Entertainment Weekly's Scores

For 3,376 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 81% higher than the average critic
  • 1% same as the average critic
  • 18% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 5.4 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Music review score: 78
Highest review score: 100 Wounded Rhymes
Lowest review score: 0 Playing With Fire
Score distribution:
3376 music reviews
    • 74 Metascore
    • 83 Critic Score
    Cabello’s voice isn’t especially distinctive, but it’s instinctually pretty: effortless and warm, with an edge of morning-after rasp.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 83 Critic Score
    In an age of hot takes and cold snark, the band’s grand earnestness feels like the artifact of another time, an art lost to nearly everyone save a few fellow statesmen (Mr. Springsteen comes to mind). And it’s all over the group’s 14th studio album, aptly titled Songs of Experience, a record so defiantly full of hard-earned hope and fortitude it seems to blot out the bleaker realities of 2017 through sheer Irish willpower.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 83 Critic Score
    Utopia is almost completely a sensory experience, fantastical soundscapes designed for secret snowflake rituals and Valkyrie picnics. In the midst of so much esoterica, it’s hard sometimes not to miss the more accessible Björk of the ’90s and early 2000s.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 75 Critic Score
    Reputation is an oddly bifurcated creation, half obsessed with grim score-settling and celebrity damage, half infatuated with a lover who takes her away from all that.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 75 Critic Score
    The R&B- and funk-laden Blues, their best and most cohesive set of the decade, is actually worth some appointment listening.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 75 Critic Score
    Turning heartache into Top 40 magic is Smith’s strength--he famously thanked an ex for his success during a Grammys speech--but only a few moments here truly resonate emotionally. One of those is the staggering standout “HIM.”
    • 73 Metascore
    • 83 Critic Score
    As cohesive and self-assured as this collection feels, Meaning doesn’t seem especially interested in scaling the heights of early smashes like “Since U Been Gone” or “Because of You.” Instead, it swings low and sweet--a refreshingly real dispatch from an artist expressing exactly what she feels in this moment, and nothing less.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 91 Critic Score
    What Lotta Sea Lice lacks in flashiness, it makes up for with enduring tunes and performances that, low-stakes as they are, seem destined to resonate and yield fresh surprises for years to come.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 91 Critic Score
    Pink reunites with trusted collaborators like Max Martin, Shellback, Greg Kurstin and Billy Mann on Beautiful Trauma. They help make the record sound both fresh and familiar, with occasional curves like the gospelized rave-up “I Am Here.”
    • 88 Metascore
    • 91 Critic Score
    Five studio albums in, it feels more like another new beginning, and pretty close to a masterpiece.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 83 Critic Score
    The glossy production here sometimes neuters Beck's wilder inclinations. ... Still, as his first upbeat album in nearly a decade, Colors proves that Beck is still one of rock's most intrepid inventors. [13 Oct 2017, p.58]
    • 72 Metascore
    • 75 Critic Score
    The best parts of the album are on the first half and showcase Lovato’s swagger, especially the standout gospel-tinged title track.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 83 Critic Score
    Now
    Those who would disparage her for not sounding like the “old Shania” are missing the point of this album--and with songs this good, they’re missing out, too.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 75 Critic Score
    On Younger Now she is fully her father Billy Ray’s daughter, leaning into the echoey twang of spaghetti-Western stomper “Bad Mood,” rhapsodizing about dirty feet and backyard creeks on “Inspired,” and duetting blithely with godmother Dolly Parton on the summer-­camp jamboree “Rainbowland.”
    • 63 Metascore
    • 67 Critic Score
    It’s a sprawling set that displays many different sides of his personality, from party boy (the old-school groove “Levitate”) to spiritual dad (the gospel-charged “Church”). Although it is uneven and feels longer than its 60 minutes, Gemini is held together by Macklemore’s Everydudeness and a loose mixtape quality.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 75 Critic Score
    Although the new album doesn’t live up to its effusive title by recapturing the glory of Sam’s Town--there’s no “When You Were Young” here--it affirms that the Killers are far from dead yet.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 91 Critic Score
    As gratifying familiar as much of American Dream will be to longtime fans, it also feels like exactly the album 2017 needs--urgent, angry, achingly self-aware. And catchy as hell, too. [1 Sep 2017, p.53]
    • 64 Metascore
    • 67 Critic Score
    Fifth Harmony’s pop-by-committee could have fared fabulously well had it risen in the heat earlier this year; instead it’s a harmless record that doesn’t quite demand a second listen.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 91 Critic Score
    Rainbow, her rich, masterful third LP, is far more than a kiss-off to old demons--it’s an artistic feat, as Kesha unites stylistic forays with her sharp, weathered lyricism.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 83 Critic Score
    Like Everything Now‘s subject matter, Arcade Fire gets a bit excessive--yet their fearlessness has resulted in some of the most ambitious music of their career.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 91 Critic Score
    Mostly HAIM zero in on what they do best, and the result is a simple and staggering ode to the joy and craftsmanship of American pop.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 67 Critic Score
    TLC
    If the new songs are likable enough, none eclipse those of their peak. Luckily, TLC has always had as much to do with an emotional connection as with the music. Here, they stoke it in ways likely to give longtime fans a nice glow.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 75 Critic Score
    With so much talent and so much content, it’s frustrating that he couldn’t deliver a higher-quality product.
    • 89 Metascore
    • 91 Critic Score
    The full-length follow-up to his 2015 debut, Summertime ’06, surpasses expectations, with incisive lyrics and beats that spurn current trends for a set that sounds unlike anything else in hip-hop right now.
    • 91 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    It’s Lorde’s own storytelling that offers Melodrama‘s most rewarding twists.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 83 Critic Score
    On their latest, the band’s melodies are crisper and sonic dynamics and tempo-shifts are employed to greater effect.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 75 Critic Score
    Chilly melodies meshes well with Perry’s diary of reflection and self-enlightenment. In fact, many of these songs are written in sad-sounding minor keys as opposed to cheery major ones. It’s a smart trick. ... If there were a few more pure pop moments like those songs [[Bon Appétit and Swish Swish], Perry would’ve made something truly worth witnessing.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 91 Critic Score
    His most accomplished to date. On the proper follow-up to Strange Desire, Antonoff is more sonically self-assured and conceptually mission-driven, weaving together a 12-song cycle--inspired by the heartbreaking death of his sister, Sarah, from brain cancer when he was 18.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 75 Critic Score
    Reconciling the folkie and the rogue hardly seems like Harry’s priority; instead, the 23-year-old basks in the privilege of paying tribute to his many musical heroes, and trying on all the styles that fit.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 83 Critic Score
    If songs like these paint Pollinator as Blondie’s self-tribute album, who cares. They deserve it after all these years.