Entertainment Weekly's Scores

For 5,516 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 68% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 30% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 3.8 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Movie review score: 66
Highest review score: 100 Meek's Cutoff
Lowest review score: 0 8 Heads in a Duffel Bag
Score distribution:
5516 movie reviews
  1. The stunning images aren't enough for Herzog, though. He wants us to see how these quirky researchers, in their lust to explore, are acting out a drive as primitive as nature: the need to break away from the world in order to find it.
  2. This enveloping dream of an epic narrative experiment comes from the great Chilean-born, France-based filmmaker Raúl Ruiz (Time Regained).
  3. Mr. Lazarescu is that rich and riveting a film of universal small human moments and big-system failure.
  4. By far the best Judd Apatow comedy that Judd Apatow had nothing at all to do with.
  5. Watching Eternal Sunshine, you don't just watch a love story -- you fall in love with what love really is.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    A movie with exquisite period detail. [8 Apr 1994]
    • Entertainment Weekly
  6. The result: This great work of art has the potential to change the world.
    • 94 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    [Tarantino's] ability to take what seem like minor conversational themes and dovetail them onto later exchanges for maximum comic effect is close to genius. And the action can be literally heart-stopping.
  7. The gorgeous music includes Ralph Vaughan Williams' wafting tone poem ''The Lark Ascending'' -- apt in describing an artist who might well be part bird.
  8. A conventionally heightened series of escapes and clashes and hide-and-seek gambits, yet the way the film has been made, nothing that happens seems inevitable -- which is to say, anything seems possible. There's a word for that sensation. It's called excitement.
  9. It's a scrumptious and dizzy-spirited lark, a what-the-hell-let's-rob-the-casino flick made with so much wit and brains and dazzle and virtuosity that the sheer speed and cleverness of the caper hits you like a shot of pure oxygen.
  10. Oren Moverman's Rampart is a terrific film: tense, shocking, complex, mesmerizing.
  11. Achieves its exquisite tension--deepening beautifully from a "Death in Venice" setup to an imaginative meditation, on art and life, of uncommon sensitivity.
  12. The miracle of the movie is the way that director Alfonso Cuarón, using special effects and 3-D with a nearly poetic simplicity and command, places the audience right up there in space along with them.
  13. With an authenticity that is tender and merciless, the movie shows you what it looks like when youth rebellion becomes a form of fascism.
  14. Stunning, fully formed masterpiece.
  15. The film, by seasoned cinematographer Dror Moreh, is a feat — of access and of passionate and appropriately unsettling political commentary.
  16. Potent and eye-opening documentary.
  17. A marvelous movie.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    Director Bruce Beresford's tightly focused adaptation retains all the impact of its Pulitzer Prize-winning stage original. Jessica Tandy and Morgan Freeman give exceptional performances as the aging widow and the sage black chauffeur who enlightens her in the segregated South.
  18. These 173 minutes don't drag, they waltz.
  19. Brilliant and psychologically transfixing documentary.
  20. Rapt, heady, and startling: the most profound documentary I've seen this decade.
  21. Definition eludes the delicate pleasures of this marvelous, idiosyncratic movie collage.
  22. Until Once, I'm not sure that I'd ever seen a small-scale, nonstylized, kitchen-sink drama in which the songs take on the majesty and devotion of a musical dream.
  23. Yagira's performance is so extraordinary, it won him the best actor prize at the 2004 Cannes film festival.
  24. The picture moves with stealth, enjoying its own thriller-ness as hints are laid and mislaid. There's a sense that Hitchcock is hovering in the background and cheering for Auteuil, who musters all his French superstardom to play a man having his mask of blandness torn off.
  25. Room is more than the title of one of the year’s most powerful movies — it’s a state of mind that’s unbearably tense and as claustrophobic as a straitjacket
  26. The setting is somewhere between a post-WWII Brigadoon and the environs of Marcel Carn classic "Children of Paradise," but the story is as timely as this morning's news from Europe.
  27. The first animated feature produced entirely on computer is a magically witty and humane entertainment, a hellzapoppin fairy tale about a roomful of suburban toys who come to life when humans aren't around.

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