Entertainment Weekly's Scores

For 5,200 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 68% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 30% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 3.8 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Movie review score: 66
Highest review score: 100 The Return
Lowest review score: 0 Valentine's Day
Score distribution:
5,200 movie reviews
  1. It's a potent and moving experience, because by the end you feel you've witnessed nothing less than the birth of a soul.
  2. What matters is that Tiana triumphs as both a girl and a frog, that dreams are fulfilled, wrongs are righted, love prevails, and music unites not only a princess and a frog but also kids and grown-ups.
  3. A marvelous rock doc that manages to be wistful, tasty, and jam-kicking at the same time.
  4. A rapturous and enlightening look at the history of the environmental movement in America.
  5. With its virtuoso tomfoolery, Fantastic Mr. Fox is like a homegrown Wallace and Gromit caper. To Wes Anderson: More, please!
  6. Lusciously revealing fly-on-the-wall portrait of Anna Wintour.
  7. Along the way, Black Dynamite blends satire, nostalgia, and cinema deconstruction into a one-of-a-kind comedy high.
  8. Toy Story 3 is a salute to the magic of making believe.
  9. Another must-see marvel of horror, comedy, and impeccable filmmaking by the Korean director Bong Joon-ho.
  10. Up in the Air is light and dark, hilarious and tragic, romantic and real. It's everything that Hollywood has forgotten how to do; we're blessed that Jason Reitman has remembered
  11. A marvelous and touching yuletide toy of a movie.
  12. Yet another outstanding little movie in the exciting Romanian New Wave.
  13. Emotionally mesmerizing.
  14. Beautifully led by birdlike Sylvie Testud as an ailing young woman in a wheelchair, every character (pilgrim and helper alike) exhibits a soul. And shaped with confident talent by the Austrian filmmaker, every serenely composed shot matters.
  15. There's also no romanticizing on the part of the director, who proceeds with calm, unshowy attentiveness (even in the midst of scenes of violence), creating a stunning portrait of an innately smart survivor for whom prison turns out to be a twisted opportunity for self-definition.
  16. Awesome documentary.
  17. An exhilarating hall-of-mirrors look at what happens when global art fame turns anonymous, artists become objects, fans turn into artists, and the whole what's-sincere-and-what's-a-sham spectacle is more fun than art was ever supposed to be.
  18. She's a teller of hilarious gutbucket truths as surely as Lenny Bruce and Richard Pryor ever were. Yet while they were consumed by their demons, Rivers is just the opposite.
  19. One of the unshowiest and most true-blooded epics of Americana you're ever likely to see.
  20. Jaoui neatly, gently, firmly slips political commentary into Let It Rain's articulate mayhem.
  21. It took writer-director Samuel ''Shmulik'' Maoz nearly 30 years to make this disturbing, visceral, personal film.
  22. This warm, funny, sexy, smart movie erases the boundaries between specialized ''gay content'' and universal ''family content'' with such sneaky authority.
  23. Hersonski quietly and insistently unravels reality from "reality"; her commitment to archival authenticity is its own tribute to those no longer able to testify.
  24. This is essential viewing for understanding our world.
  25. The power of The Social Network is that Zuckerberg is a weasel with a mission that can never be dismissed. The movie suggests that he may have built his ambivalence about human connection into Facebook's very DNA. That's what makes him a jerk-hero for our time.
  26. A true-life adventure that turns into a one-man disaster movie - and the darker it gets, the more enthralling it becomes.
  27. Kevin Costner, as Bobby's carpenter brother-in-law, does the finest character acting of his career.
  28. A riveting and unexpectedly inspiring essay on the peace that comes from shared physical and mental concentration.
  29. Tiny Furniture is proof, against steep odds, that there are no small stories, only small storytellers.
  30. Damien Chazelle's extraordinary black-and-white retro dream of a feature debut.

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