Entertainment Weekly's Scores

For 5,319 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 68% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 30% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 3.8 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Movie review score: 66
Highest review score: 100 Far From Heaven
Lowest review score: 0 Crime and Punishment in Suburbia
Score distribution:
5,319 movie reviews
  1. The more that secret comes out, the more incoherent (and ludicrous) the film gets.
  2. The creepy-faced robot twin babies are funny (for a while); the rest of the film is not. It's like "Meet the Parents" with Dr. Phil as the officiant from hell.
  3. The movie wants to be Hitchcockian, but it's the flat-footed Hitchcock of "Marnie" that Park evokes. His filmmaking here is hermetic and lugubrious, with each physical movement meaninglessly heightened and every line hanging in the air with (empty) significance.
    • 19 Metascore
    • 42 Critic Score
    The pathogenic agent to fear, however, is the one that evidently turned every line of dialogue into inane gibberish.
  4. Trite lessons are learned. Plotlines play out in familiar arcs. A few blips of sex and drug use aim to make the movie feel more grown-up. Instead, they make it off-limits to the only age group likely to find any charm in its smug Britcom cutesiness.
  5. The film tries to paint in shades of gray with vague criticisms of the war on drugs, but the absurdity of its he-man Everyman plot ends up turning its moral palette a muddy brown.
  6. The movie is a folly, a desultory vanity project for its director and co-writer. But for those very reasons, W.E., by world-renowned personage and lesser-known filmmaker Madonna, is not without twisted interest.
  7. Bale exists all too large under the circumstances, a well-fed actor playing at emaciation for the sake of a fiction about a character whose torment is as unreadable as his vertebrae are countable.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 42 Critic Score
    Pierson, with his carrot-thin frame, gogglish specs, and gnashingly quick temper, traipses around Taveuni like the king of the white-man geeks, alternately proclaiming the saintliness of his crusade and throwing tantrums whenever somebody else fails to sufficiently recognize it.
  8. Be wary of any movie in which the hero is monosyllabic and a stutterer at the same time.
  9. The film's chief novelty turns out to be its drab ''literary'' approach to horror.
  10. The big goofball relies too much on the funny hair and swingin' postures of the era as punchlines in themselves.
  11. Scored to a disarmingly quaint array of fiddle-and-banjo tunes, The Newton Boys has so little in the way of blood or rancor that before long, you begin to notice that there's no real drama in it, either.
  12. The problem with the movie isn't that it sells out Rocky and Bullwinkle -- it's that it can't keep up with them.
  13. It allows for little of the dark and funny in Irving's picaresque morality fable. No room! Not with the buckets of bathos thrown our way, substituting for mass-market spiritual uplift!
  14. Love means never having to say you're recycling plot material.
  15. Thumpingly silly yet self-serious period-piece what-if.
    • 25 Metascore
    • 42 Critic Score
    (Madonna is) clearly full of good intentions; too bad she's lacking discernible emotions.
  16. Traffics in the coyly blasphemous, aren't-we-dysfunctional family-disaster chic that has become the single most annoying trend in independent filmmaking.
  17. I can't imagine what Dali or Buñuel would have made of such bourgeois sentimentality.
    • 33 Metascore
    • 42 Critic Score
    Don't hate yourself for chuckling at this sweetly anachronistic update of the 1970 Neil Simon comedy.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 42 Critic Score
    It falls apart with a slapdash final act that doesn't work as drama or action and only serves to undermine Jonah's heroics.
  18. In this American remake of the spooky, more-atmospheric-than-coherent 2005 J-horror thriller, the ghosts blink and crackle into existence with an electromagnetic sputter, but really, they're not so different from the gauzy, see-through spirits of yesteryear.
  19. The Monuments Men sounds like a what's-not-to-like? movie, but it turns out to be a bizarre failure.
  20. Les Liaisons Dangereuses is such an elaborate and satisfying structure of deceit and salaciousness that every attempt I have seen to adapt it on film -- "Dangerous Liaisons," "Cruel Intentions," even the trashy 1959 Roger Vadim version -- has resulted in an entertainment of agreeable nasty elegance. Until now.
  21. Extraordinarily faithful to the spirit of that creaky, derivative, fly-infested, don't-go-in-the-attic boofest.
  22. Quite honestly, you could nap for an hour and not miss a thing, but when the crew finally makes it to the glowing piles of booty at Treasure Planet's core, the film unleashes some pleasing visual fireworks. That's where it should have started, not ended.
  23. This wan, formulaic teen movie from ''Metro'' director Thomas Carter is afraid to pump up the volume on its own interracial, hip hop Romeo and Juliet story, lest it challenge even one sedated viewer or disturb the peace.
  24. Taylor does that thing she does when she whispers as if she has just discovered speech; Pearce enjoys himself doing his own singing, and embracing grunge.
  25. Just when you thought it was safe to go to the movies without sitting through another imitation of early Quentin Tarantino, along comes Suicide Kings.

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