo's message -- that the true victim was America.
  7. The man has the right to retire, but what will he do with all the words in his head?
  8. Win Win, it turns out, isn't a tale of facile victory. It's a movie about how loss makes everyone do things they'll both defend and regret.
  9. The director, Joseph Lovett, wants us to ask if there's such a thing as too much freedom, and he has the sobriety to say yes -- and no.
  10. In its wickedly twisted way, Nightcrawler keeps "Network's" battle cry alive. It's a 21st-century takedown of the media's pandering ''if it bleeds, it leads'' ethos and the ghoulish nightcrawlers who live by it.
  11. Monsters is really a road-movie romance that tracks the burgeoning relationship between two strangers as they travel through the "infected" zone.
  12. The joy of cartoons meets the agony of office politics in this fascinating, inside- Hollywood-baseball documentary.
  13. Clever, laid-back.
  14. The Australian actress Frances O'Connor is a true find. She's as beautiful as the young Barbara Hershey, with a stare that's pensive yet playful, and she puts us in touch with the quiet battle of emotions in Fanny.
  15. So jaunty, so limber, and so visually self-assured that art peeks through where crap has traditionally made its home.
  16. Slow -- sometimes maddeningly, soporifically so.
  17. Cameron wants to take the audience ''back to 'Titanic,''' but the journey's magic is hemmed in, paradoxically, by the transcendence of his previous effort; surely he must know that a lot of us never left.
  18. The result is fairly silly slapstick, but Alda, hair disheveled and brow knit with stubborn intent, is both fierce and quietly heartbreaking.
  19. This gripping if tamped-down drama is steeped in ancient Albanian culture, where the real, tragic consequences of blood feuds can keep families trapped in their homes for generations.
  20. This charming, if unnecessarily coronation-length production gets the duckling-to-swan ambivalence just right.
  21. Even from the safety of a movie seat, you can just about feel the stinging hardness of the surf. Blue crush? This is more like white smash.
  22. Cloud Atlas is certainly out to be a ''visionary'' mindbender, but the film's secret is that it's a nimbly entertaining and light-on-its-feet Hollywood contraption, with the actors cast in multiple roles as if playing a game of dress-up.
  23. Aniston works so hard to avoid sentimentality that it's disappointing when it creeps into the film. Director Daniel Barnz casts everything in a blue-yellow light that oversells the melancholy mood.
  24. 2 Guns is a much-needed reminder that the best summer surprises can come when you least expect them.
  25. The key to The Company is the quiet, focused rapture of Neve Campbell, who formally trained in ballet and performed all of her on-screen dances. The tranquil delight she takes in her body becomes its own eloquent form of acting.
  26. The final affirmation of this romance is really an affirmation of Baumbach's talent: that a young filmmaker fixated on the solipsistic rituals of guyhood understands the hearts of women, too.
  27. Control goes past the clich├ęs of punk rock-god gloom to offer a snapshot of alienation that's shockingly humane.
  28. Joseph Gordon-Levitt and Lynn Collins are so interesting that it's easy to put up with the decision-making dithering that goes along with the title.
  29. Even when the catharsis we yearn for arrives, it's tinged with restraint. But then, the true romance in Shall We Dance? is more than personal. It's the spectacle of a nation learning to dance with itself.

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